The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "evidence"

Your search for posts with tags containing evidence found 9 posts

March 7

GUEST CURATOR: Olivia Burke What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (March 7, 1769). “The best New-England Flour of Mustard.” In “A Taste for Mustard: An Archaeological Examination of a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Mar 2019

From Blue Lobsters to Friendly Giants: Visual Representations of the Police, c.1840–188

Guest post by Jane M. Card; 27 August 2018. Images from the past are never to be taken at face value since, made according to contemporary visual conventions and artistic tastes, they reflect not objective reality but contemporary opinions about reality....
From: Legal History Miscellany on 27 Aug 2018

Before Shakespeare at The National Archives (The Theatre)

BOOK FOR OUR TALK AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES, 1 AUGUST, HERE Tucked away somewhere in the temperature-controlled archival store rooms of The National Archives is an equity suit in the Court of Exchequer that records a series of trespass complaints. ...
From: Before Shakespeare on 26 Jul 2018

Emotions in Legal Practices Conference: Some Thoughts

  Engraving of Gilbert and Sullivan’s Trial by Jury. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.By Hugh Dillon, Deputy State Coroner, New South Wales  Every day of the week, in trial courts all over the world, juries are told to ‘hearken...
From: Histories of Emotion on 17 Nov 2016

From Data to Evidence (d2e) Conference Reflections

Fraser and Iona report: Six members of the Linguistic DNA team were present at the recent d2e conference held by the VARIENG research unit at the University of Helsinki, Finland. The focus of the conference was on tools and methodologies employed...
From: Linguistic DNA on 11 Nov 2015

No Primary Evidence To Support Brick Tea In The Colonies.

If anyone should have documentation on the use of brick tea in the colonies, I would be very interested to see it.Keith. March 2015.17th Century Tea Caddy.18thcentury tea in the colonies.COLONIAL TEA TRADESome Thoughts on the China, Tea and Coffee Trade...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 31 Mar 2015

Evidence-Based Argument: Shakespeare and the Common Core

Guest post by Josh Cabat Over the past few weeks, I have had the opportunity to attend both a week-long workshop on reading strategies at Teachers College and the week-long AP English Language and Composition prep course sponsored by the College Board. In...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 24 Jul 2014

Cargoes of Women: A Numbers Game

This is part three of 'Cargoes of Women'. For part one, please click here. For part two, please click here. At the heart of the Victorian surplus-women-problem debate was the 1851 British census. In this mighty document lay the seemingly irrefutable...

The Emotional Life of Recipes

By Montserrat Cabré Reading Elaine Leong’s January blog entry about technologies of recipe collecting, as well as her New Year’s resolution to start filling a years-long empty recipe box, reminded me of an issue I have been thinking about...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Mar 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.