The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "field"

Showing 61 - 80 of 443

Your search for posts with tags containing field found 443 posts

“No objection to going where Your Husband does”

By 1789, John George Briesler had been working for John Adams (who always spelled his name “Brisler”) for five years. The newly elected Vice President had Briesler accompany him to New York and then Philadelphia during the Washington administration....
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Feb 2019

“She had no Idea of being with child”

On 10 Feb 1788, Abigail Adams wrote from London to her sister Mary Cranch in Braintree that she was “very near when I am to quit this country.” It was one day short of four years since Adams had first written about bringing John Briesler to...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Feb 2019

Abigail Adams Finds “an honest faithfull Man Servant”

On 11 Feb 1784, Abigail Adams was preparing to join her husband John in Europe after years apart.She wrote to John about hiring household staff:I am lucky too in being able to supply myself with an honest faithfull Man Servant. I do not know but you may...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Feb 2019

“Entertainments” for the 2019 Dublin Seminar

This summer’s Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife is on the topic of “Entertainments at Taverns and Long Rooms in New England, 1700-1900.” The seminar organizers are now accepting proposals for papers, presentations, and performances...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Feb 2019

Battlefield Plants and their Uses

In 2015 we wrote a blog post describing the uses for certain plants found on Culloden Battlefield, with particular focus on their medicinal properties; here are four more plants that can be seen at Culloden, along with information detailing what they...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 2 Feb 2019

“Next Door to Brazen Head”

Yesterday I related how the brazier James Jackson came to Boston from London and by December 1734 opened a shop called the Brazen Head, after its brass-covered sign.That November, Benjamin Franklin directed a letter “To Mr. Henry Price At the...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Dec 2018

The Philadelphia Jewess

Fourteen young Tory ladies were selected by Major John André as the “foremost in youth, beauty and fashion” in Philadelphia to participate in the Meschianza in May of 1778, a tribute to retiring General William Howe. Among them was...
From: In the Words of Women on 15 Dec 2018

Hippocras, or spiced wine

Hippocras is a kind of spiced wine. As Paul Lukacs writes in his book Inventing Wine, wine drinkers at all levels of society in medieval and early modern Europe drank spiced wines, “Spices not only would disguise a wine beginning to turn bad...
From: Cooking in the Archives on 10 Dec 2018

Art Detectives: William Hornby of Hornby’s Bank in Gainsborough

I’ve long been intrigued by a portrait on the Art UK website of a rather dishevelled and – quite frankly – eccentric figure, which, so the label claims, depicts William Hornby (incorrectly labelled as Hornsby) of Hornby’s Bank...
From: All Things Georgian on 27 Nov 2018

Cave Dwellers of Mansfield, Nottinghamshire

Known as the ‘rock houses’ they are a well-known feature of the town of Mansfield, Nottinghamshire in the East Midlands and only a few miles away from Newstead Abbey, home of Lord Byron. A View in Newstead Park, belonging to the Rt. Hon. Lord...
From: All Things Georgian on 8 Nov 2018

Review: La donna che amava i colori

By Barbara Di Gennaro Splendore “They [the Italians] seem to commence everything with spirit to get tired of it before it is finished.”[1] Mary Marrifield’s letters from Italy to her husband are full of charming–and if you are...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Oct 2018

Book Chapters: Graizbord & Lehfeldt in “Conversions”

Simon Ditchfield and Helen Smith, eds. Conversions: Gender and Religious Change in Early Modern Europe (Manchester University Press, 2017. David Graizbord, “The quiet conversion of a ‘Jewish’ woman in eighteenthcentury Spain.”...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 9 Oct 2018

Dido Elizabeth Belle – an update

As many of our readers are aware, over the past few months we have been researching the life of Dido Elizabeth Belle and her family in addition to our usual eclectic mix of posts. Some information about her life has now been in the public domain for a...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Oct 2018

Sir John Floyer’s Pulse-watch

A longer version of this article first appeared in Staffordshire Life November 2017 – Sara L0012393 “The physician’s pulse watch”, Floyer, 1707-1710 Credit: Wellcome Library, London.  Most of us are familiar with having...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 3 Oct 2018

Talk About Change: LDNA at Festival of the Mind

Last weekend, Linguistic DNA & friends took over the Spiegeltent in Sheffield city centre, as part of the University’s Festival of the Mind. Spiegeltents are a Belgian invention–tents decorated internally with mirrors, creating the perfect...
From: Linguistic DNA on 28 Sep 2018

Contrasting Reactions to the Massachusetts Convention

Massachusetts towns had a range of responses to Boston’s invitation in September 1768 to come to a Convention in Faneuil Hall and discuss the province’s grievances. The 26 Sept 1768 Boston Gazette proudly ran a dispatch from Petersham in Worcester...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Sep 2018

Visiting Stoneleigh Abbey, by Rachel Dodge

On a visit to see my relatives in Warwick, England, last month, I stopped at Stoneleigh Abbey. It was late in the day and the house tours had concluded, so I purchased a garden ticket and stepped through the wide, low door from the Gatehouse into the...
From: Jane Austen's World on 21 Sep 2018

September 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (September 21, 1768).“Whoever is inclinable to purchase the said sloop may treat with Mrs. Germain at her house in Savannah.” The September 21, 1768,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Sep 2018

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.