The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "engineering"

Your search for posts with tags containing engineering found 19 posts

Benjamin Franklin, Fireman

Benjamin Franklin was a man of many talents and titles. He was a printer, writer, scientist, inventor, politician, diplomat, and philosopher, among other things.... The post Benjamin Franklin, Fireman appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Thaddeus Kosciuszko: “Patron Saint of West Point”

In Douglas S. Freeman’s biography of Robert E. Lee, he noted: Corps activities took a certain amount of Lee’s time that winter. Kosciuszko was... The post Thaddeus Kosciuszko: “Patron Saint of West Point” appeared first on Journal of the American...

Review: Surveying in Early America

BOOK REVIEW: Surveying in Early America: The Point of Beginning, An Illustrated History by Dan Patterson and Clinton Terry (Cincinnati, OH: University of Cincinnati Press, 2021)... The post Review: Surveying in Early America appeared first on Journal...

This Week on Dispatches: David M. Griffin on the Brooklyn Line Forts of 1776

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews architect and JAR contributor David M. Griffin on his research to determine the possible appearance and... The post This Week on Dispatches: David M. Griffin on the Brooklyn Line Forts of 1776...

What Were the Brooklyn Line of Forts in 1776?

The planned capture of New York City in 1776 by British forces set the stage for what was to become the largest battle of... The post What Were the Brooklyn Line of Forts in 1776? appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Guns on Mount Defiance

Discussions about the American evacuation of Mount Independence and Fort Ticonderoga on the night of July 5, 1777 frequently address the question: could shot... The post Guns on Mount Defiance appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

In Defense of Mount Independence

It’s an understatement to say that the spring of 1776 had not gone well for the American army in Canada. After a campaign that... The post In Defense of Mount Independence appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Thomas Machin and His Chains

Thomas Machin claimed to be a British-trained engineer. His record of achievements in the United States suggests the claim was true. Most of his... The post Thomas Machin and His Chains appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Volunteer Overload: Foreign Support of the American Cause Prior to the French Alliance

Aside from being outmanned by the best army in the world when the American Revolution started, it was clear that the American forces were... The post Volunteer Overload: Foreign Support of the American Cause Prior to the French Alliance appeared first...

This Week on Dispatches: Jeff Dacus on the “Tower of Victory” at the Siege of Fort Watson

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Jeff Dacus on how Light Horse Harry Lee and Francis Marion were able to successfully capture... The post This Week on Dispatches: Jeff Dacus on the “Tower of...

The Fall of Fort Washington: The “Bunker Hill Effect”?

It was the one of the worst defeats suffered by the Americans during the War for Independence, certainly the worst over which George Washington... The post The Fall of Fort Washington: The “Bunker Hill Effect”? appeared first on Journal of...

Tower of Victory

As far back as the eleventh century B.C. attackers confronted by fortified cities and towns, castles, and forts, used siege towers to elevate their... The post Tower of Victory appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

What They Saw and Did at Yorktown’s Redoubts 9 and 1

Receiving orders from Sir Henry Clinton, British commander in chief in North America, Lt. Gen. Charles Cornwallis led his troops to a position between... The post What They Saw and Did at Yorktown’s Redoubts 9 and 10 appeared first on Journal of...

Robert Erskine, Surveyor-General of the Continental Army

Robert Erskine was born in Dumfermline, Scotland, to Ralph and Margaret Erskine on September 7, 1735. Ralph Erskine, being a Presbyterian minister, raised Robert... The post Robert Erskine, Surveyor-General of the Continental Army appeared first on Journal...

Bernard Romans and the First Attempt at Fortifying the Hudson River

Lord Stirling was not happy. The American brigadier general[1] was on a mission from George Washington to inspect the newly built fortifications in the Hudson... The post Bernard Romans and the First Attempt at Fortifying the Hudson River appeared...

This Week on Dispatchers: Frederic C. Detwiller on the Mysterious “Monsr Dubuq”

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews architect and preservationist Frederic C. Detwiller on the enigmatic French engineer, “Monsr Dubuq,” who was one of the... The post This Week on Dispatchers: Frederic...

Henry Champion: An Officer Resigns

Some people are drawn to flame, perhaps just a momentary fascination, but it can get one scolded, especially by the Commander-in-Chief. “I had just... The post Henry Champion: An Officer Resigns appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Finding Genres of Revolution in the Classroom

By Aaron R. Hanlon “Conceptual engineering” is the term philosophers use to categorize a sub-discipline concerned with refining and improving concepts like “knowledge,” “race,” or “health.” As a literary...
From: Age of Revolutions on 21 Jan 2019

Podcasting Revolution: A Revolution in Audio?

By Bryan A. Banks In 1902, the Italian engineer and inventor, Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937) successfully broadcasted a radio signal across the Atlantic Ocean. Just over one hundred years later, podcasts would be invented, building off the advent...
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 Oct 2016