The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing digital found 1093 posts

Appel à communication : Toward a More Inclusive Digital Art History

Toward a More Inclusive Digital Art History Panorama, the online, open access journal of the Association of Historians of American Art Deadline: Apr 15, 2020 Call for Proposals: Toward a More Inclusive Digital Art History Panorama: Journal of the Association...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 31 Mar 2020

The Bluestocking Corpus: Letters by Elizabeth Montagu

This post for Women’s History Month 2020 explores the Bluestocking Corpus of Elizabeth Montagu’s letters, created by Anni Sairio. This first version of the Bluestocking Corpus consists of 243 manuscript letters, written by the ‘Queen...
From: Early Modern Notes on 31 Mar 2020

Corona Courses: My Top Ten Sources of Digital Content

So I have just finished converting my lecture courses into online formats: difficult to do midstream. A well-designed online course is a beautiful thing, but if a course is based on a more personal form of delivery and has to become virtual overnight...
From: streets of salem on 24 Mar 2020

Strange New World: Folger Resources for Online Learning and Teaching

I think Miranda will forgive the paraphrase when we say it’s a strange new world out there right now. For many of us, our lives have been turned upside down in the last week (has it really only been a week?), and we suddenly find ourselves...
From: The Collation on 19 Mar 2020

Recipes for Mud Pies

By Lisa Smith By the end of February, I had set up nearly all of this month’s posts to publish. But not this one. It’s been less than a month, but it feels like a lifetime ago. Back then, I was preoccupied with the community that came from...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Mar 2020

Pass Ye Remote: A Quest for Early Modern Entertainment Through Online Learning Resources

Welcome to Elizabethan England via the digital world! We’re lucky to have a range of exciting and innovative online resources at our disposal that make it possible to explore the entertainment and cultural activities of early modern England through...
From: Before Shakespeare on 16 Mar 2020

Appel à communication : Digital Approaches to Art History and Cultural Heritage (Oxford, 12-13 Jun 20)

Digital Approaches to Art History and Cultural Heritage Merton College, University of Oxford, June 12 – 13, 2020 Deadline: Mar 22, 2020 Digital technologies are transforming the ways in which scholars study visual sources and cultural heritage....
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 15 Mar 2020

The day I nearly died

It's easy to think of stress as something that affects other people, not you. That's until a life-threatening incident comes along. … More The day I nearly died
From: Writing Privacy on 4 Mar 2020

A Snapshot of the Food Studies Community

By Christian Reynolds From October to December 2019, the US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network ran a community survey asking what (and how) food scholars are currently using analogue and digital material. We were also interested how the community thought...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Mar 2020

Gillian Pink at the Voltaire Foundation: thirteen years and counting

As we approach the completion of the Œuvres complètes de Voltaire, I sat down with team co-ordinator Gillian Pink to find out more about how joining the editorial team led to becoming a researcher in her own right. Gillian Pink and Birgit...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Feb 2020

February 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Messrs. JOHN SKETCHLEY, & Co.” Robert Wells, the printer of the South-Carolina and American General Gazette, apparently experienced a disruption in his paper supply...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Feb 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part 1

Thanks to everyone who puzzled over the Great 1770 Quiz, whether or not you entered answers in the comments!It looks like the competition is down to John and Kathy since they answered both parts. If I try this again I hope to remember the bunch all the...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Feb 2020

Hacking Voltaire

The Voltaire Foundation’s first ever Hackathon took place on Friday 24th January 2020, as part of a generous John Fell Fund grant. It was held in the suitably historic St Luke’s Chapel in the Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, a now deconsecrated...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 4 Feb 2020

Elizabeth Powel and James McHenry Revisited

I’ve gotten some messages about this, so I might as well address it for posterity.Back in March 2017, I wrote a series of postings about the anecdote of Benjamin Franklin telling a woman we the Constitutional Convention had established “A...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Jan 2020

HUMA 7P55: An Example of Distant Reading (Augustine and Melville)

In February 2020 the HUMA 7P55 reading group will be testing Voyant Tools in conjunction with several theoretical readings by Reinhart Koselleck, Raymond Williams, and Ian Hacking. If you’d like to Read More, you’ll find a Voyant Tools analysis...
From: Dutch Dissenters on 21 Jan 2020

Henry Knox “after about three hours perseverance”

Here’s a link to the podcast recording of my conversation with Bradley Jay of WBZ last month about Col. Henry Knox and his mission to Lake Champlain to obtain more cannon for the Continental siege lines. And here’s a timely question about...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jan 2020

A “Publick Notice” about Christmas and Its Real Source

This image gets a lot of circulation this time of year, supposedly illustrating Puritan New England’s laws against celebrating Christmas. Often it’s attached to the year 1660.It’s been featured on Mass Moments and other websites. And...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Dec 2019

December 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “GEORGE COOKE, & Co. Have imported … [illegible].” The Adverts 250 Project and the Slavery Adverts 250 Project are made possible by databases of eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Dec 2019

The Tar-and-Feathering and Execution of John Roberts

Last month I wrote about using today’s online newspaper databases to track down a couple of reports about women tarred and feathered by sailors in the mid-1700s. Those reports turned out to be different distortions of a newspaper report about sailors...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Dec 2019

Curating; or, building the manuscript inde

Back in early 2018, I composed a series of blog posts about getting started with turning a dissertation into a book, including researching the publishing process, targeting series, oft-circulated myths, and, in five parts, how to fund it. The, at the...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 9 Dec 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.