The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "drama"

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Your search for posts with tags containing drama found 399 posts

Schools: Othello session – with Cyclone Rep

Cyclone Rep presents the Othello Session Online: The Colour of Skin The Colour of Skin begins in the U.S. with the Black Lives Matter Movement reaching fever pitch. Othello thinks this is a movement that doesn’t affect him due to his high status...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 10 Nov 2021

Theatre: The Tempest – South Bank Theatre, Belfast

Bookings are now open for the much anticipated production of The Tempest at Belfast’s South Bank Playhouse on 11-13 November and 18-20 November 2021. The Shakespeare comedy of betrayal, prejudice, magic and revenge is reimagined by Southbank director...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 5 Nov 2021

Review: The RSC’s “The Mirror and the Light”

I was lucky enough to get tickets to one of the first matinee performance of teh RSC’s “The Mirror and the Light” as a birthday present this year, and I thought that I would jot down some of my thoughts about the play. Spoiler warning: I am going...
From: Kirsten Claiden-Yardley on 26 Oct 2021

Victor Hugo’s Early Modern Outlaw Play: “Hernani” (1830)

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer based in Leeds, UK. He researches the life and works of several British and French ‘mysteries’ authors including George W.M. Reynolds, Pierce Egan the Younger, Eugene Sue, and Victor Hugo. He is also currently...

CFP – PANEL ON EMOTIONS AND HEALTH IN SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA AND RELATED FIELDS

ANZAMEMS 2022 CONFERENCE ON RECEPTION AND EMOTIONCFP – PANEL ON EMOTIONS AND HEALTH IN SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA AND RELATED FIELDS We invite scholarly proposals for papers on emotions and health in Shakespearean drama and related fields, as part of a panel...
From: ANZAMEMS Inc on 14 Oct 2021

John Beaumont’s Boudicca (1647) | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. This post is adapted from recent research conducted into early modern cultural portrayals of British imperialism. Introduction British popular culture’s relationship with imperialism...

Mr. William Shakespear’s Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies (1685)

By V. M. Braganza Title page of the Fourth Folio of Mr. William Shakespear’s Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies (1685), up for auction at Christie’s as part of the Theodore B. Baum sale in September 2021. But this rough magicI here...

Henry V (RSC/Shanghai Dramatic Arts Centre) @ Shanghai Dramatic Arts Centre

The RSC’s Folio Translation Project, designed to create new Chinese-language translations of the canon, began in 2016 with Owen Horsley’s production of So Kwok Wan’s translation of Henry V. Made available to delegates at the World Shakespeare...
From: The Bardathon on 6 Aug 2021

Ben Jonson, Workes (1616, 1640)

This set of Ben Jonson’s Workes includes a first volume printed in 1616 and a second volume printed in 1640. The first volume shows an interesting instance of use of an older manuscript as endpaper. Pen trials appear on the flyleaf of the volume...

Were French hood worn without veils?

Back in 2015, I wrote a blog post about the decision to depict the female characters in Wolf Hall wearing French hoods with gauze veils in a variety of colours (with their hair visible below). The new Channel 5 drama … Continue reading →
From: Kirsten Claiden-Yardley on 1 Jun 2021

Mr. William Shakespeare’s Comedies, Histories and Tragedies (1632)

Liam Sims (Rare Books Specialist, Cambridge University Library) Fig. 1. Title page with inscription by Nathaniel Dalton. Earlier this year I spent some time examining the Shakespeare folios at Cambridge University Library, on behalf of the Shakespeare...

Lewis Sharpe, The Noble Stranger (1640)

In early January 2021, rare-book librarian Jane Siegel discovered a previously untraced play owned by early woman reader Frances Wolfreston (1607–1677), Lewis Sharpe’s The Noble Stranger, at Columbia University’s Rare Book & Manuscript...

Whifflers, boy players and drummers: project team presents findings

On 13th January 2021 project PI Tracey Hill and postdoctoral research assistant Charlie Berry gave a paper to the Institute of Historical Research’s Centre for People, Place and Community seminar. Tracey and Charlie introduced the methods and...

Strangeness, Jacobean Drama, and Chester

On 23 April 1610, the city of Chester in the north-west of England inaugurated its new St George’s Day horse races on the surrounding fields known as the Roodee—a tradition that endures today.  To celebrate the occasion, a raft of...
From: Middling Culture on 16 Sep 2020

The Works of Shakespear in Nine Volumes with a Glossary. Carefully Printed from the Oxford Edition in Quarto, 1744 (1747)

By M. L. Stapleton I collect eighteenth-century Shakespeare editions, an outgrowth of my scholarship in this area, which in turn originated from my work as editor of the New Variorum Shakespeare Julius Caesar.  I recently...

Revisiting Carla Nappi’s “Translating Recipes 1: Narrating Qing Bodies”

Editor’s Note: Today we revisit a classic post from our archives on Late Imperial China by Carla Nappi, which sits the intersection of medicine and storytelling. “Narrating Qing Bodies” kicked off an extended series of translations and...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Apr 2020

William Shakespeare, Comedies, Histories and Tragedies (1632)

We have seen several examples of female book ownership of plays lately, but this is a particularly interesting one, of the 1632 Folio of Shakespeare’s complete works. The wonderfully useful Shakespeare Census has located 53 copies of pre-1800 Shakespeare...

Richard Brome, Five New Playes (1653)

As we have seen on this blog, women owned all kinds of books in the early modern period, including plays. Although we cannot date this particular signature with any degree of certainty, Mary Feltham wrote it in a copy (presumably hers) of a collection...

STAND CLEAR FOR THE WHIFFLERS!

Whifflers were ubiquitous in early modern pageantry. The OED defines a whiffler as ‘one of a body of attendants armed with a javelin, battle-axe, sword, or staff … employed to keep the way clear for a procession or at some public spectacle’....

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.