The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing england found 1430 posts

September 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Price Three Shillings per single Dozen, Two Shillings and Sixpence per Dozen by the Quantity.” As fall arrived in 1771 advertisements for almanacs began appearing in newspapers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Sep 2021

A Cape Full of Color

So every year in early September we journey to Cape Cod on the weekend after Labor Day for my husband’s birthday. It is an odd time, just after “summer” is over and we have established our fall routines, and I always complain, but off to the Cape...
From: streets of salem on 15 Sep 2021

Cogswell’s Grant

Like several summers in the past, this was supposed to be my “Historic New England Summer” in which I made a determined attempt to visit and write about as many HNE houses as possible. I started out very close to home at the Phillips House, and then...
From: streets of salem on 6 Sep 2021

Regency “Privy” Matters: Feminine Hygiene, Bodily Functions, and Childbirth

After my previous article on Regency Women: Beauty Behind the Scenes, I realized that the things I really want to know more about concerning Jane Austen’s Regency women aren’t (and weren’t) discussed as much as other topics such as beauty regimes....
From: Jane Austen's World on 2 Sep 2021

The Comic History of Oliver Cromwell (1847) | Gilbert Abbot á Beckett

For Pen and Sword Books I am producing a new annotated edition of The Comic History of England (originally published in 1846). I thought I’d give readers a taste of what this fine book has to offer. The Famous Mr Punch In George W.M. Reynolds’s best-selling...

Summer Sunday Stroll in Salem

Sometimes I try to look at Salem as a tourist, a casual tourist taking a stroll, rather than with my historian/resident intensity. It doesn’t work for long, but I can pull it off for a few hours. I haven’t been home for very many weekends this summer,...
From: streets of salem on 10 Aug 2021

Regency Women: Beauty Behind the Scenes

Regency women went to great lengths to achieve an effortless, romantic look with long, flowing lines to their dresses and hairstyles. Even their dresses, which appeared to have little underneath, had several layers hidden below the surface. As with everything,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 9 Aug 2021

Ode to England (1855) | J. M.

The following poem titled ‘Ode to England’ was written in 1855 and published in the London Journal (8 September issue). It has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo. Of all nations of the earth Fair England, thou my place of birth, Art dearest,...

The cries of London

Title: The cries of London : for the instruction and amusement of good children. Published: York : Printed by J. Kendrew, Colliergate, [182-?] Catalog Record 646 820 C928 Acquired July 2020
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 26 Jul 2021

The Viking raid on Lindisfarne

The northern diaspora we call the age of the Vikings is testament to the mobility of early medieval Europe. So too is the fact that the most contemporary account we have of the viking raid on Lindisfarne of 8 June 793 comes from the court of Charlemagne...
From: Mathew Lyons on 15 Jul 2021

The Chartist History of England: Henry I (1849) | Edwin Roberts

Little is known of Edwin F. Roberts (1818–64), who is the author of this long-running series, originally titled A New History of England, and serialised in Reynolds’s Political Instructor between 1849 and 1850.[1] That he was a Chartist and republican...

Is there yet spirit in England? (1839) | Anonymous

The following poem was written anonymously and published in Hugh Williams’s National Songs and Poetical Pieces (1839). Its sympathies are with the struggle for democracy and the emerging Chartist movement. Is he fit for this world, or a better...

A Chartist History of England (1849-50): William Rufus | Edwin Roberts

Little is known of Edwin F. Roberts (1818–64), who is the author of this long-running series, originally titled A New History of England, and serialised in Reynolds’s Political Instructor between 1849 and 1850.[1] That he was a Chartist and republican...

A Chartist History of England (1849–50) | Edwin Roberts

Little is known of Edwin F. Roberts (1818–64), who is the author of this long-running series, originally titled A New History of England, and serialised in Reynolds’s Political Instructor between 1849 and 1850. That he was a Chartist is beyond doubt,...

A Bush Garden

Last week I spent a day in Kennebunkport, a town long associated with the Bush family because of Walker’s Point, which was purchased by President H.W. Bush’s maternal great- and grandfather after the turn of the last century. The usual congregation...
From: streets of salem on 23 Jun 2021

Ragnar’s Death Song | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK.[1] The History Channel’s Vikings is one of the most popular medievalist television series to date. In the United States alone, the series has, as recently as its fifth series, managed...

Observations on Several Acts of Parliament

The Townshend Revenue Act of 1767 awoke Americans to the fact that import duties for the purpose of revenue were taxes just as much... The post Observations on Several Acts of Parliament appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Phillips House

I can’t believe that I’ve been blogging here for eleven+ years and have not featured 1) the only house museum; 2) the only house belonging to Historic New England; and 3) the only house which was (partially) moved to its site on the street where I...
From: streets of salem on 8 Jun 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.