The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "economy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing economy found 145 posts

James Otis’s Legal Recovery

As James Otis, Jr., recovered physically from the blow on his head with the help of top Boston doctors, he also took legal steps with the help of top Boston lawyers. In order of seniority, the three men Otis hired to represent him were:Samuel Fitch (1724-1799)John...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Dec 2019

Capt. David Bradlee, Wine-Merchant

If there’s not enough evidence to say David Bradlee participated in the Boston Tea Party of 1773, I don’t know what he did between the collapse of George Gailer’s lawsuit in late 1771 and the start of the war.When Bradlee resurfaces...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Nov 2019

November 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (November 11, 1769). “A THEFT.” Multiple reports of theft appeared among the advertisements inserted in the November 11, 1769, edition of the Providence...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Nov 2019

Adelman on “Revolutionary Networks”

If you’re intrigued by the stories of John Mein, Edes and Gill, Mills and Hicks, and other Boston printers behaving badly, check out Joseph M. Adelman’s new book Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789,...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Nov 2019

“Virginia Billy” Comes of Age

The Princetonians profile of William Burnet Brown is a wonderful model of wringing a character study out of limited evidence.Brown left almost no trace on the records of what became Princeton University except in the account books, but James McLachlan...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Oct 2019

Hardesty on New England Slavery in Medford, 17 Oct.

On Thursday, 17 October, Jared Hardesty will speak at the Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford on his new book, Black Lives, Native Lands, White Worlds: A History of Slavery in New England. The site describes the book this way:Shortly after the...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Oct 2019

The Rev. Mr. John Cotton on Anne Hutchinson & Local Economics. The Just Price, 1639.

(The Rev. Cotton, born, Derby, England, 1585. BA, Trinity College, Cambridge, 1602. Masters, Emmanuel College, 1606, BD, 1613. Fellow, Head Lecturer, Dean & Catechist, Emmanuel College. First Wife, Elizabeth Horrocks. Vicar, St. Botolph's Parish Church,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 12 Oct 2019

October 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (October 7, 1769). “STolen … a black Broadcloth Coat and Waistcoat.” Advertisements in eighteenth-century newspapers reveal many avenues for...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Oct 2019

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches...

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches wide, 224 full-color pages of maps, charts, and other illustrations of Boston history.I got a copy because I worked with editor Nancy S. Seasholes...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Oct 2019

Economistes and the Reinvention of Empire: France in the Americas and Africa, c. 1750-18

By Pernille Røge When France’s old-regime colonial empire collapsed during the French and Haitian Revolutions, it brought to fruition what Jean-Antoine Riqueti de Mirabeau had predicted as governor of Guadeloupe in 1754. Mirabeau did not...
From: Age of Revolutions on 16 Sep 2019

August 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (August 31, 1769).“The Store … was broke open and rob’d.” The August 31, 1769, edition of Richard Draper’s Massachusetts...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Aug 2019

“We shall conduct our Embassy”

Yale professor Mark Peterson recently published The City-State of Boston: The Rise and Fall of an Atlantic Power, 1630-1865, which has a provocative thesis.For centuries, Peterson posits, Boston tried to operate not only as regional capital of New England...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jul 2019

Dr. Ezekiel Brown in the Concord Jail

Yesterday we found Ezekiel Brown back in his native town of Concord. He had left as a boy, his poor family seeking better farmland, and returned as a young man with enough skills and drive to set up a shop—only to be locked in jail for debt on the...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jun 2019

Ezekiel Brown in the Boston Jail

When the British army put Thomas Kettell and other provincial prisoners from the Battle of Bunker Hill into the Boston jail, one of the men they found there was Ezekiel Brown (1744-1824) of Concord.Robert Gross discusses Brown at length in The Minutemen...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jun 2019

Joanne Freeman on “Hamilton: The Exhibition”

The Yale News recently interviewed Prof. Joanne Freeman about her work on Alexander Hamilton. The article explains:For a long time Freeman, professor of history and of American studies, was the only person she knew of who had much of an interest in Hamilton....
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jun 2019

When Wartime Riots Paralyzed London

On 2 June 1780, as I described yesterday, a crowd of over 50,000 people surrounded Parliament while Lord George Gordon presented a petition demanding a return to strictures on Catholics.The House of Commons dismissed that petition, and the crowd dispersed...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jun 2019

Being More Equal Than Others in the Electoral College

The Nevada legislature just voted to join the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, another step to ensuring the Electoral College count reflects the actual vote of us Americans. This initiative has obviously started to worry defenders of the Electoral...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 May 2019

Upcoming Events in Charlestown and Weston

Here are a couple of interesting Revolutionary history happenings in the next few days.On Thursday, 25 April, the Bunker Hill Museum will host a talk by Salem Maritime National Historic Site historian Emily Murphy titled “‘I Am An Honest Woman’:...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Apr 2019

The American Enlightenment and the Transatlantic Cod Trade

On Thursday, 4 April, the Yale Center for British Art will host this year’s Lewis Walpole Library Lecture: “Was There an American Enlightenment?” by Caroline Winterer, Anthony P. Meier Family Professor in the Humanities and Director...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Apr 2019

William Palfrey at the Boston Massacre

William Palfrey (1741-1780, shown here) was an apprentice and business protégé of Nathaniel Wheelwright, one of Boston’s leading merchants in the early 1760s. Wheelwright’s personal notes circulated like currency in the Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Mar 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.