The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "dogs"

Showing 1 - 20 of 78

Your search for posts with tags containing dogs found 78 posts

The fair in an uproar

With a large woodcut below the title and preceding the letterpress text: Madamoiselle Javellot is shown on stage flanked on either side by chandeliers wtih her performing dogs in costumes in front and a musician in the background, left, behind the curtain....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 21 Jun 2019

A Welch peasantry

A series of ten prints showing the Welsh men, women and children in a variety of settings, mostly in rural landscapes with trees and wooden fences. Author: Taylor, T. (Thomas), active 1804. Title: A Welch peasantry / sketched from life by T. Taylor....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 3 Jun 2019

The hero’s return

“A scene in the Empress’s dressing-room. Marie Louise is horror-struck at the appearance of Napoleon who advances towards her in profile astride the back of a crawling Mameluke; he is held up by two other Mamelukes who support his arms and...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 26 Mar 2019

Protecting the Sabbath!!!, or, Coersion for England

A satire on the puritanical message of strictly observing the Sabbath. A puritan stands on a barrel marked ‘St. Andrew’, his arms held out making a cross. He cries: ‘Clear the Streets of all Evil doers – Remember ye keep Severely...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 13 Mar 2019

Tales of faithful dogs from the Georgian era

There are many accounts of dogs seeking help for their owner following an accident. Here we’ve collected a few tales from contemporary newspapers. In the early evening of a mid-November day in 1767, a man named Gabriel Park was walking to his home...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 Feb 2019

The full moon in eclipse

An old man sits outdoors in an upholstered chair, looking through a telescope which is pointed up left to a black woman standing on a cliff with her dress pulled up and her large derrière bared. A dog sits by the man’s chair with a similar...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 10 Jan 2019

The bear broke loose

“A muzzled bear sits up, as if begging, on a fat woman who lies on her back. She says: “Gemini! what a Weight! my poor dear Mr Dripping was quite a Feather to him”. The bear’s keeper (right) raises his club, saying, “Down...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 31 Oct 2018

The itinerant chancellor

Four rows of designs with one to three designs in each, individually titled. Creator: Grant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, lithographer, artist. Title: The itinerant chancellor [graphic] ; [and 9 other designs] / C.J. Grant invent.,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Oct 2018

Christmass boxes

A satire, divided into quarters, with four small scenes of different episodes of persons trying to collect their Christmas boxes. In the first square in the upper left, a plump supplicant in an apron holds out his hat to a scowling-faced man with a kerchief...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 26 Oct 2018

The Puppy Water and Other Early Modern Canine Recipes

By Lisa Smith At first I thought it was a joke when I read a recipe for “The Puppy Water” in a recipe collection compiled by one Mary Doggett in 1682. “Take one Young fatt puppy and put him into a flatt Still Quartered Gutts and all...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Oct 2018

Mad Dogs and the Galloping Fever in Glasgow in 1712 #History #Scotland

In 1712, the Reverend Robert Wodrow hanged his dog: ‘The week before [c.17 September, 1712], and the beginning of this [“greatest land flood”], before I went east, the doggs turned many of them mad. I hanged mine, and soe did severall...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 22 Jul 2018

Criminality and Animal Cruelty in 18th-Century England

I am currently in the final stages of editing a book chapter I have written for Prof. Alexander Kaufman’s and Penny Vlagopoulos’s forthcoming work entitled Food and Feasting in Post-1700 Outlaw Narratives (2018). My own contribution focuses...

The rat hunt

“The head and shoulders of the dog, who has a handsome collar inscribed ‘John Bull’, project into the design from the right. One paw presses down a rat with the head of Wellington, who looks up in anguish at the dog’s angry jowl....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 2 Mar 2017

A street accident

A dustman bends over a large woman who has fallen and lifts her by placing his hands under her arms. She looks up angerly and shakes her fist at the dustman’s young assistant in an apron who looks on (left) with a smile and hand raised. Two dogs...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 22 Dec 2016

Poor Mr. Bull in a pretty situation

“John Bull, a fat “cit”, is beset by descending water covered with the word ‘Tax’, many times repeated, in which dogs, cats, and pitchforks fall with violence. His eyes and spectacles are transfixed by a pitchfork inscribed...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 19 Dec 2016

Tampons, induced vomiting, and Shakespeare’s King John

He greeted me as he always does when I come home. Through the frosted glass of the front door, I could see him perched atop the shoe bench, a shaggy black mass shimmying in excitement as I unlocked the door. He twirled. He jumped. I gave him some pets....
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 23 Oct 2016

The last stage of cruelty, or, A mercifull example of Quaerism

“A plainly dressed man with lank hair falling on his shoulders, bends over a dog, placing his left hand on the head of the trustful animal. With a large brush he applies a smoking liquid to its side saying, “Come here poor Dog! Thee shalt...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Aug 2016

Pack Saddles Link.

http://www.florilegium.org/?http%3A//www.florilegium.org/files/TRAVEL/Dog-Pak-Sadle-art.html
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 24 Jun 2016

Terriers in the 18th & 19th Centuries

Recollect that the Almighty, who gave the dog to be companion of our pleasures and our toils, hath invested him with a nature noble and incapable of deceit.”- Sir Walter Scott, 1825 My beloved Cody died in my arms this week.  He was put to...
From: Jane Austen's World on 22 May 2016

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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This is the basic structure:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.