The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "family"

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Your search for posts with tags containing family found 497 posts

Homesickness: emotions, families, and nations

In a brief visit to Manchester Art Gallery – snatched during a gap in the conference my husband was attending – I was stopped in my tracks by Benoit Aubard’s Homesick (2018). Aubard’s spray-painted graffiti style duvet...
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 20 Aug 2019

The Measure of Ingredients in Early Modern Recipes

By Juliet Claxton Modern cookery books list recipe ingredients that are carefully weighed out using standardized units of measurement. It is precise calibration that allows for a recipe to be replicated with accuracy, even by a novice cook. Early modern...
From: The Recipes Project on 13 Aug 2019

The Gold State Coach

LONDON, January 8. Yesterday the old State Coach, built for King George I and the Carriages of his late Majesty, given by the late Master of the Horse to the Servants, were sold at Bever’s Repository; it is remarkable the Gold Lace of the State...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Jul 2019

Theatre: “Twelfth Night” in Roscommon

This July, the Pilgrim Players return to the Bishop’s Palace in Ballaghaderreen, Co Roscommon, with a new production of Twelfth Night. The company aims to make accessible and vibrant theatre not just for ardent fans, but for all comers. Built in...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 12 Jul 2019

The scramble for a royal heir

Although George III had 15 children, and all but two of them survived to adulthood, grandchildren – at least legitimate ones – were thin on the ground. In 1817, when the Prince Regent’s daughter, Princess Charlotte of Wales died in childbirth...
From: All Things Georgian on 2 Jul 2019

Vegetable Soup: A Friendship Revealed by a Recipe

Nikki Yutuc The Margaret Chase Smith Recipes Research Collaborative is an interdisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff at the University of Maine. Members represent a wide range of disciplines including history, sociology, folklore, anthropology,...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Jun 2019

Exploring Class and Social Ties in Chocolate Crunch Cookies

Caitlin Hillery The Margaret Chase Smith Recipes Research Collaborative is an interdisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff at the University of Maine. Members represent a wide range of disciplines including history, sociology, folklore, anthropology,...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Jun 2019

Emotional Bodies in Context, a Symposium at The University of Adelaide 

By Meagan Nattrass, The University of Adelaide The Oxford English Dictionary defines the body as ‘the physical structure, including the bones, flesh, and organs, of a person or an animal,’ yet the Emotional Bodies in Context symposium recognised...
From: Histories of Emotion on 14 Jun 2019

Lobster Newburg: Margaret Chase Smith’s Promotion of a Maine Ingredient

Nicole Ritchey The Margaret Chase Smith Recipes Research Collaborative is an interdisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff at the University of Maine. Members represent a wide range of disciplines including history, sociology, folklore, anthropology,...
From: The Recipes Project on 13 Jun 2019

Cheese Salad (Chilled): A Taste of Nostalgia

Kate Follansbee The Margaret Chase Smith Recipes Research Collaborative is an interdisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff at the University of Maine. Members represent a wide range of disciplines including history, sociology, folklore, anthropology,...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Jun 2019

The First Duke of Edinburgh

In 1726, a new title was created in the peerage, the Duke of Edinburgh, and the recipient was Prince Frederick Louis, George I’s grandson. The new duke was second in the line of succession to the throne behind his father, George Augustus who was,...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Jun 2019

King George III’s 70th birthday

King George III celebrated his 70th birthday on 4 June 1808. George III on on of Windsor Castle’s terraces; Peter Edward Stroehling; Royal Collection Trust The king was losing his eyesight and, because of this, wasn’t present at his birthday...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Jun 2019

Smothered Beef: The Role of Meat in Margaret Chase Smith’s Foodways

Emma Bragdon The Margaret Chase Smith Recipes Research Collaborative is an interdisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff at the University of Maine. Members represent a wide range of disciplines including history, sociology, folklore, anthropology,...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Jun 2019

Cooking Up New Ideas: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Research through Recipes

Rachel A. Snell The Margaret Chase Smith Recipes Research Collaborative (MCSRRC) is an interdisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff who are passionate and curious about the role of food, recipes, and cooking in politics and public life; and...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Jun 2019

Montpelier Tea Gardens, Cricket and Uncle George

Walworth Road, 1779 courtesy of the Cuming Collection During the late 1780s, my 4xgreat uncle, George Aram settled in Newington, Surrey after having left the Norfolk coast for business opportunities in London. By 1793 he was a licensed victualler working...
From: Abraham Adcock on 1 Jun 2019

Princess Charlotte of Wales’ account books

Amongst the wonderful resource of the ‘George III Papers’ which are now in the public domain, we came across some early account books for the teenager, Princess Charlotte of Wales, which make fascinating reading. Perhaps it’s just us,...
From: All Things Georgian on 30 May 2019

Exploring Gender Roles through a Recipe for “French Pancakes”

By Hannah Meidahl The Margaret Chase Smith Recipes Research Collaborative is an interdisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff at the University of Maine. Members represent a wide range of disciplines including history, sociology, folklore, anthropology,...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 May 2019

May 28

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Supplement to the New-York Journal (May 25, 1769). “Family Physician, or Primitive Physic, just published.” The supplement that accompanied the May 25, 1769, edition...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 May 2019

Maine’s Favorite Daughter and Blueberries

By Harley Rogers The Margaret Chase Smith Recipes Research Collaborative is an interdisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff at the University of Maine. Members represent a wide range of disciplines including history, sociology, folklore, anthropology,...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 May 2019

Leverett Family Petticoat Returns to Colonial Williamsburg

The Leverett family quilted petticoat, reproduced from a pattern created by pricking the design onto muslin, has been returned to the makers at the Margaret Hunter Shop, Milliners and Mantuamakers at Colonial Williamsburg. The pricking was in the...
From: SilkDamask on 27 May 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.