The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "climate change"

Your search for posts with tags containing climate change found 13 posts

History and the Climate Emergency, Or: Tradition to the rescue of Progress

Olivier Guimond Participating in panels on history and heritage in recent weeks has given me pause to reflect on the relevance of the historical discipline to the climate emergency and climate change. The two events on which these reflections are based...
From: Borealia on 27 Nov 2019

L’histoire et l’urgence climatique, Ou la tradition à la rescousse du progrès

Olivier Guimond L’assistance à quelques panels portant sur l’histoire et le patrimoine dans les dernières semaines m’a donné à réfléchir sur la pertinence de la discipline historique dans un...
From: Borealia on 27 Nov 2019

Human Waste and Wasted Humans: Flotsam and Jetsam in the Anthropocene

Slaves in the Hold of the Albanoz (1846) by Lt. Francis Meynell © National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London Shortly after midnight on March 18, 1973, the Zoe Colocotroni, an oil tanker commissioned by Mobil Oil Company, ran aground off the southwest...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 8 Jul 2019

Thoughts for the week By Ron Owen of Owen Guns. 15th May 2019

Thoughts For The Week.“What you do in your lifetime will echo down through eternity”,Marcus Aurelius.Is it About Suppression?On the 18th of May we have choices to make in our Federal Election. There are two choices, two examples of people...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 14 May 2019

The New Volcanoes of Industry

Over the past forty years or so, climate researchers have written of the “human volcano” when discussing air pollution and carbon emissions.  As early as the 1970s, industrialized nations were spewing so much soot and ash into the atmosphere...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 22 Feb 2019

“Heavy Fumes of Charcoal Creep into the Brain”

Lake Eola (2005) by Steven Willis In March of 2018 I attended the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference in Orlando, Florida and delivered a brief paper on John Evelyn’s late-seventeenth-century pamphlet Fumifugium: Or, The Inconvenience...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 14 May 2018

The Anthropocene as Capitalocene: How Eighteenth-Century Novels Help Us Answer the Problem of Infinite Economic Growth

The Great Hall Bank of England (1808) by Augustus Charles Pugin and Thomas Rowlandson With the exception of Donald Trump and a few others, most of us agree that human use of the earth’s natural resources has caused environmental effects extreme...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 18 Apr 2018

Austen and the Anthropocene

“Jane Austen Populaire 3” (2016) by Eymery. Wikimedia Commons. Modern adaptations of Jane Austen’s works rarely emphasize climate change.  The intrigues of Austen’s protagonists are capacious enough to accommodate murder mysteries,...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 23 Jan 2018

Property, Weather and the Matter of Emotional Inheritance: Earth Day 2016

Photo by Michael Hoffmann. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.By Jennifer Hamilton One line of questioning stemming from my current research project, ‘Weathering the City’, relates to the affective–social phenomenon known colloquially...
From: Histories of Emotion on 22 Apr 2016

Climate, Sedans, and Bottled Water

I spent a few days in Beijing last week, the first time since 2005.  I expected to find changes, but I was nonetheless surprised.  Instead of vendors hawking fake Prada bags on the street (they would follow me chanting “Gucci-Prada”),...
From: Anita Guerrini on 17 Dec 2015

Hope in a Time of Crisis: Environmental Humanities and Histories of Emotions

From left to right: Tom Bristow, Cameron Muir, and Thom van Doorenat The University of Melbourne, 17 October 2015. Photo credit: Lilian Pearce. by Tom Bristow, Thom van Dooren and Cameron Muir. One evening in the driest grasses in the world, a child...
From: Histories of Emotion on 5 Nov 2015

The Volcano that Made Scotland Freeze in 1674 #History

An explosive volcanic eruption, a bishop’s ring and the Little Ice Age: How freezing weather and near famine arrived in Scotland in 1674… Or, four events that form an interesting historical pattern, but may not be linked one to an other....
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 4 Oct 2015

Living in the Anthropocene

26 October 2014, Berlin Last weekend I went to a public forum of the Anthropocene Working Group (AWG).  This is a group, mostly of geologists, who propose that the Anthropocene is a new geological era, “an official unit amending the Geological...
From: Anita Guerrini on 26 Oct 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.