The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "colonialism"

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Your search for posts with tags containing colonialism found 110 posts

After the Herero ‘Uprising’: Child Separation and Racial Apartheid in German Southwest Africa

By Adam A. Blackler Regimes seeking to exercise power over a segment of the population, past and present, have used child separation as a mechanism of social control. In a previously unknown collection at the National Archives of Namibia in Windhoek,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 30 Mar 2020

Appel à candidature : poste contractuel en histoire de l’art moderne (Greencastle, 2020-2023)

The Department of Art and Art History at DePauw University invites applications for a three-year non-tenure-track position in early modern art (1400–1750) with a transnational focus, beginning August 2020. The successful candidate may have expertise...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 2 Mar 2020

A Matter of Measure: Tobacco in Seventeenth-Century German Satire

A German broadside published in 1658. Eight vignette etchings and a poem recount the story of tobacco’s arrival in Europe, and its ‘praiseworthy use by some German heroes/as well as the same’s real power and effect’. In the first...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 28 Feb 2020

Ground Level: Exploring London’s Historical Coffeehouses

One of early modern London’s most common intoxicating spaces was the coffeehouse; a 1739 survey by historian and topographer William Maitland identified 551 institutions in the capital (although the real figure was probably higher), while by the...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 11 Feb 2020

8 Intoxicating Objects from Nordiska Museet

A key part of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with schools in the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Back in October, a group of 30 pupils from our Stockholm partner school Nacka Gymnasium joined our Swedish research team at Nordiska...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 29 Jan 2020

Addictive Cinema: 17 Intoxicating Films for the Holiday Season

One of the central and most rewarding aspects of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with sixth formers from schools in Utrecht, Oldenburg, Sheffield, and Stockholm. We’re all film-lovers, so Stephen suggested we assemble for our participating...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 16 Dec 2019

Smoke on the Water: Tobacco, Pirates, and Seafaring in the Early Modern World

In the 1990s, maritime archaeologists started to excavate the remains of a shipwreck in Beaufort Inlet on the North Carolina coast, excavations that continue (you can follow their progress on this website). It’s now generally accepted that the ship...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 9 Dec 2019

Faking It? A Little History of Coffee Substitutes

Seas of rustic little-boy-blue flowers lining the paths stole the show on our summer wanderings through the rolling fields of Thuringia. I bored the kids as I analogously puzzled over its name. Was it a cornflower? Some kind of dandelion? A quick web...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 18 Nov 2019

New Intoxicants, Slavery, and Empire in the Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Dutch Atlantic

The history of new intoxicants is intimately connected to one of the darkest chapters in history: that on slavery, and the exploitative world economic system that sustained it. The increasing demand for consumables such as sugar, tobacco, and coffee in...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 5 Sep 2019

Exhibiting the Acadian History of Pointe Sainte-Anne

Stephanie Pettigrew [Welcome to our summer series on Acadian history! We are very excited to be presenting this special five- week series, cross-posting on Unwritten Histories, Borealia, and  Acadiensis, and in collaboration with the Fredericton...
From: Borealia on 9 Jul 2019

Tolkien: a nostalgic boys’ public school film

The four principals of the film: JRR Tolkien, Geoffrey Bache Smith, Robert Q Gilson, Christopher Wiseman — at leisure, sports and war Friends and readers, I thought I’d write a brief review of the biopic film about Tolkien’s life that...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 15 Jun 2019

Review: Christopher M. Parsons, A Not-So-New World

Carla Cevasco reviews Christopher M. Parsons, A Not-So-New World: Empire and Environment in French Colonial North America
From: The Junto on 28 May 2019

Settler Colonialism and Recipes in the Early Modern Maritimes

Edith Snook [This is the second in a series of posts on the Early Modern Maritimes Recipes database. The entire series can be found here.] The region now known as the Maritime provinces of Canada had before 1800 a diverse population that included Indigenous,...
From: Borealia on 24 Apr 2019

The African-American History & Culture Museum: an experience that can alter the way you think about US history & culture

Tape Recorder used by Malcolm X. Wollensak Stereo-tape magnetic recorder, Model T-1515 Revolution is not a one-time event — Audre Lorde Friends and readers, People, if you’re in any doubt, go. It’s not only worth it, it is not as upsetting...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 10 Mar 2019

Nuit des idées 2019 à l’INHA – Face au présent : figuration / restitution des objets d’art non-occidentaux dans le monde (31 janvier 2019, Paris)

Au cours d’une soirée exceptionnelle, qui aura lieu dans la prestigieuse salle Labrouste de la bibliothèque de l’Institut national d’histoire de l’art, l’INHA propose d’ouvrir le débat sur le thème...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 30 Jan 2019

CFP: The Fifteenth Annual Yale University American Art Graduate Student Symposium

  Encounters, Entanglements, and Exchanges Fifteenth Annual Yale American Art History Graduate Student Symposium Yale University, New Haven, 6 April 2019 Proposals due by 1 February 2019 Points of encounter can occur across time and space. In colonial...
From: The Junto on 14 Dec 2018

Remembering the Unbearable Present: Colonial Biowarfare, Indigeneity, and the Challenge for Anthropocene Historiographies

“Anthropocene Word Cloud from Wikipedia.”  Notably, the words colonial, imperial, indigenous, violence, and their derivatives do not appear.   “It is hard for us to examine our connection with unbearable pasts with which we...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 19 Nov 2018

Colonial Canada: Making the Familiar Dis/Comfortingly Strange

Daniel Samson In my introductory colonial Canadian survey course, students sometimes complain that I spend “all” of my time on Nova Scotia. That’s not actually true, but I understand their point. It may be true that I talk about Nova...
From: Borealia on 5 Nov 2018

Property and Dispossession: Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America–A Review

Gregory Kennedy Allan Greer, Property and Dispossession: Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America (Cambridge University Press, 2018). This ambitious book considers “the ways in which Europeans and their Euro-American descendants remade...
From: Borealia on 22 Oct 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.