The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "construction"

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Your search for posts with tags containing construction found 57 posts

New Interview: I talk about reconstruction, whalebone and more!

Recently I was interviewed about my new position as a McKenzie Fellow at the University of Melbourne and about the research project on baleen and fashion that I will be undertaking there. I also chatted more about historical reconstruction and how valuable...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 4 Jun 2020

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 | Part Five: Finishing the Rebato

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part One: Brief History and Materials Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Two: The Pattern Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Three: Making the Wire Frame Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Four: Making the Linen Collar Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Five: Finishing...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 13 May 2020

Brewing up some history: recreating historical beer recipes

By Tiah Edmunson-Morton At the expense of sounding cliché, historic recipe recreations are a way to taste the past. Figuring out proper ingredients, considering environmental conditions, and using appropriate equipment all bring you closer to what...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Mar 2020

The Half-Axe.

I purchased my first hand forged tomahawk many years ago from a Blacksmith in Victoria. I realised after a while that the head on this tomahawk was simply too large for my needs, so I made a longer helve & turned it into a half-axe. I do not want...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 1 Dec 2019

Young Dark Emu By Bruce Pascoe.

Young Dark Emu, By Bruce Pascoe.I have just finished reading the book Young Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe, & to say that I am saddened by what I read would be an understatement. This book tells the true story of the Australian Aboriginal people, their...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 8 Aug 2019

The Case of the “French Vardinggale”: A Methodological Approach to Reconstructing and Understanding Ephemeral Garments | New Research Article

Reconstruction of French Wheel Farthingale, c. 1610s Abstract: This article showcases experimental dress reconstruction as a valuable research tool for the historian. It presents a case study detailing how two underskirts of the sixteenth and seventeenth...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 5 May 2019

The Early Modern Maritimes Recipe Database, Part I: What is a Recipe?

Edith Snook Early Modern Maritime Recipes is a searchable online database that collects recipes made and circulating before 1800 in what is now defined as Canada’s Maritime provinces.  The project was directed by Dr. Edith Snook (Department...
From: Borealia on 23 Apr 2019

But does it work? Playful magic and the question of a recipe’s purpose

By Melissa Reynolds One of the many pleasures of studying late medieval English “how-to” manuscripts is the wide and often surprising array of knowledge to be found within them. Most contain a good bit of medical information, such...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Jan 2019

Making Mr. Song’s Cheeses

By Miranda Brown The subject of this post may strike readers as odd. The combination of “Chinese” and “cheese” brings little to mind: neither memorable textures, nor fragrant flavors. Nothing, not even a single name like Parmesan...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Jan 2019

True Colors, or the Revelatory Nature of Cold

By Thijs Hagendijk Heat is transformative, brings about change, separates substances or bring them together. Every student of chemistry knows how to enable or enhance a chemical reaction by applying energy to a system, usually in the form of heat. Early...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 Dec 2018

The “Gentle Heat” of Boerhaave’s Little Furnace

By Ruben Verwaal and Marieke Hendriksen Ruben Verwaal is curator of the historical collections at Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, and at the Museum for Communication in The Hague. He obtained his PhD in June 2018 with a thesis on the role of bodily...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Aug 2018

Boiling hot oil: on the assessment of temperature in late medieval processing of linseed oil

By Indra Kneepkens Indra Kneepkens is a technical art historian, specializing in the materials and techniques of late medieval panel painting. She is currently finalizing her dissertation, which is focused on the use of processed linseed oils and paint...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Aug 2018

Back to Basics: The Smock in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

As many of you know, during my PhD I decided to reconstruction four items of female structural dress from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. However, in order for the reconstructions to be worn during photoshoots the most basic female undergarment...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 15 Aug 2018

From the Hearth to the Gas Stove: A Study in Apricot Marmalade

By Marissa Nicosia The early modern hearth and the modern gas stove are rather different technologies for controlling heat. Again and again in my recipe recreation work for Cooking in the Archives, I encounter complex instructions for managing cooking...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Aug 2018

HEAT! A Recipes Project Thematic Series

As humans, we want to control heat. We want to create heat, temper or even extinguish it, depending on context and purpose. We have a very limited temperature range at which we are comfortable (some microbes and bacteria can survive temperatures as low...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Aug 2018

Slide Carrs & Drag Carts.

From some accounts the slide carr or drag cart was one of the earliest known forms of transport. These were certainly in use in Europe, Ireland, Scotland & Wales from roughly the 16th century to the early 20th century. These carts or carrs could be...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Apr 2018

Performing words #5: matter

what’s the matter? This post follows up some of the points raised by Andy in his discussion of “story” and early modern theatre as part of his Performing Words series. Here, I suggest that the term “matter” might afford a...
From: Before Shakespeare on 14 Mar 2018

Apologies & an update!

I just realised that it has been ages since I last posted anything, so apologies to all my blog followers! The last four months has been so hectic and now I’m only a few weeks away from submitting my PhD! After I submit my PhD and mark my students...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 29 Sep 2017

Reflections on Reconstructing Eighteenth-Century Recipes

By Katherine Allen For the ‘What is a Recipe?’ Virtual Conversation on Saturday, 24th June, I reconstructed two eighteenth-century recipes from Mary Wise’s recipe book: a lip salve remedy and a pound cake. You can find out how these...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Jun 2017

French Farthingale Roll, c. 1600 | Part One: Pattern & Materials

Ball at the Valois court, painting, French School, c, 1580. Musée des Beaux-Arts de Rennes (detail)   French Farthingale Roll Part One: Pattern & Materials So far I’ve blogged about my reconstruction of two seventeenth-century...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 16 Apr 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.