The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing food found 824 posts

Waste Not, Want Not: Kelp, Cans and MAP: Packaging as Food Preservation

By Anne Murcott Starting work on a history of food packaging some years ago, rapidly led to the realisation that it is also a history of a very long list of other things, including food preservation.  But preparing a contribution for a conference...
From: The Recipes Project on 13 Feb 2020

Waste Not, Want Not: Interpreting Thrift through Victorian Food Writing

By Lindsay Middleton When you use ‘thrift’ in conversations today, the word carries connotations of frugality and, perhaps, tightfistedness. In mid- to late-nineteenth century, however, the meaning of ‘thrift’ was being reinvigorated....
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Feb 2020

Waste Not, Want Not: Physics and Fruitcakes

By Simon Werrett In 1767, the Winchester writer Ann Shackleford gave a recipe for clear fruit cakes in her Modern Art of Cookery Improved (1767). A candied fruit juice should be placed ‘upon glass plates, or pieces of glass’ and dried in a...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 Feb 2020

Waste Not, Want Not: An Introduction to Histories of Food Waste, Thrift, and Sustainability.

By Eleanor Barnett and Katrina Moseley As awareness of global climate and humanitarian issues increases, a growing number of us are seeking ways to grow, buy, and eat food more sustainably – by, for example, using food sharing apps to prevent food...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Feb 2020

The Frugal Houswife Available in America 177

.Pehr Hilleström (Swedish artist, 1732-1816) A Maid Taking Soup from a Cauldron A cookbook available in the early American republic wasSusannah CarterThe Frugal Housewife, or Complete Woman Cook;...Also The Making of English Wines. New York: G. &...
From: 18th-century American Women on 1 Feb 2020

The Art of Cookery by Hanna Glassie

.The first American edition of The Art of Cookery by Hannah Glasse was published in Alexandria, Virginia in 1805. The English edition of the cookbook had been available in the colonies for decades. The Art of Cookery, written by Hannah Glasse, was published...
From: 18th-century American Women on 30 Jan 2020

January 2020: a Taste of “Before ‘Farm to Table'” Part III

Dear Recipes Project community, Happy 2020! This month we’ll mark the new year by highlighting some discoveries from the Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a Mellon initiative in collaborative...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Jan 2020

Cookbooks & Food in 18th-Century England Spread to the Colonies Reflecting Changes in Society

.Burgeoning cities in EnglandDuring the 18th century, English life started to breed the money-fuelled materialism that we are familiar with today. As landowners forced peasants off their land, freeing up the opportunity for commercial farming,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 28 Jan 2020

January 2020: a Taste of “Before ‘Farm to Table'” Part IV

Dear Recipes Project community, Happy 2020! This month we’ll mark the new year by highlighting some discoveries from the Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a Mellon initiative in collaborative research...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Jan 2020

Cooking with Others, Learning with our Bodies

by Fabio Parasecoli I am not a chef. I am just a moderately proficient homecook (you can check what I cook on my Instagram account @fparasecoli) I have not been to culinary school (although maybe… at some point…). I have never gone...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Jan 2020

Female Slaves & Rice Cultivation in Georgetown County, South Carolina

Female Slaves and Rice Cultivation in Georgetown County, South CarolinaThe intricate steps involved in planting, cultivating, harvesting, and preparing rice required an immense labor force. Planters stated that African slaves were particularly suited...
From: 18th-century American Women on 22 Jan 2020

Cooking Cakes in the 18th Century

.During the 18th-century, cooking special cakes to celebrate royal commemorations, weddings, anniversaries, religious holidays, revolutionary victories, and birthdays called for a Rich Cake which was sometimes called a Great Cake in early America. [1747]"To...
From: 18th-century American Women on 20 Jan 2020

January 2020: a Taste of “Before ‘Farm to Table'” Part II

Dear Recipes Project community, Happy 2020! This month we’ll mark the new year by highlighting some discoveries from the Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a Mellon initiative in collaborative...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Jan 2020

January 2020: a Taste of “Before ‘Farm to Table'” Part I

Dear Recipes Project community, Happy 2020! This month we’ll mark the new year by highlighting some discoveries from the Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a Mellon initiative in collaborative research...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jan 2020

Many colonial women served their food in pewter vessels & used pewter utensils

.In 18th-century America, most women served their meals on pewter plates, tankards, pitchers, flatware, and serving vessels.  Pewter is an alloy composed mainly of tin with various amounts of lead, copper, zinc, antimony, & bismuth. Women in...
From: 18th-century American Women on 17 Feb 2012

“we past Christmas day very agreeably”

HENRIETTA MARCHANT LISTON arrived in the United States in 1796 with her husband Robert who had been appointed British ambassador to the new nation. They took up residence in Philadelphia, the capital. Genuinely curious about the New World, they began...
From: In the Words of Women on 29 Dec 2019

Christmas Recipes in Early Modern Barcelona

Marta Manzanares Mileo In 1786, Rafael d’Amat i de Cortada, a member of Catalan nobility known as Baron of Maldà, described the Christmas holiday in his memoirs, noting that: “All sorts of torrons are sold in confectionery shops at...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Dec 2019

This Week on Dispatches: Don N. Hagist on Martha Bradley and Eighteenth-Century Cookery

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews historian and managing editor of the Journal of the American Revolution, Don N. Hagist, about the fascinating... The post This Week on Dispatches: Don N. Hagist on Martha Bradley and Eighteenth-Century...

Turkey Figs

I was researching the major tea importers and purveyors in Salem in light of the upcoming anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, but another commodity kept popping up in the sources: turkey figs. I didn’t look at any customs records, but...
From: streets of salem on 14 Dec 2019

Visualizing the Plate: Reading Modernist Mexican Cuisine Through Colonial Botany

Lesley A. Wolff The eighteenth century’s Age of Enlightenment signaled an era of standardization for the visual and textual colonial taxonomies of resources in the Americas. These illustrations were intended for export to European elites, many of...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Dec 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.