The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "g w m reynolds"

Showing 41 - 60 of 77

Your search for posts with tags containing g w m reynolds found 77 posts

The Baroness: A Novel (Part III)

Read parts one and two of this fascinating tale by George W M Reynolds, originally written in 1837. Chapter Five: A Disclosure When Sans-géne awoke in the morning, he rubbed his eyes, and strove to collect his scattered ideas so as to call to mind...

Reynolds Studies: A Personal History by Rohan McWilliam

Professor Rohan McWilliam gives his own account of how he was introduced to the life and work of George W M Reynolds G. W. M. Reynolds Society I can honestly claim to have been interested in George W.M. Reynolds since early adolescence, even if my path...

George W.M. Reynolds’s Italian Chartist Republic

By Stephen Basdeo George William MacArthur Reynolds (1814–79) was one of, if not the, biggest-selling novelist of the Victorian era. Born in Kent, he was originally destined for a career in the navy, which was the path followed by his father. Upon...

The Lovers: A Legend of Guernsey

By George W.M. Reynolds For more information about Guernsey in the Victorian era, head on over to William Denicher’s fascinating site containing a number of short articles and contemporary images. On Sarnia’s shores the gales are soft,[1] ...

The Baroness: A Novel (Part II)

By George W.M. Reynolds Originally reprinted in The Monthly Magazine, then incorporated into Master Timothy’s Bookcase. Read Part I. Chapter Three: The Notary The breakfast was at length concluded. The priest retired to his study; the two young...

The Baroness: A Novel (Part I)

By George W.M. Reynolds Chapter One: The Calais Mail It was in the middle of August, 1822, that the epoch of our tale commences.[1] The clock of the General Post Office in Paris had struck the hour of five in the afternoon, and the passengers, who...

The History of the Bastille

By George W.M. Reynolds (Transcribed by Stephen Basdeo) The history of the Bastille is too intimately connected with that of the great French Revolution to be passed over without due notice and attention.[1] In proffering an account of that terrible...

The Wandering Jew’s Tale

By George W.M. Reynolds Originally published in the Monthly Magazine List awhile, and I will tell Crimes that caus’d a doom so fell     As that which curses me:[1] I Know, then, that as we led afar The Saviour unto Golgotha, ...

The Progress of Civilization in Belgium

By George W.M. Reynolds Much has been written on the history of the sciences, fine arts, literature, and commercial matters, in Belgium;[1] but, except in the academic memoir of Dean Heylen (De Inventis Belgarum, 1786) no one has as yet collected into...

Outside the Ballroom

(“Ainsi l’Hôtel de Ville illumine.”)[1] {VI., May, 1833.} By Victor Hugo Behold the ball-room flashing on the sight, From step to cornice one grand glare of light; The noise of mirth and revelry resounds, Like fairy melody on...

To a Newborn Child

Frail plant, condemn’d to crouch beneath the storm Of earthly ills, and shiver to the blast     That rules in this cold world     Th’ungenial atmosphere: May thy diminutive and fragile frame Survive the shocks of ev’ry latent...

19th-century French Poets and Novelists (Part II)

A Reprint of an Article by George W.M. Reynolds Part Two (Read Part One First) We now come to Alexandre Dumas.[1] Speaking of the ‘Souvenirs d’Antony,” the critic of the “Quarterly” says, “The scene of the first tale is Naples during...

19th-century French Poets and Novelists (Part I)

A Reprint of an Article by George W.M. Reynolds Part One. The “Quarterly Review” some time ago put forth a fulminating article against French novels.[1] In this article the origin of political revolution in France was attributed to the depraved...

The “Receipts” that Everyone Needs to See: A Glance at Susannah Frances Reynolds’s Cookbook

“Always keep the receipt”—that’s what my grandmother told me. It was usually uttered after she’d bought me something from a toy shop—probably because she was worried that whatever she purchased might be faulty and have to have it exchanged....

Marriage and Feasts

By Victor Hugo (“La salle est magnifique.”)[1] {IV. Aug. 23, 1839.} The hall is gay with limpid lustre bright— The feast to pampered palate gives delight— The sated guests pick at the spicy food, And drink profusely, for the...

The Sculptor of Florence

Our tale commences upon one of those delicious evenings, when the splendour of an Italian sun-set, and the beauties of an Italian sky, seem purposely adapted by Nature to imbue with tenderness and joy, the hearts of those fond lovers who seek the shady...

Hungarian Literature

[A reprint of a nineteenth-century essay on Hungarian literature]. The intellectual energies of the Hungarians were very tardy in developing themselves; at the same time the understanding of that people is acute and comprehensive, and their ideas are...

The Father: An Episode in the Life of a Nobleman

It was about twenty years ago, ere I succeeded to my present title, that I was returning one evening to my father’s house from that of a friend with whom I had been dining. Oh! the fatal evening! I remember it but too well—’twas in the winter time—thick...

Napoleon the Second: An Ode

Translated from the French of Victor Hugo by G.W.M. Reynolds in The Monthly Magazine (1837) I. A quarter of a century has gone, Since Gallia welcom’d her Napoleon’s son; The heav’n was low’ring on th’ expectant earth, Before th’...

The Fatal Glove

In one of the most retired streets of Nuremberg, towards the middle of the seventeenth century, resided the family of Madame Hamel.[1] She had been left a widow at an early age, with a moderate competency; and instead of mingling in the gay scenes of...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.