The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "eighteenth century"

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Your search for posts with tags containing eighteenth century found 257 posts

À la faveur de la nuit: rethinking night and pleasure in the Age of Enlightenment

Pierre-Antoine Baudouin, Les Heures du jour: La nuit, ca. 1778, gouache on paper, 25.9 x 20 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The protection afforded by the night to lovers is more than a recurrent theme in literature. It is a cliché:...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 12 Jun 2018

The monster of Kirkthorp

Stories of monstrous birth were popular in early modern England. Lots of historians have analysed the materials produced about these children and shown that the meanings attached to them changed over time. In the sixteenth century people interpreted them...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 16 May 2018

Fetch Me at Pearl Nest Street: Rhubarb Pills as Panacea in Qing China

He Bian In the late eighteenth century, American ginseng opened up a new niche market in Qing China. At the same time, Chinese rhubarb (dahuang) roots, harvested from the northwest regions of the empire, were transported by Chinese traders all the way...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 May 2018

Mary Hicks Witch of Huntingdon

On 28 July 1716 Mary Hicks was condemned at the Huntingdon assizes for witchcraft and executed. According to the published narrative of her case, Mary dwelt in Huntingdon with her husband Edward and their 9-year-old daughter Elizabeth, the ‘Aple...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 11 Apr 2018

Making and Consuming Perfume in Eighteenth-Century England

Dr William Tullett asks why manuscript recipes for perfumes were on the decline in the eighteenth century, and investigates the role of the senses in perfume making. A survey of the vast collection in the Wellcome library suggests that the presence...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Apr 2018

Translating Cultures – Workshop at the Duke August Library, 26/27 June

An eighteenth-century German edition of Algernon Sidney’s Discourses Concerning Government (1683) If you are an early modernist interested in translation, print and the book trade in Europe and you can make it to Wolfenbüttel this summer, drop...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Mar 2018

A Dubious Death

Over the past couple of weeks I have been reading through some of the correspondence of the Radcliffe Family, who lived in Hitchin in the eighteenth century. One case has been copied out of the notes of Sir Hans Sloane, a successful medical practitioner...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 17 Jan 2018

Under the Mistletoe

Christmas is drawing ever closer and people are decorating their homes, soon, I’m sure, we will start to see sprigs of mistletoe hanging from door frames. We all know that two people under the mistletoe are supposed to kiss. But in the early modern...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 19 Dec 2017

Criminality and Animal Cruelty in 18th-Century England

I am currently in the final stages of editing a book chapter I have written for Prof. Alexander Kaufman’s and Penny Vlagopoulos’s forthcoming work entitled Food and Feasting in Post-1700 Outlaw Narratives (2018). My own contribution focuses...

Romanticism in the Dissecting Room

For centuries the need for the surgeon to learn more of the anatomy of the human body and to practice his art has required students of medicine to examine and dissect the bodies of the dead – obtained legally or otherwise – in private schools...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 29 Nov 2017

On Misogyny, ancient and modern

Mary Beard’s Women and Power is one of those books that will make you shout: “Yes, she’s so right!” – “Very well put!” – “So glad someone is saying this!” For those of you who haven’t read...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 24 Nov 2017

“For ourselves, for our house, for this”

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 2 Oct 2017

Freund Reviews Zanardi in ECS, Spring ’17

Eighteenth Century Studies 50/3 (2017): Amy Freund reviews Tara Zanardi, Framing Majismo: Art and Royal Identity in Eighteenth-Century Spain (Penn State, 2016).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 30 Jun 2017

Article & Review in ECS, Winter ’16

Eighteenth Century Studies 49/2 (2016): Cindy Ermus, “The Spanish Plague that Never Was: Crisis and Exploitation in Cádiz during the Peste of Provence.” Nancy Vogeley reviews Barbara H. Stein and Stanley J. Stein, Crisis in an Atlantic...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 27 Jun 2017

Reflections on Reconstructing Eighteenth-Century Recipes

By Katherine Allen For the ‘What is a Recipe?’ Virtual Conversation on Saturday, 24th June, I reconstructed two eighteenth-century recipes from Mary Wise’s recipe book: a lip salve remedy and a pound cake. You can find out how these...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Jun 2017

In honor of Robert Darnton

Robert Darnton in 2016 This month Oxford University will award an honorary doctorate of letters to Robert Darnton, a (if not the) leading cultural historian over the past 50 years of eighteenth-century French publishing, book trade and literary culture....
From: Voltaire Foundation on 19 Jun 2017

Finding your Feet

I am currently reading the diary of Richard Kay a doctor in Lancashire born in 1716 and practicing medicine, with this father, in the 1740s (you can find out more about Richard and his family here). Kay’s diary is interesting for a number of reasons...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 14 Jun 2017

An unexpectedly fashionable career

If asked today to list fashionable careers, it is highly unlikely that any of us would include ‘syphilis specialist’ in our list. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the prevalence of the disease in British society and the ongoing...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 11 Jun 2017

Excursion Report: CRECS Goes Gothic at Strawberry Hill House, 16 May 2017

On 1 March, 2015 the Walpole Trust reopened Strawberry Hill House to the public. As the former home of Horace Walpole, famed (and famously eccentric) author of the first Gothic novel, the house has been a popular tourist destination since it was first...
From: CRECS// on 5 Jun 2017

Toy shop Treatments

I have always been intrigued reading 17th and 18th century newspaper advertisements for medical remedies by the locations in which these products were sold and from whom they could be purchased. Looking at the drugs advertised in almanacs Louise Hill...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 24 May 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.