The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing food found 885 posts

Pächter Torte

By Simon Newman 15 dkg Zucker (15 decagrams sugar) Many of the recipes we use are filled with memories. I use pastry recipes that go back to my grandmother, probably even further. As I make them I remember her and my mother, I remember them making pies...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Feb 2021

Consuming History—Or Are We?

By Marie Pellissier  I’ve always been fascinated by the appeal of food in living history museums—the sound and aromas of someone cooking over an iron stove or open hearth never fails to draw visitors’ attention. Since I moved to...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Feb 2021

Turtles All the Way Down

This advertisement appeared in the 13 Oct 1761 New-York Gazette.Here are some tasty extracts from Washington biographer Alexis Coe’s conversation with Prof. Mary Draper about the background behind this ad: Mary: In the 18th century, colonists throughout...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Feb 2021

A Recipe for Music: Notating Domestic Singing in Seventeenth-Century England

By Sarah Koval Mary Chantrell and others, recipe book, f.92v, 1690, MS 1548. Image credit: Wellcome Library, London. Mary Chantrell’s book of recipes for food and medicines (1690) is typical of the manuscript recipe genre: a handwritten, bound book...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Feb 2021

The Circus Origins of Pink Lemonade

By Betsy Golden Kellem Few things whip up an appetite quite like the playground of cotton candy, popcorn, fried food and sweet drinks that accompanies a circus. Pink lemonade in particular has long been associated with the circus, which does not simply...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Feb 2021

A Request for Memories or Recipes Related to Beans and Rice

By Heather Ariyeh Background Do you have a favorite memory or recipe related to beans and rice? Throughout the world, people have combined beans and rice to form popular dishes. Together, they form a complete protein, but perhaps even more interestingly...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Feb 2021

Memories of Akara and Acaraje

By Ozoz Sokoh Kitchen Butterfly & Feast Afrique Taste Memories To this day, wherever I am, Nigeria or anywhere else in the world, I have a specific Saturday morning taste memory of bread, ogi and Akara lodged in my head, and heart I daresay. I spent...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Feb 2021

Golden State: Recipes and Memory

Amanda Elise Herbert and Annette Elise Herbert How do recipes make memories, and how do we remember the methods, ingredients, and techniques that go into making a dish, a piece of technology, a work of art, a scientific method? Memory is a powerful force,...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Feb 2021

A Missing Link for New College Puddings

By Helga Müllneritsch Almost nothing is known about the creators of the Begbrook Manuscript (AC 1420). It was purchased in the nineteenth century by the collector Daniel Parsons (1811-1887), and his collection was probably given to the Downside Abbey...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Jan 2021

Wayside Inn Foundation Events, 26 Jan. and 2 Feb.

The Wayside Inn Foundation, the nonprofit wing of Longfellow’s Wayside Inn in Sudbury, will host two online events in the next couple of weeks. Tuesday, 26 January, 7:00 P.M.“Sudbury’s Patriots of Color and the World of the American...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jan 2021

Food Identity Standards and Recipes as Legislation

By Clare Gordon Bettencourt  In 1933, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) organized an exhibit that came to be known as the Chamber of Horrors. The horrors on display were examples of packaging intended to deceive consumers. The...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jan 2021

“I believe they are a smuggling”

With less than two weeks left in 2020, there are still some significant events in 1770 that I missed discussing on their Sestercentennials, so I’m trying to catch up. The first of those events took place on 18 May and centered on Owen Richards,...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Dec 2020

Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?

This month, we asked our contributors: With many different holidays and celebrations approaching, what is your favorite beverage known to have been consumed during... The post Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?...

Feeding and Housing the Boston Massacre Jury

In addition to the costs of the defense in the first two Boston Massacre trials, we also have the second jury’s expense account.Normally a jury would produce minimal expenses. Even murder trials were supposed to be over in a day. After jurors retired...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Dec 2020

4. Meals on Wheels: The “Kitchen Cars” and American Recipes for the Postwar Japanese Diet

By Nathan Hopson From 1956 to 1960, the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) sponsored a fleet of food demonstration buses in Japan (“kitchen cars”) to improve national nutrition and fuel the nation’s economic recovery with more “modern”...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Dec 2020

Christmas Pye, Georgian Style, and other British Holiday Foods by Vic Sanborn

“I wish you a cheerful and at times even a Merry Christmas.” Jane Austen While Christmas festivities were not as commercial as they were during Queen Victoria’s and our time, families during Jane Austen’s era celebrated the holiday...
From: Jane Austen's World on 8 Dec 2020

The Dance Will Go On!

There is no contest for me: my favorite Salem event has always been the Christmas Dance at Hamilton Hall: I have never missed it in all the years I’ve lived in Salem, even in the one year I had to go alone. Last year I was in terrible pain from...
From: streets of salem on 28 Nov 2020

Abigail Adams’s Quiet Thanksgiving in 1798

On 29 Nov 1798, Abigail Adams sat down to an unusually small Thanksgiving dinner. An autumn Thanksgiving feast was an important tradition in New England, and in October Massachusetts’s governor, Increase Sumner, issued a proclamation naming the...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Nov 2020

Around the Table: Events

By Sarah Peters Kernan Last month, many Recipes Project contributors and readers participated in a virtual conference on Food and the Book: 1300-1800. This exciting event, spread out in sessions over two weeks, was co-sponsored by the Center for Renaissance...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Nov 2020

A root “that our French call rosary”: Foodways in Indigenous and French North America

Renée Girard In early modern France, foraging practices were associated with a ‘primitive’ style of food procurement, with times of dearth, and with poverty. God had given nature to his children for them to control, and agriculture...
From: Borealia on 9 Nov 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.