The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing early modern found 1773 posts

WFH 1: Working From (the early modern) Home

1: Doing business at home with teenagers As we, like the rest of the world, settle into the climate of pandemic lockdown, we thought we’d put together a short series on past experiences of “Working from Home”—something to which...
From: Middling Culture on 4 Apr 2020

The Bluestocking Corpus: Letters by Elizabeth Montagu

This post for Women’s History Month 2020 explores the Bluestocking Corpus of Elizabeth Montagu’s letters, created by Anni Sairio. This first version of the Bluestocking Corpus consists of 243 manuscript letters, written by the ‘Queen...
From: Early Modern Notes on 31 Mar 2020

Women in Alchemy

Antonio Neri, 1598-1600,MS Ferguson 67, f. 25r.It is certain that women have participated in the practice of alchemy since its beginnings, but hard documentation is scant. Maria Prophetissima, also known as Mary the Jewess, is perhaps the best known female...
From: Conciatore on 18 Mar 2020

The Covenanters and Their Graves Part 3 #History #Scotland

Where did the inscriptions on the Covenanter gravestones of the Killing Times come from? What source of information did they use? To answer those questions has, as ever, required quite a bit of research … So here is a table containing way more...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 17 Mar 2020

Pass Ye Remote: A Quest for Early Modern Entertainment Through Online Learning Resources

Welcome to Elizabethan England via the digital world! We’re lucky to have a range of exciting and innovative online resources at our disposal that make it possible to explore the entertainment and cultural activities of early modern England through...
From: Before Shakespeare on 16 Mar 2020

Waste Not Want Not: Leftovers – the Afterlives of Early Modern Food

By Amanda E. Herbert As part of Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a $1.5 million Mellon initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute of the Folger Shakespeare Library, I’ll be working...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Feb 2020

Waste Not Want Not: Molasses in Colonial America – More than a Waste Product?

By Mimi Goodall Molasses is the dark brown, sweet, sticky goo that is known today for its robust flavour. It gives a depth of taste to gingerbreads, toffees and fruitcakes. It does not have the immediate tongue-numbing sweetness of powder sugar; rather,...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Feb 2020

The Benefits of Juniper Berries

Today pubs and bars are filled to the brim with wondrous varieties of Gin. The spirit has been resurgent in recent years becoming the fashionable drink of discerning customers. Its varied flavours created through the use of different botanical blends...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 19 Feb 2020

Calendars of State Papers Domestic on the Internet Archive

Among its many other wonders, you can find a marvellous run of 16th- and 17th-century CSPD on the Internet Archive. But they’re not consistently titled, and there are duplicates of many volumes, so it’s not easy to piece them together. I made...
From: Early Modern Notes on 7 Feb 2020

Waste Not, Want Not: Physics and Fruitcakes

By Simon Werrett In 1767, the Winchester writer Ann Shackleford gave a recipe for clear fruit cakes in her Modern Art of Cookery Improved (1767). A candied fruit juice should be placed ‘upon glass plates, or pieces of glass’ and dried in a...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 Feb 2020

Exhibition announcement

We’re very pleased to reveal that the Civic London project team will be running an exhibition at the Guildhall Library in the City of London this summer. Running from 11th May to mid-July 2020, the exhibition will be free to the public. It will...

Waste Not, Want Not: An Introduction to Histories of Food Waste, Thrift, and Sustainability.

By Eleanor Barnett and Katrina Moseley As awareness of global climate and humanitarian issues increases, a growing number of us are seeking ways to grow, buy, and eat food more sustainably – by, for example, using food sharing apps to prevent food...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Feb 2020

Ruff Play with Shakespeare: combat, gender and entertainment

Wrestling Resurgence, @RobBrazierPhoto Before Shakespeare and Engendering the Stage are delighted to announce our next performance workshop, focusing on combat as entertainment—in both Shakespeare’s  time and today. Combat,...
From: Before Shakespeare on 31 Jan 2020

January 2020: a Taste of “Before ‘Farm to Table'” Part IV

Dear Recipes Project community, Happy 2020! This month we’ll mark the new year by highlighting some discoveries from the Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a Mellon initiative in collaborative research...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Jan 2020

History Today review: The Matter of Song in Early Modern England by Katherine R Larson

A couple of years ago I was lucky enough to hear legendary English folk singer Shirley Collins perform. One of the songs she sang was ‘Awake, Awake’, written by Thomas Deloney in 1580 but seemingly forgotten until Ralph Vaughan Williams heard...
From: Mathew Lyons on 27 Jan 2020

How not to write women out of history

The Parliament of Women (1646), on which Neville based his satirical libels. Admittedly, my headline sounds a bit dramatic. But I am serious about this. Several years ago, I reviewed two books in short succession: one, a collection of essays on Oliver...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 17 Jan 2020

Furnishing the tower house: nobles, lairds, merchants & craftsmen

This post is about the furnishings of tower houses, and the documentary record. The first thing to note is that Scottish furnishings from the sixteenth- and seventeenth centuries are very rare. This may be contrasted with the apparent survival of quantities...
From: Objects and the archive on 15 Jan 2020

Dumbarton Castle: Women at Work

In March 2019 I looked at the history of Dumbarton Castle from 1500 to 1700 for Historic Environment Scotland, highlighting events and people. It was interesting to read of one of the keepers in 1620, Sir John Stewart of Methven who built a castle on...
From: Objects and the archive on 15 Jan 2020

Anna of Denmark: Costume, Colours, and Identities in Scotland

This is a transcript of a talk I gave at Riddles Court in Edinburgh and Jesus College, Oxford, in 2019 about Anna of Denmark in Scotland, 1589 to 1603 Introduction In Scotland Anna of Denmark had her own household separate from the kings’. These...
From: Objects and the archive on 11 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.