The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "colonial"

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Your search for posts with tags containing colonial found 597 posts

After the Herero ‘Uprising’: Child Separation and Racial Apartheid in German Southwest Africa

By Adam A. Blackler Regimes seeking to exercise power over a segment of the population, past and present, have used child separation as a mechanism of social control. In a previously unknown collection at the National Archives of Namibia in Windhoek,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 30 Mar 2020

Appel à candidature : poste contractuel en histoire de l’art moderne (Greencastle, 2020-2023)

The Department of Art and Art History at DePauw University invites applications for a three-year non-tenure-track position in early modern art (1400–1750) with a transnational focus, beginning August 2020. The successful candidate may have expertise...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 2 Mar 2020

A Matter of Measure: Tobacco in Seventeenth-Century German Satire

A German broadside published in 1658. Eight vignette etchings and a poem recount the story of tobacco’s arrival in Europe, and its ‘praiseworthy use by some German heroes/as well as the same’s real power and effect’. In the first...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 28 Feb 2020

Warren Johnson's description of the Mohawk Valley (New York State), 1760. Copyright, Link Only.

https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Warren+Johnson%27s+description+of+the+Mohawk+Valley+(New+York+State)%2C...-a030275538My thanks to Spence at http://minuteman.boards.net/ for this link.
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 18 Feb 2020

Ground Level: Exploring London’s Historical Coffeehouses

One of early modern London’s most common intoxicating spaces was the coffeehouse; a 1739 survey by historian and topographer William Maitland identified 551 institutions in the capital (although the real figure was probably higher), while by the...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 11 Feb 2020

Sarah Symonds of Salem

When I was a perpetual antiques hunter and picker some time ago, I would run into cast iron doorstops and plaster wall plaques with chipped paint depicting houses and gates and various interior details everywhere: they did not appeal to me and I passed...
From: streets of salem on 8 Feb 2020

8 Intoxicating Objects from Nordiska Museet

A key part of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with schools in the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Back in October, a group of 30 pupils from our Stockholm partner school Nacka Gymnasium joined our Swedish research team at Nordiska...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 29 Jan 2020

Axes in New France: Part 111 Casse-têtes (French Tomahawks)

https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.109/tnx.0f5.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Axes-in-New-France-Part-3-Casse-t%C3%AAtes-French-Tomahawks.pdf
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Jan 2020

Axes in New France: Part 11 French Colonial-made Axes

https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.109/tnx.0f5.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Axes-in-New-France-Part-2-French-Colonial-made-Axes.pdf
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Jan 2020

Colonialesque Christmas

The twentieth-century American artist Walter Ernest Tittle (1883-1966) was sought after on both sides of the Atlantic for his etchings, illustrations, and contemporary portraits. Among his diverse works are magazine covers, presidential portraits, and...
From: streets of salem on 23 Dec 2019

Addictive Cinema: 17 Intoxicating Films for the Holiday Season

One of the central and most rewarding aspects of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with sixth formers from schools in Utrecht, Oldenburg, Sheffield, and Stockholm. We’re all film-lovers, so Stephen suggested we assemble for our participating...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 16 Dec 2019

Turkey Figs

I was researching the major tea importers and purveyors in Salem in light of the upcoming anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, but another commodity kept popping up in the sources: turkey figs. I didn’t look at any customs records, but...
From: streets of salem on 14 Dec 2019

Smoke on the Water: Tobacco, Pirates, and Seafaring in the Early Modern World

In the 1990s, maritime archaeologists started to excavate the remains of a shipwreck in Beaufort Inlet on the North Carolina coast, excavations that continue (you can follow their progress on this website). It’s now generally accepted that the ship...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 9 Dec 2019

When Medicine is a Sin: Sex and Heresy in Colonial Mexico

Farren Yero Laboring in the Mexican mining district of Real del Monte, José Antonio de la Peña met Manuel Arroyo in the summer of 1775. The two young men struck up a secret relationship, sharing a bed, a blanket, and a provocative cure for...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Dec 2019

The Storied History of Indian Pudding

My contribution to Thanksgiving next week at my brother’s house will be Indian Pudding, which I have made many times in years past, always with variant recipes. As we are getting into the holidays, my general plan is to avoid some of the more serious...
From: streets of salem on 21 Nov 2019

Faking It? A Little History of Coffee Substitutes

Seas of rustic little-boy-blue flowers lining the paths stole the show on our summer wanderings through the rolling fields of Thuringia. I bored the kids as I analogously puzzled over its name. Was it a cornflower? Some kind of dandelion? A quick web...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 18 Nov 2019

October 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? South-Carolina Gazette (October 26, 1769). “Neat Worsted Stuffs, proper for Negro Wenches Gowns.” Fourteen notices concerning enslaved men, women, and children appeared...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Oct 2019

October 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Pennsylvania Gazette (September 28, 1769). “A likely healthy Negroe … to dispose of.” Shopkeeper Magdalen Devine occasionally advertised in the Pennsylvania Gazette...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 Oct 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.