The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "digital humanities"

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Your search for posts with tags containing digital humanities found 408 posts

Text Accordians

I write, with my keyboard, all day. Every day. E-mails, lecture notes, grant applications, status updates, first drafts, second drafts, slideshow bullets, blog posts. To paraphrase the great Johnny Cash, I type everywhere, man. And along the way, I find...
From: Michael Ullyot on 16 Feb 2018

CFP for MLA 2019: What Do We Teach When We Teach DH?

What Do We Teach When We Teach DH? (A special session on digital humanities pedagogy at MLA 2019) Over the last decade as digital humanities research has flourished, the MLA convention—as well as other venues—has witnessed increasingly vigorous...
From: Diane Jakacki on 7 Feb 2018

Happy New Year from the Steering Committee

When the Steering Committee last met face-to-face in November 2016, we set the goal of having ten recipe collections completely transcribed, vetted, and entered into the Folger’s DROMIO database by the end of 2017. Today there are seventeen...
From: emroc on 11 Jan 2018

Caretaking and Curating

As frustrating as this past month has been with the prospect of Salem’s history being extracted by the relocation of the Phillips Library it has also been interesting, as I dove into the depths of its catalog so that I could develop a...
From: streets of salem on 2 Jan 2018

Plotting Emotions in Shakespeare’s Plays at the “Collections as Data” Hackathon

Bronagh and I recently participated in the Moore Institute’s “Collections as Data Hackathon,” organized by David Kelly. The event brought together nineteen humanities researchers, software developers, and designers. We had two days to...
From: RECIRC on 19 Dec 2017

Renaissance Map Forgery

The auction house Christie’s has withdrawn an allegedly forged Renaissance map from its auction listings after scholars and map dealers questioned its authenticity. The map is a print of Martin Waldseemüller’s famous 1507 world map, one...

A Second Revolution Around the Sun

By Cindy Ermus and Bryan Banks This November, Age of Revolutions celebrated its second birthday. In only two years, we’ve witnessed our community grow to over 7,000 followers and subscribers, which is more than we could have imagined in November...
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 Dec 2017

Voltaire Lab: new digital research tools and resources

As part of our efforts to establish the Voltaire Lab as a virtual research centre, we are pleased to announce a major update of the TOUT Voltaire database and search interface, expanding links between the ARTFL Encyclopédie Project and several...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 21 Nov 2017

The #OthellosCrane Project: Storify

¶ Dear readers, ¶ I’ve just completed a Twitter play with a group of first-year seminar students here at Pacific University, and it has been an amazing experience. I am planning on writing about it in more detail in the future–and...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 14 Nov 2017

The Restoration Printed Fiction Database

Restoration Printed Fiction Bibliographers have done much important work on the history of the novel in the long eighteenth century. Scholars are indebted to bibliographies from McBurney’s Check List of English Prose Fiction, 1700-1739 to Beasley’s...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 8 Nov 2017

Welcome to #EMROCTranscribes 2017!

By Lisa Smith Welcome to our third annual transcribathon! The goal in previous years has been to take one book and finish a triple-keyed transcription of it over twelve hours. In 2016, 128 people from around the world finished Lady Castleton’s book,...
From: emroc on 7 Nov 2017

Joining our Transcribathon without experience?

Thinking about joining in #EMROCtranscribes this year, but feeling nervous? Worried about tackling old handwriting? Please read on for some tips from other first-time transcribers, as well as practical guidance on how-to join in! What it is like to join...
From: emroc on 6 Nov 2017

Guest Post: Recap of Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities Symposium

Ravynn Stringfield is an MA/PhD student in American Studies at the College of William & Mary. Her work considers representation of Blackness in comics and graphic novels through literary and historical lens, and though she hesitates to label herself...
From: The Junto on 1 Nov 2017

Varieties of Chiasmus in 68 Plays

This is the paper I delivered at the Pacific Northwest Renaissance Society meeting in Portland, Oregon on 21 October 2017. You can download the slideshow in PDF here.
From: Michael Ullyot on 21 Oct 2017

Get with the Programming

(This continues my previous post on this research project, about my questions and initial steps.) This week I’m away to the Pacific Northwest Renaissance Conference to deliver a paper on rhetorical figures in early modern drama. (Wait! Don’t...
From: Michael Ullyot on 16 Oct 2017

Find all the Figures

What? “Ask not what your country can do for you.” Instead, ask what the next line is from President Kennedy’s 1961 inaugural address. Most will remember the second part of that familiar sentence: “but what you can do for your country.”...
From: Michael Ullyot on 29 Sep 2017

Visualizing Social Networks: Palladio and the Encyclopédistes, Pt II

By Melanie Conroy In my first post on Palladio, we explored points-based and point-to-point based mapping. In this post, we will focus on how we can use Palladio to visualize networks. A network can link people, places, books, or any other entities that...
From: Age of Revolutions on 27 Sep 2017

Voltaire Foundation appoints Digital Research Fellow

I am delighted to announce my appointment as Digital Research Fellow at the Voltaire Foundation for the academic year 2017-2018. This is the first Digital Humanities appointment in French at Oxford, and is made possible by the generosity of M. Julien...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 26 Sep 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.