The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing food found 773 posts

Restorative Jelly and Strengthening Soup

By James Stark and Richard Bellis Victorians were obsessed with diet and appetite. Discussions about how to provide adequate nutrition to different human bodies spanned specialized scientific practice, domestic cookery, and manufacturers of...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Aug 2019

Exhibition Review: “Food: Bigger than the Plate”

By Catherine Price The Food: Bigger than the Plate exhibition is taking place at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London from May until October 2019. The exhibition takes you on a journey through the four zones of Composting; Farming; Trading; and Eating....
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Aug 2019

Dinner at the Sign of Liberty Tree

On 14 Aug 1769, 250 years ago today, Boston’s Sons of Liberty gathered to celebrate the anniversary of the first public protest against the Stamp Act, four years earlier.Of course, they were also celebrating what they saw as their triumph over Gov....
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Aug 2019

“The ladies of Massachusetts begin to give their cheese”

On 8 Aug 1801, the Impartial Observer of Providence, said to be a “short-lived Jeffersonian paper," ran this exclusive news item:For the IMPARTIAL OBSERVER.The Cheshire Ladies’ respect to President Jefferson.In the town of Cheshire, state...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Aug 2019

Looking into a Busy Tavern

In a discussion with Kurt Manwaring, Vaughan Scribner described his book Inn Civility: Urban Taverns and Early American Civil Society and offered this word picture of Henry Wetherburn’s tavern in Williamsburg, Virginia (shown above in its current...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Aug 2019

Milk Punch: A Drink that Keeps ‘Years by Sea or Land’

Milk punch is further clarified when it is run through a fine-weave cloth. We used a flour sack dish towel here, but several layers of cheesecloth would also be fine.  By Emily Beck and Nicole LaBouff From the summer of 2018 through the early spring...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Jul 2019

From Virginia Aristocracy to Boarding House to Cookbook Author - Mary Randolph (1762-1828)

Mary Randolph (1762-1828)Mary Randolph (1762-1828), early Southern cookbook author, was born in Virginia at either Tuckahoe, her father’s plantation in Goochland County, or Ampthill, that of her mother’s family in Chesterfield County. ...
From: 18th-century American Women on 19 Jan 2018

Stockfish and the Texture of Trust in the Early Modern Period

By Jack B. Bouchard “Stockvisch muss man bleüwen – One must beat stockfish” declared Balthasar Staindl in the first line of a lengthy entry on cooking cod in his 1544 Kochbuch.[1] Wielding a blunt instrument, the sixteenth century...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Jul 2019

A Cookbook Started in 1764

One of the items in the Harvard Library’s Colonial North American collection is the cookbook digitized here.Early in the book Sarah Fayerweather’s name appears over “June 26 MDCCLXIV,” telling us the initial owner and date.The...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jul 2019

Trail food bags & containers.

Trail Food Bags & Containers. "I have travelled with neere 200. of them at once, neere 100. miles through the woods, every man carrying a little Basket of this [Nokehick] at his back, and sometimes in a hollow Leather Girdle about his middle,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Jul 2019

The Pressure Cooker was Not an Instant Success

By Jennifer Egloff “What’s in your Pot tonight?” This question is often asked on Facebook pages dedicated to the Instant Pot and other electronic pressure cookers.  While many people know that the pressure cooker existed prior to...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Jul 2019

A New Tavern Opened in Brunswick Town

Archeologists from East Carolina University announced that they are exploring the site of an eighteenth-century tavern in Brunswick Town, North Carolina, once capital of that colony. The building was located by a student using ground-penetrating radar....
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jul 2019

The Natick Community and the Watertown Dam

Last month the Junto blog shared an interesting essay by Zachary M. Bennett, “Damming Fish and Indians: Starvation and Dispossession in Colonial Massachusetts.”Bennett writes:Compared to other Native Americans in southern New England, the...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jul 2019

Samuel Danforth’s Independence Day

In 1788 Samuel Danforth was a seventeen-year-old apprentice carpenter living in Providence, Rhode Island.The previous year he had started to keep a diary—fitfully at first and then more regularly. This was connected with his education since he recorded...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Jul 2019

Thomas Tryon’s Harmless Cocoe-Nut Water

By Andrea Crow Mouthfeel was only the beginning for the early modern vegetarian author Thomas Tryon. Tryon’s prolific literary output of tracts and guidebooks (complete with hundreds of recipes) advocating meat-free living treats texture as one...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Jul 2019

18th Century Herbal Use.

PLEASE NOTE: This list is supplied so that you can check these herbs against up to date/modern information. For instance, we grow comfrey in our garden, but up to date information warns against using this herb for food!Dictionary of 18th Century Herb...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 4 Jul 2019

Monkey Gland Cocktail

Lucy Jane Santos Think of cocktails and, more than likely, imagery of impossibly glamorous people, smoky rooms, and bootleggers will pop into your head. Or perhaps it’s something closer to unsavoury bars with lurid coloured abominations masquerading...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Jun 2019

Wild Foods. Nettle Pudding.

My sincere thanks to Grizz for sharing this recipe with me.Ancient Nettle PuddingRecipe courtesy of Ancient Craft and Celtnet RecipesAccording to Celtnet Recipes, “when most food was boiled in a large pot, adding dumplings or ‘puddings’...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 27 Jun 2019

Roundtable Conclusion: Food and Hunger in Vast Early America

Today at The Junto, Rachel Herrmann concludes our food roundtable with some questions for the field of early American food history
From: The Junto on 21 Jun 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.