The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing divine inspiration found 58 posts

A Page in the Life of Sarah Savage: Love Among Women

[In our mini-series ‘A Page in the Life’, each post briefly introduces a new writer and a single page from their manuscript. In this post, Amanda E. Herbert (@amandaeherbert) introduces us to a diary-writing woman and her extraordinary relationship...
From: the many-headed monster on 14 Nov 2018

‘Here I lie as warm as they’: who was buried where in the early modern period?

Laura Sangha This spring I had the good fortune to visit Kingsbridge, a small market town in South Devon. The town sits on a steep hill overlooking the many-branched estuary, and it is home to The Shambles (or market arcade) with five Elizabethan granite...
From: the many-headed monster on 12 Sep 2018

A Page in the Life of Ralph Thoresby

[In our mini-series ‘A Page in the Life’, each post briefly introduces a new writer and a single page from their manuscript.] Laura Sangha The Leeds antiquarian and pious diarist Ralph Thoresby (1658-1725) wrote a lot. An awful lot. Between...
From: the many-headed monster on 23 Apr 2018

The Tenth Commandment: the Depth of Sin

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) After a brief mid-term hiatus, in this last post marking the publication last month of my latest monograph, The Reformation of the Decalogue, I want to explore the Tenth Commandment....
From: the many-headed monster on 20 Nov 2017

The Ninth Commandment: Bridling the tongue

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) At first glance, the Ninth Commandment, ‘Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour’, was rather niche compared to the first four precepts of the second...
From: the many-headed monster on 30 Oct 2017

The Eighth Commandment: Theft; or, making it up as you go along…

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) The Ten Commandments were widely believed to be a comprehensive distillation of God’s will.  As such, every sin discussed in scripture could be located in at least...
From: the many-headed monster on 27 Oct 2017

The Seventh Commandment: Punishing Adultery

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) The Seventh Commandment, ‘Thou Shalt Not Commit Adultery’, was one of the most commented upon in the whole Decalogue.  ‘Adultery’ was quickly expanded...
From: the many-headed monster on 25 Oct 2017

The Sixth Commandment: Killing me softly…

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) One of the most striking aspects of the Commandments of the Reformed Decalogue was the sheer range of actions which they came to be seen to enjoin or prohibit.  However,...
From: the many-headed monster on 23 Oct 2017

The Fifth Commandment: Honouring ‘Father’ and ‘Mother’

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) The Fifth Commandment was the first precept in the Second Table of the Reformed Decalogue, heading the list of precepts which ordered man’s relationship with his fellow...
From: the many-headed monster on 20 Oct 2017

The Fourth Commandment: Keeping it Holy

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) After the Second, it is probably the Fourth Commandment that has received the most attention by historians, because it outlines what became one of the key priorities of Protestant...
From: the many-headed monster on 18 Oct 2017

The Third Commandment: What’s in a Name?

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) The Third Commandment of the Reformed Decalogue was ‘Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain’.  It would therefore be easy to assume that the...
From: the many-headed monster on 16 Oct 2017

The Second Commandment: The Protestant War on Will-Worship

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) Of all of the Ten Commandments, it is probably the second which has received the most attention from historians.  The Protestant renumbering of the commandments took the...
From: the many-headed monster on 13 Oct 2017

The First Commandment: Faith and Atheism in Early Modern England

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) The First Commandment in the renumbered Protestant Decalogue was deceptively simple: I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house...
From: the many-headed monster on 11 Oct 2017

Reforming the Decalogue: A Blog Series Preface

Jonathan Willis Regular readers of this blog may or may not be aware that I’ve spent the last seven years or so researching and writing a book on the Ten Commandments and the English Reformation, initially with the help of a Leverhulme Trust Early...
From: the many-headed monster on 9 Oct 2017

All ancient history now: England’s damaging Reformation

Laura Sangha On Tuesday 16 January, in the year of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, the Archbishops and Canterbury and York issued a joint statement on ‘the damage done five centuries ago to the unity of the Church’. It reads: The...
From: the many-headed monster on 19 Jan 2017

Horrid ghosts of early modern England, part II: creeks, screeks and…bacon?

Laura Sangha In my last post I explained the protestant position on apparitions – which was that they were most likely to be the work of the devil. However, the evidence provided by a range of cheap, short contemporary pamphlets suggests that ‘lived...
From: the many-headed monster on 27 Oct 2016

Dramatic news of the horrid ghosts of early modern England, part I

Laura Sangha St Johns Church, Leeds, in R. Thoresby, Ducatus Leodiensis (1715) In seventeenth-century England the sepulchre was surprisingly likely to open its ponderous and marble jaws and cast up the dead. Apparitions in questionable shapes regularly...
From: the many-headed monster on 24 Oct 2016

Understanding Sources: Churchwardens’ Accounts

To celebrate the launch of Understanding Early Modern Primary Sources the monster-heads have each written a brief post offering a personal perspective on the source type that they most like working with (the introductory post is here). Do tell us your...
From: the many-headed monster on 8 Aug 2016

Hidden gems of Tudor Church reform: the equal opportunities that never were, and dressing up smart for God…

Jonathan Willis Chasing up some last-minute references for the book I’ve been writing up over the past year or so on the Ten Commandments, over Easter I found myself making use of a local academic library to consult Gerald Bray’s editions,...
From: the many-headed monster on 9 May 2016

Fantastic Thoresby V: a late seventeenth-century Christmas

Laura Sangha Last week Jonathan laid bare the attack on Christmas in England in the 1640s and 1650s, describing the puritan campaign to convince the public that Christmas was popish and profane, and to persuade people to abandon the traditional merry-making...
From: the many-headed monster on 21 Dec 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.