The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "criticism"

Showing 1 - 20 of 177

Your search for posts with tags containing criticism found 177 posts

“Mysteries of Lisbon” (1854) by Camilo Branco | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer based in Leeds, United Kingdom, whose research focuses on the works of George W.M. Reynolds, Eugene Sue, and Victor Hugo. Introduction One cannot study nineteenth-century popular fiction without encountering...

John Beaumont’s Boudicca (1647) | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. This post is adapted from recent research conducted into early modern cultural portrayals of British imperialism. Introduction British popular culture’s relationship with imperialism...

Victor Hugo’s “Ninety-Three” (1874) | Stephen Basdeo

Thus the guillotine had a right to say to the tower: “I am thy daughter.”[1] …So wrote Victor Hugo in Ninety-Three (1874). By the time that Hugo had published Ninety-Three—his final novel—he had been witness to some of the defining events...

The First British Edition of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Feathertop” in Home Circle (1852) | Stephen Basdeo

The good people over at Penn State University Press have a “very liberal” author re-use policy and allow academics to post preprints of their articles on personal websites. I recently had an article published in the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review and...

Luke Hutton’s “Black Dogge of Newgate” (1596) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. Spanish Origins During the sixteenth century a new genre of popular literature arrived in England. Adapted from literature that was flourishing in Spain, a stream of printed books...

The Early Works of Eugene Sue | G. W. M. Reynolds

Eugene Sue (1804–57) was one of the most popular novelists in nineteenth-century France and he certainly caught the attention of one young aspiring writer who was living in France during the 1830s. This writer was George W.M. Reynolds (1814–79). Although...

De Balzac’s Works | G. W. M. Reynolds

Honoré de Balzac was one of the most popular novelists in nineteenth-century France and he certainly caught the attention of one young aspiring writer who was living in France during the 1830s. This writer was George W.M. Reynolds (1814–79). Although...

Eugene Sue’s “Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Poniard’s Hilt” and the Arrival of Feudalism in France | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, United Kingdom. This article follows on from previous posts on Eugene Sue’s epic socialist novel Mysteries of the People. Visionary French Author Eugene Sue (Stephen Basdeo Collection)...

Sir Tremendous Longinus and the Ridiculum

It just sounds so rude! Sir Tremendous Longinus: somehow priapic and vaginal at the same time. It is also by far the funniest thing about the Pope, Arbuthnot, and Gay’s play Three Hours After Marriage in which Sir Trem appears as ‘the greatest critick...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 21 Jul 2021

Victorian Killer Snakes | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. The British Empire (Stephen Basdeo Personal Collection) Introduction During the days of the British Empire, colonial officers and civil servants enjoyed hunting wild animals: tigers,...

G. W. M. Reynolds’s ‘Memoirs’ Novels (1850–57) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK, and is currently writing a book with Mya Driver titled Victorian England’s Best-Selling Author: The Revolutionary Life of G.W.M. Reynolds (exp. 2022). Illustration from the Seamstress:...

George R. Stewart’s “Earth Abides” (1949) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. In this post he examines George R. Stewart’s post-apocalyptic pandemic novel Earth Abides (1949). George R. Stewart Introduction By 1949 humanity had experienced two world wars....

Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel “The Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Casque’s Lark”

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds UK. Eugene Sue Introduction In 1848 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels wrote the Communist Manifesto. In it, they argued that all history was essentially the history of class struggle....

George W.M. Reynolds’s Exposure of Army Brutality | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK, and in this post he examines G.W.M. Reynolds’s novel The Soldier’s Wife (1852-53). First issue of G.W.M. Reynolds’s The Soldier’s Wife (personal collection) The radical novelist...

Eve: Humankind’s First Revolutionary (1851) | Daniel Stern

This short essay, which argues that Eve in the Bible was humankind’s first revolutionary, was originally written anonymously in the French language, and later translated by Daniel Stern and afterwards published in George Julian Harney’s left-wing...

Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society

Please enjoy the recording of our second in the series of Table Talks, featuring children’s literature, labouring-class poetry, feminist polemic, creative life writing, Romantic poetry, and silver fork fiction: Thanks to Felicity James, Adam...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 21 Jun 2021

Ragnar’s Death Song | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK.[1] The History Channel’s Vikings is one of the most popular medievalist television series to date. In the United States alone, the series has, as recently as its fifth series, managed...

Mister Spectator’s Coffeehouse Club

By Stephen Basdeo On 1 March 1711 a new periodical appeared entitled The Spectator, written and edited by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele. Addison and Steele were aristocrats who in their periodicals wished to comment upon the habits, follies,...

Out of the Darkness: “The Catacombs of Paris” (1840) by George W.M.Reynolds

Distinguished G W M Reynolds specialist, Prof. Louis James, talks about Reynolds’s only known play. G. W. M. Reynolds Society The useful ‘Post on ‘G.W.M. Reynolds’s The Modern Literature of France (1839) points us to his only known attempt at...

George W.M. Reynolds’s Italian Chartist Republic

By Stephen Basdeo George William MacArthur Reynolds (1814–79) was one of, if not the, biggest-selling novelist of the Victorian era. Born in Kent, he was originally destined for a career in the navy, which was the path followed by his father. Upon...

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.