The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "fusil"

Showing 1 - 20 of 23

Your search for posts with tags containing fusil found 23 posts

New Additions To My Equipment.

17th-century Jamestown settlers unwind silk fiber from cocoonsdetail of a painting by NPS artist Sydney KingI know, usually I am looking to remove things from my knapsack, but I had a reason to add some things recently. A long time ago a close friend...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 13 Nov 2019

Guilty of Desertion? James White, 7th (Royal Fusiliers) Regiment

In today’s trial, see if you agree with the court’s verdict and sentence. In determining guilt, the court considered several factors: was the man... The post Guilty of Desertion? James White, 7th (Royal Fusiliers) Regiment appeared first on...

"Once Upon a Time": The Iconic Northwest Trade Gun

"Once Upon a Time": The Iconic Northwest Trade Gun: Used longer and more widely than any other firearm in American history and was the primary firearm of the fur trade from the late 17th...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 7 Nov 2016

The Cleaning Of A Muzzle-Loading Gun-Documentation.

 "The Care and Cleaning of Firelocks in the 18th Century: A Discussion of Period Methods and Their Present Day Applications." George Edie, A Treatise on English Shooting (London 1772) (7-8) "When a person is master of a good Piece, the keeping it...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 5 Jun 2016

An Update of small shot for Smoothbores.

My last findings during researching lead shot had me puzzled. In George Washington's list of goods he ordered "Drop Shot". This was prior to the invention of the shot tower. Further searching has turned up a couple of interesting facts. (1) Prince Rupert's...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 4 Apr 2016

18th-Century-Small-Arms-Manual PDF.

http://www.nps.gov/stri/upload/18th-Century-Small-Arms-Manual-Final-Draft.pdf
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 1 Feb 2016

Now fearch for Tow, and fome old Saddle pierce. No Wadding lies fo clofe, or drives fo fierce.

I have used leather wads for many years now, using my Father’s old 20 gauge wad punch. I started using leather wads not because of some historical documentation, but because it seemed the common sense and practicle thing to do. Leather will not...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 15 Sep 2015

The Correct 18th Century Term For The Steel On A Flint Lock.

The Flint Lock Hammer.The part of the flint lock that is struck by the flint which is held in the cock, is called a “hammer” or steel. The reason it has this name is because the earlier Snaphance lock had a steel that reminded people of a hammer....
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 15 Feb 2015

A Gap Between Powder & Ball. DON'T DO IT !!!

I made a statement on social media today, and immediately got challenged. I don't mind getting challenged, in fact I think it is a good thing. But when that challenge also includes some dangerous misinformation, it can be a problem for other people reading...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 8 Feb 2015

Loading & Shooting A Flintlock Fusil By Keith H. Burgess. Video.

This video has been produced from documentary footage.  My thanks to the Producer Mr Alex Cuff for allowing my own camera to be included and for giving me permission to use this footage. My thanks also to the Cameraman Kaelem E. Burgess for handling...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 26 Jun 2014

The Scottish Regiments, the Covenanters and the Killing Times

Dealing with insurgencies has long been part of a soldier’s life, but what has recently happened in Afghanistan, Iraq and Ireland is part of a far older story for the Scottish regiments of the British Army. In the 1680s, many Scottish soldiers were...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 4 Jul 2013

Gunpowder, Then and Now. Paper Cartridges.

After posting my video on how I make paper cartridges for my fusil, I got this message:"The British Military load for the brown bess was 125g of powder with an extra 40 grains for the pan for a total of 165g per cartridge. the powder from the original...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Mar 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.