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Your search for posts with tags containing crime found 438 posts

The Mystery of Ebenezer Richardson’s Mother

A very long month ago, on the day we reenacted the Boston Massacre for its Sestercentennial, I stopped by the Edes and Gill print shop in Faneuil Hall.Andrew Volpe was printing his recreation of Paul Revere’s engraving of the Massacre. As proprietor...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Apr 2020

Did Birmingham artist Samuel Lines know murdered Mary Ashford?

Early in the morning of Tuesday 27 May 1817, a labourer came across a pair of boots, a bonnet and bundle of clothes near a stagnant pit of water just north of the village of Erdington near Birmingham. He surmised that someone had gone into the pit and...
From: Naomi Clifford on 30 Mar 2020

Capt. Preston and the Town of Boston

On Monday, 12 Mar 1770, one week after the Boston Massacre, the Boston Gazette ran this letter:Boston-Goal, Monday, 12th March, 1770.Messieurs Edes & Gill,PERMIT me thro’ the Channel of your paper, to return my Thanks in the most publick Manner...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Mar 2020

Animal Victims of Crime

By Cassie Watson and Laura Sellers; posted 27 March 2020. In our previous work on the Leeds–based forensic expert Dr Thomas Scattergood, we noted that he performed toxicological analyses on more animal than human victims, including horses, cattle,...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 27 Mar 2020

“The Grand Jury haveing found bills against them”

As I recounted back here, the Suffolk County grand jury inquiring into the Boston Massacre took a lot of testimony about whether people had fired down at the crowd from the Customs House behind the soldiers.The foreman of that grand jury was William Taylor...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Mar 2020

Stephen Carver’s “Author Who Outsold Dickens” (2020): Biography of a Crime Novelist

By Stephen Basdeo When I was doing my MA dissertation on the cultural history of crime, my supervisor, Dr Heather Shore, advised me to read two now largely forgotten novels: Rookwood (1834) and Jack Sheppard (1839). The heroes of these two novels, respectively,...

The Misdating of William Molineu

Among the many interesting documents on the Massachusetts Historical Society’s webpage about the Boston Massacre is a letter from William Molineux, the Boston activist, to Robert Treat Paine, a lawyer practicing in Taunton.It says:Boston March 9...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Mar 2020

“The Truth and Nothing But the Truth”: Its first use in popular culture

By Stephen Basdeo ‘The truth and nothing but the truth’—it’s a well-known phrase used in courts of law and most of us have probably heard it in some police procedural drama. The principle that one should not lie in a court of law...

Gamaliel Ratsey (d.1605): The Man whose Life Kick-started the “True Crime” Genre

By Stephen Basdeo Gamaliel Ratsey was born in Market Deeping, Lincolnshire, during the late sixteenth century.[1] Little is known of Ratsey’s early life; his father, Richard, and his wife had several children and provided them all with a good education,...

“Both he and the boy were at Home that Evening”

An anonymous letter now part of the Sparks Manuscripts at Harvard relates what happened when Justice Richard Dana (shown here) gave Customs surveyor Edward Manwaring a chance to respond to his young servant Charles Bourgate’s accusation.That letter...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Mar 2020

“The flashes of two guns fired from the Custom-house”

Soon after Charles Bourgate reaffirmed his earlier story of being made to shoot down at the crowd during the Boston Massacre, the Boston Whigs (William Molineux in particular) got the young servant in front of a magistrate.This time that magistrate was...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Mar 2020

Gingerbread, Cheese, and Spilling the Beans?

Even as some Bostonians crowded Faneuil Hall on 6 Mar 1770 to report threatening encounters with British soldiers, the young French servant Charles Bourgate was telling his story for the first time. That morning, according to a sympathetic article in...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Mar 2020

Charles Bourgate’s Massacre

Today, 5 March, is the Sestercentennial anniversary of the Boston Massacre. I’ve written a lot about the Massacre over the years, including this post from 2007 about how the trouble started and how easily people could have avoided it.So today I’m...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Mar 2020

“The first thought was to hang him up at once”

When Ebenezer Richardson fired his musket out of window of his house on 22 Feb 1770, as recounted yesterday, that gun was loaded with “Swan shot.” Those were lead pellets ”about the bigness of large peas”—larger than “Goose...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Feb 2020

Claude Du Vall: The Ladies’ Highwayman

By Stephen Basdeo In 1671 the poet and satirist wrote an ode ‘To the Memory of the Most Renowned Du-Vall’.[1] It celebrated the bravery and heroism of an English highwaymen named Claude Du Vall (1643–70): And yet the brave Du-Vall, vvhose...

Hearing and Speaking the Law in Medieval England

By Sara M. Butler; posted 21 February 2020. A recent article in the Journal of Legal History by Gwen Seabourne addresses one of the more unusual requirements of medieval law. If a widower hoped to remain on the land brought into marriage by his dead wife,...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 21 Feb 2020

The Legends of Sandy Flash Drive

The Philadelphia Inquirer just published an article about how two roads in the region—in areas where I’ve traveled, in fact—are named after a Revolutionary turncoat and highwayman. This circumstance raises interesting questions about...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jan 2020

1739 - The Mother of the Infant in the Well

.By Dr. Anthony Vaver, whose fine blog on Early American Crime you may find here.On Saturday morning, August 11, 1739, a female infant was discovered in a well near the outskirts of Portsmouth, NH. Warrants were immediately issued, and a search was conducted...
From: 18th-century American Women on 17 Feb 2012

The Legend of Margaret Catchpole

Over two hundred years after her death, Margaret Catchpole (1762–1811) is remembered by many – for the things she was not and the things she did not do, largely because someone who never met her wrote her purported biography, which was largely...
From: Naomi Clifford on 29 Dec 2019

Christmas 1819

Well folks, today sees our final article for this year, in fact for this decade. We’ve had such a busy ten years, since starting All Things Georgian a few years ago, we’ve written over 550 articles on a whole host of subjects; researched and...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Dec 2019

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.