The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "cooking"

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Your search for posts with tags containing cooking found 115 posts

This Week on Dispatches: Don N. Hagist on Martha Bradley and Eighteenth-Century Cookery

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews historian and managing editor of the Journal of the American Revolution, Don N. Hagist, about the fascinating... The post This Week on Dispatches: Don N. Hagist on Martha Bradley and Eighteenth-Century...

This Week on Dispatches: John L. Smith, Jr. on Thomas Jefferson and French Fries

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews educator, US Army and US Air Force veteran, and JAR contributor, John L. Smith, Jr., about the... The post This Week on Dispatches: John L. Smith, Jr. on Thomas Jefferson and French Fries...

Happy Thanksgiving! Our week with Martha Bradley, Day 4

In her recipes for November, Martha Bradley included only three for “Confectionary,” all of them jellies or custards. Her pies were savory, and her... The post Happy Thanksgiving! Our week with Martha Bradley, Day 4 appeared first on Journal...

Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, The British Housewife, Day 3

To accompany our roast, Martha Bradley in her 1756 work The British Housewife: or, the Cook, Housekeeper’s, and Gardiner’s Companion included recipes for stews, savory... The post Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, <i>The...

Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, The British Housewife, Day

Yesterday, Martha Bradley, in her 1756 publication The British Housewife: or, the Cook, Housekeeper’s, and Gardiner’s Companion, explained to us the various poultry available in... The post Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, <i>The...

Thanksgiving: A Week of Martha Bradley, The British Housewife

Autumn is when many North Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, a tradition that dates back to the Reformation in England in the sixteenth century. Journal of... The post Thanksgiving: A Week of Martha Bradley, <i>The British Housewife</i> appeared...

Around the Table: Events

By Sarah Peters Kernan Two weeks ago the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) hosted their fifth annual Transcribathon. I want to share my Transcribathon experience at the site hosted by the Newberry Library in Chicago, as I learned this event...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Nov 2019

For Your Medical Kit. A Natural Antibiotic & More.

www.myspicer.com/history-turmeric/Hannah Glasse’s 1747 cookbook, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. http://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/turmeric-history/
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 9 May 2019

Customised Brass Trade Kettle.

I finally got round to cutting my Track Of The Wolf brass trade kettle down to a correct documented size! I also made & fitted the correct type of bail lugs for this type of kettle. It is much lighter now, & of course it will take up less room...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 21 Apr 2019

Inland Icelanders Burned Whale Bones for Warmth

https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/inland-icelanders-burned-whale-bones-for-warmth/By K.N.Smith.An archaeological find shows that whale bones were sometimes imported inland to use as fuel.https://minds.wisconsin.edu/bitstream/handle/1793/6671/Experiments%20in%20Bone%20Burning.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 28 Mar 2019

This Week on Dispatches: Michael W. Twitty on the Legacy of African American Cuisine

In this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews Michael W. Twitty, writer, culinary historian, and educator about the legacy and influence of enslaved Africans on... The post This Week on Dispatches: Michael W. Twitty on the Legacy...

The complete house-keeper, and professed cook

Author: Smith, Mary, of Newcastle. Title: The complete house-keeper, and professed cook : calculated for the greater ease and assistance of ladies, house-keepers, cooks, &c. &c. : containing upwards of seven hundred practical and approved...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 21 Feb 2019

Getting Rid Of That Gamy Taste.

Soak the meat overnight in salt water/brine or vinegar. Wash the meat before cooking.
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 10 Feb 2019

The man of the woods & the cat-o’-mountain

A kitchen scene [with a satire based on the fable of the “catspaw”]. A monkey with Wood’s head squats beside a plump cat with the head in profile of Queen Caroline. She sits gazing at the fire with an eagerly expectant smile. He puts...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 Nov 2018

Interview with Ramin Ganeshram, author of The General’s Cook: A Novel

JAR: In a nutshell, can you give us a basic overview of The General’s Cook? RG: The General’s Cook is about George Washington’s enslaved chef, Hercules,... The post Interview with Ramin Ganeshram, author of The General’s...

Period Cook Book Links.

https://sites.google.com/site/archoevidence/home/historic-cook-books
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Oct 2018

From the Hearth to the Gas Stove: A Study in Apricot Marmalade

By Marissa Nicosia The early modern hearth and the modern gas stove are rather different technologies for controlling heat. Again and again in my recipe recreation work for Cooking in the Archives, I encounter complex instructions for managing cooking...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Aug 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.