The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "collectors"

Your search for posts with tags containing collectors found 19 posts

Reading Between the Lines of a Postal Card Henry Folger Sent in 1879

By Stephen Grant My first descent into the underground vault at the Folger Shakespeare Library took place in 2007 during a short-term Folger fellowship. With a tape measure stuffed into a side pocket, I trailed Betsy Walsh, head of reader services, as...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 19 Sep 2019

The ‘Gimcrack whim collector’: Don Saltero’s Coffee House and Museum

From the late 1600s until well into the nineteenth, one particular premises, a former coffee house in Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, was a must-see on the list for visitors. Famous for its ‘cabinets of curiosities’, the ‘museum’ was known...
From: DrAlun on 10 Oct 2017

Marilyn Monroe and Art

Marilyn Monroe looking at a statue of Edgar Degas’ “Little Dancer of Fourteen Years.” Photo taken at William Goetz’s house, 1956 For those who follow my blog, you may have noticed that I have been researching stars and celebrities...
From: Alberti's Window on 9 Nov 2016

Yesterday se’nnight was taken from his labours to his reward…

  Title: Yesterday se’nnight was taken from his labours to his reward, the Rev. Mr. Catcott, Vicar of Temple, in this city, and chaplain to the Earl of Buchan … Publication: [Bristol, England] : [Publisher not identified],...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 6 Jun 2016

To the worthy inhabitants of this ward….

An appeal for gifts of money in exchange for a pewter token. The dustmen who issued this appeal have gone to the effort of printing this document to protect their business interests from “the Savengers”. Title: To the worthy inhabitants...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 17 May 2016

Letter : Bath, [to] Nathaniel Chauncy

Autographed signed letter from William Melmoth to Nathaniel Chauncy “concerning … Coxe’s picture in my old friend’s your brother’s collection.” Author: Melmoth, William, 1710?-1799. Title: Letter : Bath,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Sep 2015

Presence and Absence at the Gardner Museum

My son and I looking into the Garden Court at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, March 2015 My family and I recently returned from a trip to Boston. One of the main reasons I wanted to go to Boston was to better understand and analyze the gallery space...
From: Alberti's Window on 1 Apr 2015

Invoice for prints bought from Robert Sayer

A manuscript invoice issued by Robert Sayer, a successful London print, map, and chart publisher, on 15 August 1772. The purchaser is one “Mr. Gordon” of “9 Bury Court, St. Mary Ave”. The list is grouped by type, “10 historical...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 10 Sep 2014

A contemporary printmaker

Douce befriended some of the most celebrated artists of his time and his collections were widely used by them. When Grayson Perry visited the Ashmolean Print Room a few weeks ago, it was great fun to select some of Douce’s … Continue reading...
From: Douce Blog on 29 May 2013

A print by Cosway

Douce was a friend and executor of the painter Richard Cosway (1742-1821). Many works by him and by his wife Maria can be found among Douce’s prints and drawings -this nymph carrying Cupid on her shoulders is a good example: … Continue reading...
From: Douce Blog on 21 May 2013

Douce’s dream

In a previous post, I referred to Douce’s accounts of his dreams in his Book of Coincidences. In an undated entry probably written in 1817, Douce explained: I had a strange dream about eating a cross-bow as a broiled fish. … Continue reading...
From: Douce Blog on 8 May 2013

Amateur drawings

Among Douce’s drawings in the Ashmolean there are many by amateurs like Francis Cohen (1788-1861), who in 1823 changed his name to Palgrave and married one of Dawson Turner’s daughters, Elizabeth. Cohen gave Douce this watercolour of a street...
From: Douce Blog on 28 Apr 2013

We are five

I have just started cataloguing Douce’s prints of fools -the engraving below belongs to the popular type depicting a group of foolish figures that numbers one fewer than the title, so that the viewer makes up the total: On the … Continue reading...
From: Douce Blog on 6 Mar 2013

The Juggernaut Debt

In 1832, The Ballot published a series of “Sketches in Church and State”. The proofs for the anonymous wood-engravings can be found among the satirical prints that the British Museum purchased from the estate of Douce’s friend Edward...
From: Douce Blog on 22 Feb 2013

Bonasone in red

Over fifty prints by Giulio Bonasone from Douce’s collection were transferred to the Ashmolean in 1863. At the time, they were integrated in the main sequence and they can now be found under the printmaker’s name. The print below, however,...
From: Douce Blog on 8 Feb 2013

Britannia Excisa

This satire on Robert Walpole’s 1733 Excise Bill was misplaced (maybe by Thomas Dodd, who did some rearranging after Douce’s death) and kept among Douce’s wood-engravings, which I have been cataloguing this week: The print has been cut...
From: Douce Blog on 5 Dec 2012

“The Puck of Commentators”

One of Douce’s most assiduous correspondents in the 1790s was the Shakespeare scholar George Steevens (1736-1800), of whom the DNB states that “his wit and the associated learning [...] earned him the name of the Puck of Commentators”:...
From: Douce Blog on 27 Nov 2012

Douce’s Persian manuscripts

Among Douce’s portraits of ‘Learned Foreigners’ there is a plate from the European Magazine depicting the traveller Mirza Abu Talib Khan Isfahani (1752-1806): Douce wrote under the portrait: “This gentleman paid me a visit in...
From: Douce Blog on 12 Nov 2012

Douce’s Annunciation

When told of Douce’s acquisition of a View of Clifton Ferry with a Holiday Party and Bristol Fair by Rolinda Sharples (1793-1838), his friend George Cumberland wrote that they had been ‘sold at an auction to Mr Douce who knows nothing …...
From: Douce Blog on 11 Sep 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.