The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "fire"

Showing 1 - 20 of 342

Your search for posts with tags containing fire found 342 posts

How “the House was consumed” in 1747

On the morning of 9 Dec 1747, as I described yesterday, Bostonians discovered that their Town House was on fire.In that month the brick building in the center of town was hosting a session of the Massachusetts General Court.According to a legislative...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jun 2020

“The publick Damage sustain’d by this sad Disaster”

The 10 Dec 1747 Boston News-Letter reported:Yesterday Morning between 6 & 7 o’ Clock were were exceedingly surprized by a most terrible Fire which broke out at the Court-House in this Town, whereby that spacious and beautiful Building, except...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jun 2020

‘Covent Garden: The 17th Century West End’—A Guest Post by John Pilkington

Author John Pilkington (@_JohnPilkington) writes about the colourful and seedy side of Covent Garden in the 17th Century.
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 18 May 2020

Fire Buckets and the Fenno Family

The Skinner auctioneers blog offers Christopher D. Fox’s detailed discussion of firefighting and leather fire buckets in Boston. In particular, Fox profiles one maker of those buckets:While there were certainly a number of merchants in Boston from...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 May 2020

How much is your ‘Wearing Apparel’ worth? and other miscellany

Insurance policy registers are one of my favourite sources. Whilst conducting research for my PhD, I mined the earliest registers of the Sun Fire Office Insurance Company to locate women in business in London (and the wider metropolis) from 1710 onwards....
From: A Fashionable Business on 25 Apr 2020

The Slings and Arrows of Outrageous Misfortune: The Fall of Fort Motte

The Revolutionary War in the Carolinas after the fall of Charleston was a great arena of war with hundreds of small battlefields. Some were... The post The Slings and Arrows of Outrageous Misfortune: The Fall of Fort Motte appeared first on Journal of...

“Not to trust the said boy out of his sight”

After young Charles Bourgate accused both his master, Edward Manwaring, and his master’s alibi witness, John Munro, of participating in the Boston Massacre, as I related here, Manwaring summoned “a third person who happened to be that Evening...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Mar 2020

The Use Of Firearms By Minors Australia - The Loose Cannon

My eldest son with a .32 caliber flintlock rifle when he was a youngster.The Use Of Firearms By Minors Australia - The Loose Cannon http://www.sportingshooter.com.au/latest/the-use-of-firearms-by-minors-australia-the-loose-cannon
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 3 Mar 2020

The Glassmaker's Salamander

From Michael Maier's 1617 book of emblems.The salamander was thought to be born of fire.If one can say that hot-glass workers have a mascot, it is without any doubt the salamander. Since ancient times, this lizard-like, poisonous skinned amphibian...
From: Conciatore on 28 Feb 2020

Ships, Fire, and Boston’s George Mason

In January 1770, as I mentioned back here, two sea captains were in Boston from Glasgow, trying to commission four new ships.But because of the non-importation boycott against the Townshend duties, Boston’s business community wouldn’t let...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jan 2020

Raid on Isaac Hatfield’s House

As I described yesterday, in January 1780 Capts. Samuel Lockwood and Samuel Keeler of the Connecticut militia attacked the home of Isaac Hatfield, Jr., in Morrisania, New York. Hatfield (1748-1822) had been born in America to a substantial farming family...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2020

“Where BOSTONIA lifts her spires”

It’s a Boston 1775 tradition to share a “carrier verse” at the turn of the year. Traditionally those were poems written and printed by newspaper apprentices as a way to cadge tips from their customers. Often those apprentices commented...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Jan 2020

November 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-Hampshire Gazette (November 10, 1769). “He will also tend School in the Evenings … if reasonable Encouragement be allowed for keeping a Fire.” In November...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Nov 2019

Book Review: ‘Entertaining Mr Pepys’ by Deborah Swift

Entertaining Mr Pepys is the third and final chapter of Deborah Swift’s trilogy on that most famous naval administrator/diarist of the late seventeenth century: Samuel Pepys. That said, it can be read as a standalone work – although I read...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 13 Sep 2019

The Glassmaker's Salamander

From Michael Maier's 1617 book of emblems.The salamander was thought to be born of fire.If one can say that hot-glass workers have a mascot, it is without any doubt the salamander. Since ancient times, this lizard-like, poisonous skinned amphibian...
From: Conciatore on 14 Aug 2019

A Plea for Relief after the Great Fire of 1794

The State Library of Massachusetts is spotlighting, both on the web and at the State House, a broadside from 1794. Its blog posting explains:This month, we’re displaying a broadside that was distributed as an “Appeal from Boston for Aid after...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Aug 2019

A New Tavern Opened in Brunswick Town

Archeologists from East Carolina University announced that they are exploring the site of an eighteenth-century tavern in Brunswick Town, North Carolina, once capital of that colony. The building was located by a student using ground-penetrating radar....
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jul 2019

There is Light

A large part of the frustration many in Salem felt at the removal of Salem’s archival heritage contained in the collections of the Peabody Essex Museum’s Phillips Library in 2017 was due to the fact that so little of these materials had been...
From: streets of salem on 25 Jun 2019

In search of the middle…

…it is now requisite (and, God, in justice, will so have it) that the stout, faithful, and prudent Citizens, and the men of middling Fortunes, who were heretofore scorned and oppressed, should be called into Office and employment…’George...
From: Middling Culture on 20 Jun 2019

Jubilee Fair

“View of the Jubilee Fair in Hyde Park; in foreground to left a small stage erected with a band playing and jesters performing, a small crowd stands in front, a few tents in central foreground with signs such as “Duke of Wellington Whitbreads...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 4 Jun 2019

Page 1 of 18123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.