The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "comedy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing comedy found 56 posts

Irish Renaissance Seminar at Ulster University – May 18th

“SHAKESPEARE, ULSTER, BEYOND” A meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar Saturday 18th May 2019 at Ulster University, Belfast For further information on this meeting of the IRS, please contact the organisers Kevin De Ornellas and Alisa...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 15 May 2019

'Saturday' - Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

‘How am I changed! alas! how am I grownA frightful spectre, to myself unknown!’‘Saturday’ (published 1747)Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762)Portrait of Lady Mary WortleyMontagu by Johnathan Richardson,1725 (held at Sandon Hall,...

Open the womb to receive seed again

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 8 Jun 2018

Performing words #5: story

This post is part of a series on theatrical words. For an introduction to the series, see Performing words: introduction to a new thread on theatre and language. How much do we think about stories when we read, perform, produce, watch or study early...
From: Before Shakespeare on 7 Mar 2018

The Legal Connection – Shakespeare, Law, and Middle Temple Hall.

By Lucy Nordberg Middle Temple Hall An interview with Professor Jessica Winston, Professor of English and Chair of the History Department at Idaho State University, and author of Lawyers at Play: Literature, Law, and Politics at the Early Modern Inns...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 3 Oct 2017

Shakespeare’s Warwick

The Beauchamp Chapel, Warwick I recently went on a tour of one of Warwick’s most ancient buildings, the Collegiate Church of St Mary. As we were taken round, our guide pointed out memorials that made me wonder about the impact this town and its...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 19 Sep 2017

Notes on four words in Twelfth Night

[I wrote this a few weeks ago, and have been meaning to come back and edit it since then: to tamp down on some of the more effusive enthusiasm, to prune some of the more indulgent sentences. But given that this is unlikely to happen any time soon, now...
From: Thinking in Arden on 12 Sep 2017

'Hamlet's Soliloquy: Imitated’ - Richard Jago

To print, or not to print — that is the question. Whether 'tis better in a trunk to buryThe quirks and crotchets of outrageous Fancy, Or send a well-wrote copy to the press, And by disclosing, end them. ‘Hamlet's Soliloquy: Imitated’...

Generic excitement

Give ear, I pray you, and mark it attentively, for you shall hear the tenor of a strange and tragical comedy. Anthony Munday, Zelauto (1580) Genre: what is it, what does it mean, and how does it organise our experiences in the theatre, in a book or in...
From: Before Shakespeare on 27 Apr 2017

A “prity one”: Frances Wolfreston’s copy of Thomas Heywood’s The English Traveller (1633)

The early modern reader Frances Wolfreston (1607-1677) has attracted a considerable amount of attention from scholars in recent decades. “Frances wolfreston her bouk,” she often wrote in her copies of seventeenth-century publications. Intriguingly,...
From: Vade Mecum on 1 Mar 2017

Balcony scenes: Romeo and Juliet

1.1Outside Capulet’s house When I cupped her boob, laughter erupted. “What’s so funny?” I asked my friend. “You’re standing, like, five feet away from her,” he said. His father thrust his hips back and shot...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 9 Feb 2017

Just get on with it already: Love’s Labour’s Lost

Love’s Labour’s Lost was my final comedy. I wasn’t sure I’d make it through all Shakespeare’s comedies, to be honest. There are 13 of them, by Norton’s classification, the most of any genre. Some of these plays are...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 12 Jan 2017

Plotting Revolution, Part I: History’s Plots

By Nathan Perl-Rosenthal As historians of the age of revolution, each of us tells a bit of a single master tale, about the story of modern politics’ emergence.  Each of us narrates, in our own way, the death of an Old Regime and the New Regime...
From: Age of Revolutions on 9 Jan 2017

Harrumphing Hellenes and house-hunters: Troilus and Cressida

Me, shouting from upstairs to my wife in the kitchen: “Because African leopards are going extinct! Because facts are going extinct! Because, because…bullshit!” Thersites, railing against Patroclus: “The common curse of mankind,...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 7 Dec 2016

The Merchant, er, Mooch, of Venice

“I will do anything, Nerissa, ere I will be married to a sponge,” Portia tells her personal assistant early on in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice (1.2.83). This sponge is one of her suitors, a heavy-drinking German. But she does...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 15 Oct 2016

That merry wanderer of my life: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

I recently read that A Midsummer Night’s Dream – with the mischief its fairies wreak on the young lovers and the play the bumbling workmen stage for the newlywed duke and duchess – is currently the most performed of Shakespeare’s...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 5 Oct 2016

Through the pint glass: All’s Well That Ends Well

Of course, I decided to pick a fight the last night he was in town. My brother and I were at John Morrissey’s, a divey local not even a block from my house. It serves the cheapest Guinness I’ve yet found in Dublin. He’d been in town...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 8 Sep 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.