The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "dissemination"

Showing 1 - 20 of 27

Your search for posts with tags containing dissemination found 27 posts

September 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Original of this Advertisement, with the Subscribers Names, which are omitted, may be seen at the Printing-Office.” Colonial printers disseminated information via newspapers,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Sep 2021

April 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Rider from Boston to Northampton, Deerfield, &c.” Silent Wilde’s advertisement in the April 8, 1771, edition of the Boston Evening-Post testified to the dissemination...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Apr 2021

March 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Gentlemen, in and near Boston, who have signified their Desire of becoming Subscribers.” In 1771, printers in Boston published more newspapers than in any other town...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Mar 2021

January 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “AN exact List of Blanks and Prizes in Fanueil-Hall Lottery, to [be] seen at the Printing-Office.” Printing offices were hubs for disseminating information in eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Jan 2021

Virtual Office Hours

This past week, several of the archaeologists partnered up with the Bibliographical Society of America to offer a webinar on the uses of AOR for remote teaching and research. Many thanks to Erin Schreiner for including us in the series, as well as for...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 26 Mar 2020

February 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The business of supplying them with papers.” William Stanton placed an advertisement in the February 12, 1770, edition of the Connecticut Courant to follow up on a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Feb 2020

Looking Back, Looking Forward

It’s been a busy few weeks here at AOR as we look to finalize the content of our website, and it’s hard to believe that our final AOR symposium took place over a month ago! It was encouraging to see so many old and new faces in Senate House...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 5 Mar 2019

The Updated AOR Viewer is Now Live

Happy Fri-Dee, everyone. After much transcribing, tinkering, and typing, we’re happy to unveil the fully-updated Archaeology of Reading viewer! We hope it provides a functional and sharp facelift to the Gabriel Harvey books, which are now joined...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 8 Feb 2019

Project Update: John Dee Meets Albert Einstein

Two weeks ago, a good portion of the AOR Humanities team convened at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton for one final meeting before we all meet in London to celebrate the end of the project! Unlike March’s meeting on Dee and his books,...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 10 Oct 2018

Talk About Change

In a time when events seem ever and ever out of our control, writing is resistance. –Our Mel. In April, Linguistic DNA began collaborating with local social entrepreneurs Our Mel to do some collective thinking about the power of language. This
From: Linguistic DNA on 15 Jun 2018

May 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A few of the so much esteem’d FARMER’s Letters.” Isaac Beers and Elias Beers sold a variety of goods at their shop in New Haven. In the spring of 1768 they...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 May 2018

John Dee’s IDs

A signed note on the title page of Dee’s copy of the BaderbuchlinBlizzard aside, it was great to take AoR on the road for this year’s RSA in New Orleans. Some great conversations emerged from discussion of Dee’s books, both in and out...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 25 Apr 2018

Defying interpretation? Topical marginalia and the history of reading

At the most recent conference of the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) in New Orleans, I planned to speak about the difficulties in writing a more general history of historical reading practices and offer several possible solutions. More specifically,...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 9 Apr 2018

November 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-Hampshire Gazette (November 6, 1767).“Care will be taken to have all the English and American News Papers, Magazines, and political Pamphlets.” In the fall of 1767...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Nov 2017

Women’s History in the Digital World

The third biennial Women’s History in the Digital World conference was held at Maynooth University last week, organized by Jennifer Redmond and Jackie Crowley. First initiated in 2013 at the Albert M. Greenfield Digital Center for the History of...
From: RECIRC on 11 Jul 2017

Exploring data visualizations and putting the “digital” in “digital humanities”

If you follow me on Twitter, you may have noticed that there’s been a shift in the kinds of things I’ve been posting lately. Suddenly, photos of rare books and manuscripts have given way to goofy JavaScript animations and screenshots. That’s...
From: RECIRC on 9 Jun 2017

AOR launch in London

Last Thursday (13.10.2016) the UCL Common Ground provided the stage for our workshop in celebration of AOR going live earlier this autumn (see the previous blogpost). Posters and postcards had been circulating, and with clear results: the afternoon was...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 18 Oct 2016

AOR launch in London

Last Thursday (13.10.2016) the UCL Common Ground provided the stage for our workshop in celebration of AOR going live earlier this autumn (see the previous blogpost). Posters and postcards had been circulating, and with clear results: the afternoon was...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 18 Oct 2016

RECIRC by the numbers

I’m writing to you today from beautiful Bruges, where I am presenting at the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference. (In fact, my presentation is in less than two hours.) This is my second presentation this week, as I also attended “’Life...
From: RECIRC on 19 Aug 2016

The Curious Case of Catherine Burke

The 1760s saw the emergence of a militant agrarian secret society in Ireland called the Whiteboys, who would often dress up at night in white sheets and terrorize local Protestant landowners, destroying property and livestock. They emerged, in part, to...
From: RECIRC on 8 Aug 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.