The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing field found 426 posts

Grave markers at Culloden

When people visit Culloden Battlefield most will inevitably head out across the moor and stand in front of the large memorial cairn in the centre of the field. Surrounding the cairn are most, but not all, of the grave markers on the field so it seems...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 19 Jan 2018

New Book: Cañizares-Esguerra, Entangled Empires

Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, ed, Entangled Empires: The Anglo-Iberian Atlantic, 1500-1830 (Penn, 2018). Contributors: Ernesto Bassi, Benjamin Breen, Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, Bradley Dixon, Kristie Flannery, Eliga Gould, Michael Guasco, April...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 11 Jan 2018

Shakespeare and Jane Austen

Jane Austen Before 2017 comes to an end, it’s appropriate to mark it as the two-hundredth anniversary of the death of literary giant and Shakespeare-lover Jane Austen. She died, aged only 41, in 1817, in Winchester. Her admiration of Shakespeare...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 30 Dec 2017

A Bit Behind the Scenes

As we turn ten years old here’s a few things you may not know about Culloden Battlefield Visitor Centre. As you go through the centre you walk the same path as the Jacobites. The centre is designed so that the first corridor takes you on a...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 15 Dec 2017

Top 10 FAQs in the last 10 years

The current Culloden Battlefield Visitor Centre first opened its doors 10 years ago this month. To mark the 10 years we thought we would share the tope 10 most common FAQs. Who were the Jacobites? The Jacobites are followers of the exiled...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 8 Dec 2017

Washington’s Encampment at Verplanck 178

Having recently visited the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia and written about it in this post, I am tempted to return to see a special limited-run exhibit there from January 13 to February 19. On display will be a newly discovered seven-foot-long...
From: In the Words of Women on 5 Dec 2017

Audiences, Immigration and Belonging in Elizabethan Theatres: Putting the archive into performance

Who visited the Elizabethan playhouses? What did it mean to have non-English characters being played on stage? What does dramatic engagement with issues of immigration, identity, and belonging tell us about sixteenth-century theatre? Earlier this month...
From: Before Shakespeare on 1 Dec 2017

The Brodie Sword

To celebrate the return of the Brodie Sword, from display at the National Museum of Scotland’s Jacobites exhibition, we thought we would re-share the story of this intriguing sword. Sword and Symbols With the recent exhibition at the National...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 24 Nov 2017

Give us our Daily Bread

Bread, a staple of part of the diet today as much as it was in the Georgian era. Hardly something controversial or so you would think. Kitchen Interior with Still Life by Samuel Smith; Bury Art MuseumIn 1757 the weight of a penny loaf was set to reflect...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 Nov 2017

Alex Shepard, ‘Childcare, family and economy in early modern Britain’

In November Alex Shepard, Professor of Gender History at the University of Glasgow, came to Sheffield to share her thoughts on her new project, on childcare, family and economy in early modern Britain. This project is in its infancy, but builds on Alex’s...
From: SCEMS on 20 Nov 2017

Audiences, Immigration, and Belonging: Strangers in Finsbury

On the 19th November 2017, the TIDE project and Before Shakespeare are hosting a workshop exploring the diverse audiences of Elizabethan playhouses and their surrounding neighbourhoods, based at the University of Liverpool’s London campus, 33 Finsbury...
From: Before Shakespeare on 3 Nov 2017

Guest Post: Recap of Race, Memory, and the Digital Humanities Symposium

Ravynn Stringfield is an MA/PhD student in American Studies at the College of William & Mary. Her work considers representation of Blackness in comics and graphic novels through literary and historical lens, and though she hesitates to label herself...
From: The Junto on 1 Nov 2017

“Religious Spaces” at the 2018 Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife

Next year’s Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife will take place on 22-24 June 2018 at Historic Deerfield. The subject will be “Religious Spaces: Our Vanishing Landmarks.”Here’s the call for papers and similar material in that...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Oct 2017

The Ringers of Launcells Tower

The Ringers of Launcells Tower; Frederick Smallfield; Royal Institution of CornwallWe came across this piece of art whilst researching the heroine of our latest book, Mrs Rachel Charlotte Williams Biggs. The painting was inspired by a poem called ‘The...
From: All Things Georgian on 24 Oct 2017

Kemble Whatley, Carpenter

When George Warren died, he was replaced as carpenter at Kew by Kemble Whatley. Their situations were quite different. The Warrens were a local family with extensive ties to the area and a modest carpentry business.  Kemble Whatley was a wealthy...
From: Kirby and his world on 19 Oct 2017

Lake of Flowers

'The Miracle of the Immobility of Santa Lucia' Leandro Bassano, using Florentine lakes. In the final part of Antonio Neri's 1612 book on glassmaking, [1] he presents several recipes that are devoted to pigments for painting. His intention for including...
From: Conciatore on 18 Oct 2017

“The concourse of spectators was greater than we ever remember”

Earlier in the week I wrote about the funeral of Christopher Seider. The merchant John Rowe stated in his diary, “I am very sure two thousand people attended his Funerall.” That would have been one of every eight people in Boston.John Adams...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Oct 2017

Andy Kesson and Before Shakespeare

Sheffield postgraduate Cat Evans reports on the lecture, ‘Peculiar Houses: Building public theatres in Elizabethan London’ given by Dr Andy Kesson (University of Roehampton, London) on 5 October 2017, and on the masterclass he gave the following...
From: SCEMS on 13 Oct 2017

Doors of Deerfield

Last weekend I drove out to the Pioneer Valley and spent some time at Historic Deerfield, an outdoor museum of eighteenth-century houses located (and assembled) all along one street in the midst of fertile farmland. The museum was founded in 1952, and...
From: streets of salem on 11 Oct 2017

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.