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Your search for posts with tags containing farming found 71 posts

Thorson on “Stone Walls on Minute Man,” 27 Feb.

On Saturday, 27 February, the Friends of Minute Man National Park will host its free Winter Lecture, this time beamed through the walls of our own homes. This year Prof. Robert Thorson will speak about “The Stone Walls of Minute Man National Park.”...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2021

Legal Trouble in Pembroke

Back on Thanksgiving, I mentioned that the Rev. Kilborn Whitman (1765-1835, shown here) delivered the holiday sermon in Quincy, Massachusetts, in 1798. I also noted that Whitman decided not to get involved in the Quincy Congregationalist meeting’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jan 2021

The Electoral College as a “Problem Half-Solved”

With another Presidential coming up, it’s time for a topic I’ve addressed on this site since 2006: how the Electoral College can interfere with the consent of the governed, and how claims for its benefits fall apart on examination.This time...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Oct 2020

“I have removed H——n out of the house”

As I quoted yesterday, in July 1775 John Adams sent his wife Abigail confirmation in writing that their tenant hand, an “old Man” named Hayden, should move out of the rooms he occupied in one of their Braintree houses. Hayden had refused Abigail’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jul 2020

Meanwhile, out in Marlborough…

One of the Sestecentennial stories I’ve neglected because I don’t have solid dates for all the events is the way the people of Marlborough joined in the non-importation movement by pressuring local businessman Henry Barnes.Barnes was born...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Jun 2020

“Pointing to Mr. Jacksons Shop”

On Thursday, 8 Feb 1770, two and half centuries ago today, the Boston Whigs tried a new tactic in their pressure campaign against shopkeepers who were still selling imported goods. According to the anonymous witness sending reports to Customs Collector...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Feb 2020

The Natick Community and the Watertown Dam

Last month the Junto blog shared an interesting essay by Zachary M. Bennett, “Damming Fish and Indians: Starvation and Dispossession in Colonial Massachusetts.”Bennett writes:Compared to other Native Americans in southern New England, the...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jul 2019

Making hay while the sun shines...

Is this an example of making hay while the sun shines?  (Not the two workers, but the two at the back of the picture enjoying each other & the shade of the haystack.) The expression dates back many centuries, and has changed little in form....
From: 17th-century American Women on 25 Jun 2013

Taking a New Look at the Saratoga Battlefield

The Saratogian reports on a four-week project at Saratoga National Historical Park in which military veterans help archeologists search for evidence of the battle there in 1777.This project uses G.P.S. (Global Positioning System) and Li.D.A.R. (Light...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jun 2019

Serfin’ U.S.A. with Benjamin Franklin

Yesterday I examined the facts and logic of a recent USA Today opinion essay, “Killing the Electoral College Means Rural Americans Would Be Serfs” by Trent England. I found them unconvincing.The portions of the essay that invoke history are...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 May 2019

Upcoming Events in Charlestown and Weston

Here are a couple of interesting Revolutionary history happenings in the next few days.On Thursday, 25 April, the Bunker Hill Museum will host a talk by Salem Maritime National Historic Site historian Emily Murphy titled “‘I Am An Honest Woman’:...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Apr 2019

Inland Icelanders Burned Whale Bones for Warmth

https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/inland-icelanders-burned-whale-bones-for-warmth/By K.N.Smith.An archaeological find shows that whale bones were sometimes imported inland to use as fuel.https://minds.wisconsin.edu/bitstream/handle/1793/6671/Experiments%20in%20Bone%20Burning.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 28 Mar 2019

James Watson and the Tea Party

Yesterday I quoted Cyrus Eaton’s History of Thomaston, Rockland, and South Thomaston, Maine (1865) as a source about Benjamin Burton’s stories of the Boston Tea Party.Eaton also wrote:The other resident of this place present at this celebrated...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Dec 2018

Tracking Down Pvt. Richard Eames

As soon as the British regiments arrived in Boston, soldiers began to desert. Don Hagist of British Soldiers, American Revolution has found that desertions went up just before and after a move—perhaps because of higher discontent, perhaps because...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Nov 2018

Gange in 17C & 18C English Society

"Englishman Robert Hooke (1635-1703), a natural philosopher and architect whose diverse achievements included creating the balance spring used in pocket watches and, as the author of the landmark book Micrographia, coined the word cell for biological...
From: 18th-century American Women on 8 Oct 2013

“The house was new and pretty”

Brought up in the high society of the French court at Versailles; married at 17 to an aristocrat and soldier, with a promising diplomatic career ahead of him; serving the Queen as a lady-in-waiting; HENRIETTE-LUCY DILLON GOUVERNET DE LA TOUR DU PIN (1770-1853)...
From: In the Words of Women on 14 Jun 2018

The Final Fate of Jefferson’s Four-Horned Ram

On 23 Feb 1808, a week after young Alexander Kerr, Jr., died from being gored by a four-horned ram on the grounds of the Presidential mansion, Thomas Jefferson made plans to move that animal to Monticello.Jefferson wrote to his plantation manager, Edmund...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Mar 2018

President Jefferson’s Flock

Thomas Jefferson was always interested in improving American agriculture, and his own farming enterprises, though he wasn’t always successful. In 1794, after stepping down as Secretary of State, Jefferson had his managers at Monticello buy a flock...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Mar 2018

The Southern Colonies

Slaves Working in 17C Virginia Unknown artist c 1670 WikimediaIn contrast to New England and the middle colonies, the Southern colonies were predominantly rural settlements.  By the late 17th century, Virginia's and Maryland's economic and social...
From: 17th-century American Women on 7 Mar 2018

Saved by the Potato

Last year I got out of my comfort zone and looked into the Irish Potato Famine of the 1840s for a public-history project. So I was primed when I saw a mention of this paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research. It’s titled “The Long-run...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jan 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.