The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "clothing"

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Your search for posts with tags containing clothing found 539 posts

London Prints of women in country dress - 1767 Calendar

.London printmakers published hundreds of popular & satirical mezzotints between 1760 and 1800, many of which quickly found their way to the British American colonies and later to the new republic.These 1767 calendar prints give a glimpse into the...
From: 18th-century American Women on 15 Sep 2013

Three Revolutionary War Symposia in Three Weekends

Three Revolutionary War symposia are happening on successive weekends this fall, so it’s time to pick and prepare.On 20-22 September, Fort Ticonderoga in upstate New York will host its sixteenth Annual Seminar on the American Revolution. The speakers...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jul 2019

Run neighbours, run, St. Al-ns is quadrilling it

“The Duchess of St. Albans, immensely fat, florid, and bejewelled, and a stout elderly naval officer wearing loose wide trousers, and apparently doing hornpipe steps, his hands on his hips, dance side by side with rollicking abandon. The others...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Jun 2019

How Pvt. Joshua Williams Ended Up in Boston

A couple of days back I quoted a deposition from Pvt. Joshua Williams of His Majesty’s 29th Regiment about a bad encounter with Bostonians in June 1769. Williams said he was then new in the regiment and new in Boston, which intrigued me but which...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Jun 2019

“Here comes A new or A Strange Lobster”

I’ve gotten away from reporting on what was happening in Boston 250 years ago, but this date offers a chance to catch up.John Ruddock was the North End’s big man. He owned a shipyard and thus employed a large number of laborers. He was a justice...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jun 2019

Modern aquatics

“A Thames wherry passes close to the wall of a riverside tavern, and is about to go under a high timber bridge. The two oarsmen have immense artificial-looking whiskers and curled hair, cf. British Museum satires no. 15962, no hats, and wear striped...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 6 Jun 2019

A view in Regent’s Park, 1831

Steam-driven coaches and carriages and three-wheeled vehicles loaded with well-dressed passengers fill Regent’s Park. The chaos and conjestion fill the park with dust and dark smoke and result in accidents. Printmaker: Alken, Henry Thomas, 1784-1851,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 30 May 2019

Two Prisoners of War Who Escaped

This series about redcoats in captivity after 19 Apr 1775 concentrated on the two men who gave depositions to provincial magistrates a few days after the battle. One of those men, Pvt. John Beaton, died in captivity and was buried in Concord. The other,...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 May 2019

Timeline 1700-1709 + Paintings of American Women

1700Population of the British American colonies: about 260,000 people. Boston has 7,000 people and New York, 5000. Jewish population of America numbers between 200 and 300.Massachusetts representative assembly orders all Roman Catholic priests to vacate...
From: 18th-century American Women on 26 Jun 2013

Maternal management, or, A plot discovered

The plot hatched by a mother to marry her daughter to an old wealthy colonel is discovered. Both the mother and daughter are fashionably dressed in large dressess, hats and large sleeves. The mother stands on a veranda looking down at her daughter seated...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 30 Apr 2019

Reports of Native Americans Influencing Fashion in 17C Europe

Jan Boeckhorst (Flemish, c1604-1668) c 1630 Portrait of Helena Fourment, 2nd wife of the artist Peter Paul Rubens at Royal Museum of Fine Arts AntwerpThomas Lechford (c 1590-1644) was an English lawyer who wrote about his experiences in the Massachusetts...
From: 17th-century American Women on 17 Apr 2019

“A particular Account of all the Plans of Operation”

In 1772, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson entertained thoughts of peeling John Hancock away from the Boston Whigs, thus depriving that party of major financial support. With troops no longer stationed in town and no new taxes coming from London, the populace wasn’t...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Apr 2019

“William Dawes’s Secret” in Roxbury, 7 April

On Sunday, 7 April, I’ll speak to the Jamaica Plain Historical Society and the Roxbury Historical Society about “William Dawes’s Secret.” Here’s our event description:William Dawes, Jr., is known today only as the other rider...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Apr 2019

Mrs. Crowninshield goes to Washington

A colorful, albeit a bit light, source for women’s history is the collection of letters written home by Mary Boardman Crowninshield (1778-1840), the wife of Benjamin Crowninshield, a congressman and Secretary of the Navy under Presidents...
From: streets of salem on 27 Mar 2019

New Findings about an Old Portrait

Earlier this month Craig LaBan reported for the Philadelphia newspapers on the portrait shown here. In recent decades this been widely identified as showing Hercules, a cook enslaved by President George Washington. Hercules achieved high status in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Mar 2019

Timeline 1750-1759

1750Over a million people live in colonial America.The British Parliament passes The Iron Act, limiting the growth of the iron industry in the American ColoniesThe word "bluestocking," is used as a put-down for learned women.Neoclassicism as a reaction...
From: 18th-century American Women on 30 Jun 2013

Alexander’s 18th-Century Fashion Advice in Boston, 27 Feb.

On Wednesday, 27 February, Kimberly Alexander will speak at the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston on “You Are What You Wear?: Navigating Fashion & Politics in New England, 1760s–1770s.”Alexander is a guest curator of the...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Feb 2019

“They grew noisy and clamorous”

Yesterday left us inside the 25 Jan 1769 musical assembly at Boston’s first Concert Hall (shown here in a photo almost a century later, after the building had been expanded). Following the concert, some army officers wanted to dance. Organizers...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Feb 2019

“A weekly and brilliant assembly at Concert Hall”?

It was no coincidence that James Joan moved from Halifax to Boston in October 1768, just as the 14th and 29th Regiments made the same journey. In fact, the same sloop that brought Joan and his family, Nehemiah Soanes’s Ranger, might well have carried...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Feb 2019

18C American Women + a bit of intrigue by Cosmo Alexander (1724-1772)

Cosmo Alexander (1724-1772) Self Portrait c 1747Cosmo Alexander (1724-1772) was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, the son of Catholic portrait painter & engraver John Alexander (1690-1765) and the great grandson of George Jameson (c.1587-1644), whom Horace...
From: 18th-century American Women on 17 Nov 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.