The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing daily life found 59 posts

Eagles, red kites and an Elizabethan wedding: a round-about way to come up with an idea for a scene

Yesterday I began searching for my next raptor to paint and I was captured by this fellow (or fella?), named, appropriately, “Imperious.” I wanted to find out the breed of this bird and if it might be one my character in The Next Novel might...
From: Baroque Explorations on 25 Nov 2018

“perhaps infernal would not be too harsh a name”

In the days that followed the occupation of Philadelphia by the British SARAH LOGAN FISHER described action in and around the city. She had heard that 3,000 fresh troops arrived at New York from England. And that General Burgoyne was “in full march...
From: In the Words of Women on 24 Oct 2018

“The house was new and pretty”

Brought up in the high society of the French court at Versailles; married at 17 to an aristocrat and soldier, with a promising diplomatic career ahead of him; serving the Queen as a lady-in-waiting; HENRIETTE-LUCY DILLON GOUVERNET DE LA TOUR DU PIN (1770-1853)...
From: In the Words of Women on 14 Jun 2018

Domestic Sphere at the top of the lake

Earlier this month I gave a paper at the ‘Domestic Sphere in Europe, 16th to 19th Century’ conference at the Schloss Schadau in Thun, Switzerland. The conference was run by Joachim Eibach, as part of his NSF-Sinergia-project Doing House and...
From: Material Histories on 3 Oct 2017

A Day at Home in Early Modern England: exclusive taster!

We’re delighted to announce that our co-authored book, A Day at Home in Early Modern England: material culture and domestic life 1500-1700 will be published by Yale University Press on 3 October. On the front cover is a drawing from the Trevelyon...
From: Material Histories on 12 Sep 2017

From Game of Thrones to Steven Pinker: Just how Lawless were the Middle Ages?

Posted by Sara M. Butler, 15 August 2017.  Game of Thrones (GoT) season is here again, and along with it comes the perpetuation of an image of the Middle Ages as a lawless society in which violence is ubiquitous and bears no consequences. Watching...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 15 Aug 2017

“Was took With The measles”

You may recall JEMIMA CONDICT from previous posts here and here. She lived in Pleasantdale, New Jersey and kept a journal from the age of eighteen (1772) until she died in childbirth at twenty-five. (She was married to Aaron Harrison.) Much of the journal...
From: In the Words of Women on 9 Mar 2017

Home stretches

Three plays left. Three, freakin’ plays. Romeo and Juliet. Edward III, which Shakespeare is believed to have collaborated on. My edition of The Norton Shakespeare does not include this play, although subsequent editions have. Joy. More reading....
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 16 Dec 2016

Harrumphing Hellenes and house-hunters: Troilus and Cressida

Me, shouting from upstairs to my wife in the kitchen: “Because African leopards are going extinct! Because facts are going extinct! Because, because…bullshit!” Thersites, railing against Patroclus: “The common curse of mankind,...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 7 Dec 2016

Tampons, induced vomiting, and Shakespeare’s King John

He greeted me as he always does when I come home. Through the frosted glass of the front door, I could see him perched atop the shoe bench, a shaggy black mass shimmying in excitement as I unlocked the door. He twirled. He jumped. I gave him some pets....
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 23 Oct 2016

“I see every prospect of our being comfortable”

ANN HEAD WARDER went back to England in July 1787 and returned to live permanently in the United States in October 1788. She describes the house she and her family were to occupy. 10 mo. 5th.—. . . . The house pleased me, being exceedingly convenient,...
From: In the Words of Women on 20 Oct 2016

“Such a general use of fans . . . “

British-born ANNE HEAD WARDER was the wife of American John Warder, a merchant with a base in London and a branch in Philadelphia. When family affairs required John’s presence he returned to Philadelphia in 1786 accompanied by Ann who kept a diary...
From: In the Words of Women on 3 Oct 2016

More from Shakespeare Confidential

Shakespeare waits for no one, but life doesn’t. Shakespeare Confidential – i.e., my Bard-logged brain – has been enjoying a brief respite with some family in town. I’ve been long overdue in sharing some of my other Shakespeare...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 2 Sep 2016

Three firsts (and three cheers) for the three parts of Henry VI

It finally happened. I started dreaming about Shakespeare. It came in a very peculiar, decidedly non-bardic form, though: a tweet. BREAKING: French slay English General John Talbot at battle in Bordeaux. In my bizarre, cyber-medieval dreamscape, these...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 4 Aug 2016

Glass houses and jelly meerkats: King Lear, Part

I have a lot of questions about King Lear. Like what is wrong with these people? “Which of you shall we say doth love us most?” a retiring King Lear asks his three daughters, Goneril, Regan, and Cordelia, as he divides his kingdom up among...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 22 May 2016

Drama drama: King Lear, Part 1

It’s bad enough I don’t know a whole lot about Shakespeare’s life or world. But I can’t even say I’ve actually seen many of his plays performed. I mean, the texts were intended for the stage after all. The last production...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 19 May 2016

The big 400

Today’s the big day. Shakespeare died 400 years ago this April 23. It’s sort of morbid, don’t you think, to celebrate his death-day? Well, I’ve been criminally behind in writing up Titus Andronicus. Maybe it’s just so violent...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 23 Apr 2016

A heavy lift: traveling with the Bard

I’m a bit sore today, thanks to Shakespeare. My wife and I have made our big move at last, staying for a week or so in Oxford, England before our final destination, Dublin. Yes, there was the sardine-canned, 10-hour flight from Los Angeles to London....
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 20 Apr 2016

The (eventually) sober light of day: Henry IV, Part I

Outside, a sterile sun was already burning through the gauzy clouds over the mountains. Dumping out the dregs of yesterday’s coffee, I spotted pink chunks in the sink. Some washed down the drain as I filled up the carafe; others were crusted onto...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 8 Apr 2016

Taking apart selves (and shelves): The Comedy of Errors

Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors is the IKEA EXPEDIT   – well, now the KALLAX – shelving unit of his plays. You know the one, black-brown with the 5×5 cubbies you can get those drawer-like inserts for. Every millennial apartment...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 20 Mar 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.