The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing event found 2504 posts

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From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 21 May 2020

CfA: UPenn virtual seminar in early modern philosophy

*Call for Abstracts* In an effort to encourage philosophical engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic, we invite submissions from graduate students for University of Pennsylvania’s virtual seminar in Early Modern Philosophy. The seminar will be conducted...
From: Spinoza Research Network on 20 May 2020

When Hancock Moved on Mein

John Mein arrived in Boston from Scotland in 1764. He first set up a shop with Robert Sandeman, though he wasn’t a member of the Sandemanian sect.The next year, Mein took over the London Book Store on King Street, formerly co-owned by James Rivington....
From: Boston 1775 on 18 May 2020

Another Boston Town Meeting, “all in very good order”

On 15 May 1770, 250 years ago today, Bostonians convened in Faneuil Hall for another town meeting session. That gathering was meant to finish up some business from the week before, as discussed starting here, and the year before.The first order of business...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 May 2020

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From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 15 May 2020

Studying the Schoolmasters’ Salaries

Toward the end of their 8 May 1770 town meeting, Bostonians turned to approving salaries for the town’s schoolteachers.There were five town schools—two grammar or Latin schools and three writing schools. However, not all the teachers were...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 May 2020

“Strict adherance to the design of the Townˇ

At 3:00 P.M. on 8 May 1770, after their midday dinners, the white, propertied men of Boston returned to Faneuil Hall to resume their town meeting.Having elected their representatives to the Massachusetts General Court, they named a committee to write...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 May 2020

After James Otis “behaved very madly’

On 8 May 1770, 250 years ago today, Bostonians gathered for one of their annual town meetings.Every March, the white men of the town elected its selectmen and other officials for the coming year. Every May, a smaller section of those white men, those...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 May 2020

Plague and pageantry

The project team are currently working remotely whilst archives and libraries are closed due to the COVID pandemic. Our project covers a period in history when epidemic disease was a regular event, especially in overcrowded London. The city’s population...

No May round-up

Since none of the exhibits I have on my tracking sheet will be able to open until at least June 1 and I didn’t have any books on my list, I’ll skip a round-up this month. I have links to some online info about some upcoming exhibits (eventually)...
From: TudorHistory.org Blog on 5 May 2020

“Jury went out after noon and did not agree all night”

On 20 Apr 1770, Benjamin Lynde, acting chief justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court, wrote in his diary:Fair. Richardson and Wilmot’s tryal, begun morn. and Jury went out after noon and did not agree all night.As recounted yesterday, Lynde...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Apr 2020

Earth Day Turns 50 with a Massive Livestream Event

As the world fights to bring the COVID-19 pandemic under control, another crisis looms. In late 2018, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned that if we want to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, we need to...
From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 20 Apr 2020

The Trial of Ebenezer Richardson

On 20 Apr 1770, 250 years ago today, Ebenezer Richardson went on trial for the killing of young Christopher Seider.This was just short of two months after the fatal confrontation at Richardson’s house in the North End, but for the Boston Whigs that...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Apr 2020

Canadian History After COVID-19

Denis McKim Thomas Paine likened the American Revolution to the deluge. In much the same way that God had hit the “reset button” on history itself through the flood recounted in Genesis, the United States had initiated a new epoch by revolting...
From: Borealia on 20 Apr 2020

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From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 17 Apr 2020

Ebenezer Richardson’s New Attorney

On 17 Apr 1770, 250 years ago today, the Massachusetts Superior Court convened to try Ebenezer Richardson and George Wilmot for murdering young Christopher Seider.At least, the court tried to. The attorney whom the judges had ordered to represent Richardson,...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Apr 2020

Great Lives, the perfect pandemic podcast

Donald Wright When we received instructions to distance and isolate, I called my 92-year old mother who lives alone in another province. She seemed to be taking the pandemic in stride. “I survived the Depression, the war, and the energy crisis,”...
From: Borealia on 13 Apr 2020

“The Town make choice of a proper Person to deliver an Oration”

Yesterday I described how Bostonians commemorated the first anniversary of the Boston Massacre in 1771, including Dr. Thomas Young delivering a political oration in the Manufactory.Six days later, on Monday, 11 March, Boston had its first town meeting...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Apr 2020

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From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 10 Apr 2020

Screening and discussion: RSC Hamlet on RTE2 and Cyclone Rep Q&A

Cyclone Rep, Ireland’s leading Shakespeare Theatre-in-Education Company, is trying to help Leaving Certificate students during these difficult times, coming up with interesting new online ways to interact and make the works of William Shakespeare...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 9 Apr 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.