The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "cloth"

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Your search for posts with tags containing cloth found 689 posts

The Colour of Mourning

I accidentally came across this trade card below, for a Matthias Otto of The Strand, London, and for those who are regular readers of All Things Georgian, you will no doubt be aware of my interest in trade cards, but something about this one specific...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Jun 2020

June 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “This mill was erected principally with a view of encouraging our own manufactures.” Although advertisements promoting local industry and encouraging “domestic...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Jun 2020

The Unveiling of Salem Women

A big transition here from New Deal Salem to Governor Endicott’s Salem but I am joyfully skittering back to the early modern era for #SalemSuffrageSaturday after spending too much time in the twentieth century for the #Salemtogether project of the...
From: streets of salem on 16 May 2020

Fire Buckets and the Fenno Family

The Skinner auctioneers blog offers Christopher D. Fox’s detailed discussion of firefighting and leather fire buckets in Boston. In particular, Fox profiles one maker of those buckets:While there were certainly a number of merchants in Boston from...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 May 2020

The Haube, a Simple Cap For 18tC Pennsylvania Moravian Sisters

Unknown Artist, Moravian Single Sister, Moravian Historical Society, Nazareth, PAThe head-covering worn is this painting is a Schwestern Haube, a sister's cap. A Haube is a simple, close-fitting cap worn by Moravian women, sometimes referred to as a Schneppel...
From: 18th-century American Women on 26 Apr 2020

Louisiana 18C - Race determined the Woma's place in the Social Hierarchy & even mandated Headwear

The tignon was the mandatory headwear for Creole women in Louisiana during the Spanish colonial period, and the style was adopted throughout the Caribbean island communities as well. This headdress was required by Louisiana laws in 1785. Called the...
From: 18th-century American Women on 23 Mar 2020

More Big Hair -- Higher, Higher, Higher

French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777
From: 18th-century American Women on 29 Feb 2020

An Interesting Take on 18th Century Shoes

.James Gillray: Fashionable Contrasts; – or – the Duchess's little shoe yeilding to the magnitude of the Duke's foot, originally published by Hannah Humphrey on January 24, 1792.The print shows the feet & ankles of the Duke & Duchess...
From: 18th-century American Women on 27 Feb 2020

Indigenous Possum Skin Cloaks.

Possum-skin cloak — Canberra Museum & Galleryhttps://aiatsis.gov.au/exhibitions/possum-skin-cloak
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 24 Feb 2020

Guernsey skeleton found near buried porpoise 'a sailor'

A skeleton found buried on a tiny island off Guernsey is thought to be that of an 18th Century Royal Navy sailor.Six leather buttons found matched those often worn by navy sailors in the latter half of the 18th Century.https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-guernsey-51374100
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 5 Feb 2020

Dublin Seminar to Look at “Living with Disabilities”

The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife has announced the subject of this year’s conference: “Living with Disabilities in New England, 1630–1930.”The conference will be held in Deerfield, Massachusetts, on the weekend of 19-21...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jan 2020

Twelfth Night in Occupied Boston

On Friday, 6 Jan 1775, the Boston merchant John Andrews reported:This morning we had quite a novel sight. The Sailors belonging to the Transports [i.e., the ships that had brought army regiments to Boston] consisting of about 30 or 40 dress’d in...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jan 2020

Amos Lincoln and His Prayerful Master

When Amos Lincoln died in 1829, the Columbian Centinel newspaper described him as “one of the intrepid band who consigned the Tea to the ocean, in 1773.” But it took another couple of decades before details of Lincoln’s story got into...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Dec 2019

In Business - Widow Elizabeth Peck Perkins

.Elizabeth Peck Perkins (1736-1807), was a Boston widow, businesswoman, & philanthropist. She was the oldest child of English immigrants Elizabeth & Thomas Handasyd Peck. Her father became a successful fur trader & hatter; an outspoken Whig;...
From: 18th-century American Women on 15 Dec 2019

“A family mansion with a history of the stirring times”

Yesterday I quoted a letter that appeared in the Boston Evening Traveler on the day after the centenary of the Boston Tea Party. It described how a young woman named Sarah Bradlee helped prepare her four brothers and future husband to disguise themselves...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Nov 2019

Unboxing Pool Spear

Yesterday I noted the difficulty of finding out more information about a sailor with a common name. Luckily, the next person on George Gailer’s list of people who tarred and feathered him in October 1769 has an unusual name: Pool Spear.Even with...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Nov 2019

“An assault, on the Body of the said George Gailer”

George Gailer, the first victim of tarring and feathering in Boston, was an ordinary sailor. He was therefore not the type of person who typically left letters, journals, newspaper essays, or other writings.However, we do have Gailer’s perspective...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Nov 2019

October 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? South-Carolina Gazette (October 26, 1769). “Neat Worsted Stuffs, proper for Negro Wenches Gowns.” Fourteen notices concerning enslaved men, women, and children appeared...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Oct 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.