The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing club found 121 posts

Joseph Longchamp of the Jockey Club

Let me introduce to three brothers, who I am fairly certain you will never have come across before and neither had I until by chance I came across Joseph Longchamp and of course, I was curious to know more about him. The only reference I had about him...
From: All Things Georgian on 1 Jul 2020

Shakespeare’s Birthday in lockdown,

King Edward VI School wreath, 2020 The nearest Saturday to Shakespeare’s Birthday has for several decades been the day on which the town of Stratford-upon-Avon holds its biggest celebrations of the year. Birthday Celebrations have been held in some...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 25 Apr 2020

Dickens and the theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon

Dickens in 1842 Nineteenth-century novelist Charles Dickens is particularly associated with the festive season. His “little Christmas book” A Christmas Carol was published in 1843 and with its larger than life characters, dramatic plot and...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 30 Nov 2019

Taking Shakespeare to the great outdoors, 2019

  The stage for Shakespeare in Yosemite Around the UK optimistic announcements are being made for a season of outdoor Shakespeare. Typically, the weather forecast for the beginning of June indicates some unsettled conditions, but fingers crossed...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 31 May 2019

A scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern

“Fox and Sheridan (left) sit together at the head of a rectangular table on which is a punch-bowl, &c, looking with dismay at whigs (right), who advance to hurl their wigs at a large pile of wigs on the left (inscribed ‘The Heads having...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Mar 2019

Preliminaries of peace, or, Politicians puzzled

“Members of the Opposition in a row, talk in couples, except for the arch-egotist Erskine (see British Museum satires no. 9246) on the extreme left, who exclaims: “Peace – and I not consulted ’tis very strange, by Gad”. Sheridan...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 19 Feb 2019

Music of the Baroque Period

The Baroque era in music generally spans 1600 to 1750. Mistress of the Sun and The Shadow Queen fall in what is called the “High Baroque” period (1650-1700), when French music rose to one of the peaks of its own unique expressive...
From: Baroque Explorations on 17 Dec 2018

Emma Rice at Stratford’s Shakespeare Club

Emma Rice This week’s meeting of the Stratford-upon-Avon Shakespeare Club promises to be quite a departure from the Club’s usual lectures because the speaker, Emma Rice, this year’s President, has gone on record as saying that she doesn’t...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 9 Dec 2018

The Friends of Freedom and Atlantic Democratization

This post is a part of our “Challenging Democratic Revolutions” series, which explores the ways in which democratic ideologies challenged Old Regimes and how revolutionaries challenged notions of democratic liberty. By Micah Alpaugh...
From: Age of Revolutions on 6 Aug 2018

Shakespeare’s spring

Bluebells One of the greatest pleasures of spring in England is watching life returning over weeks or even months, beginning in gardens and parks with the blooming of snowdrops, moving on to daffodils, apple blossom and bluebells, to the mighty trees,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 5 May 2018

Back Bay Easter

We were a small party for Easter this year so we went to the St. Botolph Club in Boston for a buffet of oysters, salmon, eggs benedict, coq au vin, and lamb (no ham). This is the artsy old Boston club, and I always enjoy going there because the walls...
From: streets of salem on 2 Apr 2018

Who is the Shadow Queen?

{Portrait of Claude des Oeillets} The main character of my novel The Shadow Queen is Claude des Oeillets (dit Claudette), an impoverished young woman from the world of the theater. Socially scorned and denounced by the church, she lives on the fringes...
From: Baroque Explorations on 31 Mar 2018

>>>Why the title THE SHADOW QUEEN?

A significant number of early reviewers of my new novel THE SHADOW QUEEN have expressed displeasure with the title; they feel it is misleading. They expected the novel to be the story of the Sun King’s official mistress, Athénaïs, Madame...
From: Baroque Explorations on 30 Mar 2018

The Game of Hope: Who is the girl on the cover?

The painting on the cover of The Game of Hope is by French artist Marie-Denise Villers. It is popularly known as “Young Woman Drawing,” and can be seen in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. The portrait is said to be...
From: Baroque Explorations on 30 Mar 2018

The Game of Hope: How to Play Prisoner’s Base

Prisoner’s Base is a very old running game that was popular at Malmaison, and continues to be played today, although likely called by a different name. We don’t know which exact rules were played at Malmaison, but here is one version: Divide...
From: Baroque Explorations on 30 Mar 2018

Speaking Shakespeare in 2018

Robert Lister The speaker at a recent meeting of the Shakespeare Club in Stratford-upon-Avon was actor Robert Lister. Never heard of him? Well Robert wouldn’t be hurt or surprised. He described himself as an “engine room actor” and in...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 13 Mar 2018

Wagers at White’s

White’s is the oldest gentleman’s club in London. It was founded in 1693 when it was a chocolate house where people visited to drink hot chocolate and have a chat. Towards the end of the 1700s White’s took rooms on St. James’s...
From: All Things Georgian on 13 Mar 2018

Women and suffrage in Shakespeare’s Stratford

Elisabeth Scott In the UK we’re currently celebrating the 100th anniversary, on 6 February 1918, of the Representation of the People Act by which at least some women were granted the right to vote. I’ve written before about Shakespearean links...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 9 Feb 2018

Frith Street, Soho: Mozart’s London Tour

One Wolfgang Mozart, a German Boy, of about eight Years old, is arrived here, who can play upon various sorts of Instruments of Music, in Concert, or Solo, and can compose Music surprisingly; so that he may be reckoned a Wonder at his Age. The Mozart...
From: All Things Georgian on 11 Jan 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.