The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "furniture"

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Your search for posts with tags containing furniture found 71 posts

Stiefel on Cabinetmaker John Head in Concord, 19 Sept.

On Thursday, 19 September, the Concord Museum will host a discussion with Jay Robert Stiefel about “The Cabinetmaker’s Account,” on the life and work of joiner John Head (1688-1754). Head emigrated from Britain to America, and his Philadelphia...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Sep 2019

Moving into a Harvard Dormitory in 1785

At this time of year young people are settling in at college, including my godson at Cambridge. So I’m looking at the process of entering college in 1785.Fifteen-year-old Charles Adams started at Harvard College that year. His parents, Abigail and...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Aug 2019

The Burnings of the Liberty

The Boston Gazette was the town’s staunchest Whig newspaper, quick to attack royal officials and to defend locals against charges of unrest. But printers Edes and Gill weren’t so protective about other communities.The Boston Gazette’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Aug 2019

A catalogue of the superb and elegant household furniture

“To be viewed three days (Sunday excepted) preceding the sale, when catalogues will be delivered …, which may be had on the premises, and of Messrs. Skinner and Dyke, Aldersgate Street.” Author: Skinner and Dyke. Title: A...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 1 Apr 2019

“The more I think of our Enemies quitting Boston…”

Here’s how Abigail Adams experienced the British evacuation of Boston on 17 Mar 1776. She was at the family home in Braintree, writing to her husband John in Philadelphia. (And she had a cold, but I’m skipping that.)I find the fireing was...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Mar 2019

Sufferers from the Great Boston Fire of 176

The scope of the Boston fire of 20 Mar 1760 really comes out in the list of victims that the newspapers published in the following week. The list was actually a guess, based on November 1759 property assessment records. The printers acknowledged that...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2019

A Firmer for Molding Your Square Butts

The Jackson family of the Brazen Head advertised a lot of hardware that was unfamiliar to me—not that I do much metalworking or woodworking. I looked up a bunch of those terms while confirming my transcription and got curious about others. So here’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jan 2019

A New Owner at the Brazen Head

By 1756, Mary Jackson had been running her shop at the Sign of the Brazen Head in central Boston for over twenty years.She had started as a suddenly widowed mother of two young children and for a few years had a male business partner, but then he died,...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jan 2019

Settling James Jackson’s Estate

The last installment of The Saga of the Brazen Head ended on 12 Sept 1735 with James Jackson drowning on a trip home from Maine. He left his wife Mary with two sons under the age of five. James left no will, so on 25 September a probate judge appointed...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jan 2019

August Anglo-Americana at Auction

August is high season for antique shows and auctions in New England: generally featuring Americana items with global goods mixed in, as our Yankee forebears, particularly those who dwelled in regional seaports like Salem and Portsmouth, were very worldly,...
From: streets of salem on 10 Aug 2018

A Discussion about Writing in Marlborough, 9 May

On Wednesday, 9 May, I’ll appear in the Friends of the Marlborough Public Library’s Author Series, discussing The Road to Concord, Colonial Comics: New England, this blog, and other writing. Here’s a P.D.F. file of the flyer for this...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 May 2018

John Chandler’s Human Property

The Worcester Art Museum recently added a label to its John Singleton Copley portrait of Lucretia Murray noting that her father had two slaves named Sylvia and Worcester when he died. According to the museum’s old webpage for this picture (which...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 May 2018

Behind the Victorian Mask, a Federal Dandy

Secretary Desk as foundNot every Victorian is as dowdy as they might seem. Last year, at the Warner House in Portsmouth NH, we began to plan the exhibit for the next 2-year cycle and a larger curatorial re-assessment of the interior. The main exhibit...
From: SilkDamask on 28 Apr 2018

A catalogue of all the stock in trade, working tools, household furniture…

Author: J. Agg & Son. Title: A catalogue of all the stock in trade, working tools, household furniture, and other effects of Mr. Michael Weston, brazier and tinman, High-Street, Evesham, which will be sold by auction, by J. Agg & Son …...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 10 Apr 2018

Hancock’s Trunk in Worcester, 16-22 Apr.

To celebrate Patriots’ Day, the Worcester History Museum is displaying John Hancock’s trunk for one week starting on Monday, 16 April. The museum will be open that day from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.This was reportedly the trunk where Hancock...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Apr 2018

Jobe on Thomas Chippendale, 29 Mar.

On Thursday, 29 March, the Nichols House Museum in Boston will sponsor a lecture on “Chippendale: The Man and the Myth” by Brock Jobe. The museum says:This year marks the 300th anniversary of Britain’s most celebrated furniture maker,...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Mar 2018

Valentine’s Notes for Martha Washington

In the Washington Papers is a document dated 25 Oct 1759, about a year and a half after George had met Martha and nine and a half months after they married. It’s headed “An Account of the Sail of the Estate of Colo. Custis Decst in WmsBurg.”...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Feb 2018

A Chair in New Old Clothing

At Kimberly Alexander’s Silk Damask blog, Jeffrey Hopper just wrote about the restoration of this chair to what was likely its original appearance. Hopper explained:Produced in Boston for the better part of 40 years, shipped throughout the colonies...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jan 2018

Digital Resources from Mount Vernon

Here are some digital goodies from the George Washington National Library at Mount Vernon, which I visited last year for a symposium.Podcasts: The Conversations from the Washington’s Library podcast usually features a one-on-one chat between the...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jan 2018

Digital Wallpaper at the Schuyler Mansion

Earlier this year Susan Holloway Scott of the Two Nerdy History Girls shared a look at the wallpaper of the Schuyler Mansion in Albany.Philip Schuyler was, of course, a wealthy man. He wanted the mansion he commissioned in 1761 to look good. And that...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Dec 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.