The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "colonial history"

Showing 1 - 20 of 23

Your search for posts with tags containing colonial history found 23 posts

Teach my Research: Food, Colonization, and Religion in New France

Mairi Cowan and Whitney Hahn [Teach My Researchis a new occasional series at Borealiato help connect research and teaching, putting the latest scholarship on early Canadian history–Indigenous, French, British, or early national, to about 1900–into...
From: Borealia on 13 Jul 2020

Decorous Dispossession: Legally Extinguishing Acadian Landholding Rights

Elizabeth Mancke [Welcome to our summer series on Acadian history! We are very excited to be presenting this special five-week series, cross-posting on Unwritten Histories, Borealia, and  Acadiensis, and in collaboration with the Fredericton Regional...
From: Borealia on 30 Jul 2019

Wide Angles, Close Quarters: A Human History of the Grand Dérangement

Christopher Hodson [Welcome to our summer series on Acadian history! We are very excited to be presenting this special five-week series, cross-posting on Unwritten Histories, Borealia, and  Acadiensis, and in collaboration with the Fredericton Regional...
From: Borealia on 22 Jul 2019

Ordinary Women – Jeanne Dugas of Acadie

Stephanie Pettigrew [This essay first appeared at UnwrittenHistories on September 25, 2018, and is re-posted here through collaboration with editors Andrea Eidinger and Stephanie Pettigrew.] The summer before I started my PhD, there was a massive reunion...
From: Borealia on 11 Mar 2019

Reply to Benoît Grenier and Alain Laberge

Allan Greer I am grateful to Benoît Grenier and Alain Laberge for having taken the trouble to read my book and comment on my short polemic, “There was no Seigneurial System.” Indeed, I’m doubly grateful since I relied heavily on...
From: Borealia on 16 Oct 2018

There was no Seigneurial System

Allan Greer From elementary school books to encyclopedia entries to scholarly treatises, no work on New France is complete without a section on the “seigneurial system,” a phenomenon that supposedly shaped the agrarian society of this colony...
From: Borealia on 24 Sep 2018

Is History too Important to be Left to Historians? A review of Canada’s Odyssey: A Country Based on Incomplete Conquests by Peter H. Russell.

Peter H. Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey is a sweeping reconsideration of the foundations of Canada’s constitutional order that has garnered considerable attention and praise. This essay is the third in a three-part series assessing the book’s...
From: Borealia on 21 Sep 2018

A House in New Orleans: The Le Moyne Family and the Foundation of the Crescent City

Michael J. Davis “We are at present working on the establishment of New Orleans, thirty leagues above the entry of the Mississippi,” wrote the newly-commissioned commandant-général of Louisiana, Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville,...
From: Borealia on 9 Apr 2018

Le défi du chercheur bilingue dans un monde académique qui ne l’est pas

Joseph Gagné [For any reader who will not understand my French text, I apologize. This barrier illustrates exactly the problem I describe in the following.] Il y a un an, je publiais mon tout premier livre. J’ai récemment eu le plaisir...
From: Borealia on 31 Jul 2017

Revisiting New England’s Legal Development: Review of Chandler, Law and Sexual Misconduct

Sara Damiano reviews Abby Chandler's book, "Law and Sexual Misconduct in New England, 1650-1750: Steering Toward England."
From: The Junto on 31 Mar 2016

"Their is a grate Petition to Yr Honr By Gumby and The old House gang for som meat if yr Honr Think..."

“Their is a grate Petition to Yr Honr By Gumby and The old House gang for som meat if yr Honr Think Fitt of it” - Simon Sallard, overseer, to John Carter, Virginia plantation owner, 4 November 1736. Copied from Carter’s Waste Book ms...
From: Revolutionary Thoughts on 4 Nov 2015

The Great Moose Massacre

Mark Boonshoft discusses the tragic plight of moose in colonial New England.
From: The Junto on 8 Dec 2014

Guest Post: Teaching Toilets in an Age of American Ebola

K.A. Woytonik is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History at the University of New Hampshire.  In 2013-2014, she was a Research Associate at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies. Her dissertation is a cultural history of the Pennsylvania...
From: The Junto on 1 Dec 2014

The OId World of the New Republic

Michael D. Hattem suggests the need for greater exploration of the contributions of the colonial period to the early republic.
From: The Junto on 18 Aug 2014

Throw John Smith off ship

What happens when a musicologist teaches colonial history for the first time?
From: The Junto on 11 Mar 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.