The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing gin found 976 posts

Expert Advice: SEO and Content Marketing

You’ve launched your website or started a blog. Congratulations! Now it’s time to attract an audience. You built a website to reach people with your art, ideas, or products and services. We’ve created a free online session to help you...
From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 21 May 2020

10 Ways to Make Your Site More Accessible

Today, Global Accessibility Awareness Day, raises awareness around digital access and inclusion and improving the web experience for everyone. This year, WebAIM analyzed one million homepages for accessibility issues and found that 98%...
From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 21 May 2020

Say Hello to the WordPress Block Editor

On June 1 we’ll be retiring our older WordPress.com editor and transitioning to the more recent (and more powerful) WordPress block editor. Want to know how this may affect your site and what you can expect? Read on. If you’ve launched...
From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 18 May 2020

The Quietus: A New Day Yesterday by Mike Barnes

It’s early 1974, British band Henry Cow is in the studio recording its second album, Unrest. One track features a 40-foot tape loop. Another is based on the Fibonacci sequence, a structural device borrowed from Karlheinz Stockhausen. The track is...
From: Mathew Lyons on 25 Apr 2020

Expert Advice: Get Started on Your New Website

Starting a new website can be a bit overwhelming but we’re here to help! Beginning Monday, April 20th, WordPress.com will host free, 30-minute live webinars to cover those initial questions that come up as you start to build your website. Each day...
From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 17 Apr 2020

The Fighting Parson’s Farewell Sermon

The history of the American Revolution is rife with heroic tales and amazing myths of patriotic American heroes that offer inspiring and entertaining stories.... The post The Fighting Parson’s Farewell Sermon appeared first on Journal of the American...

April 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “He now carries on the Peruke-Making Business in all its Branches.” Henry Davis, a wigmaker, hairdresser and barber, did not have only a single purpose for placing an...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Apr 2020

What They Saw and Did at Yorktown’s Redoubts 9 and 1

Receiving orders from Sir Henry Clinton, British commander in chief in North America, Lt. Gen. Charles Cornwallis led his troops to a position between... The post What They Saw and Did at Yorktown’s Redoubts 9 and 10 appeared first on Journal of...

April 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “ASSORTMENT of GOODS, Agreeable to the RESOLUTIONS.” The partnership of Smith and Atkinson informed consumers in and around Boston that they stocked “A small...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 Apr 2020

Prestapágina: Sharing PDFs During the Epidemic

Rebecca Quinn Teresi has created Prestapágina, a Facebook group for early modern Hispanists to share PDFs of book chapters and articles that we might find necessary now that academic libraries have shut down. She invites all to join – thanks...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 26 Mar 2020

March 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A CHINA MANUFACTURE.” In January 1770 an advertisement for “New China Ware” ran in the Pennsylvania Chronicle.  In it, the “CHINA PROPRIETORS...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Mar 2020

Thomas Rowlandson after Sir Joshua Reynolds, Count Ugolino… c. 1773

If one were to imagine the sort of painting likely to capture the imagination of the caricaturist Thomas Rowlandson then it’s unlikely that Sir Joshua Reynold’s Count Ugolino and his Children in the Dungeon would be the first image to spring...
From: The Print Shop Window on 4 Mar 2020

FOOD IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY TIDEWATER VIRGINIA

https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/bitstream/handle/10919/26153/LD5655.V856_1982.S772.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=yFOOD IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY TIDEWATER VIRGINIA: A METHOD FOR STUDYING HISTORICAL CUISINES by Maryellen Spencer Dissertation submitted to the...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Feb 2020

Gillian Pink at the Voltaire Foundation: thirteen years and counting

As we approach the completion of the Œuvres complètes de Voltaire, I sat down with team co-ordinator Gillian Pink to find out more about how joining the editorial team led to becoming a researcher in her own right. Gillian Pink and Birgit...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Feb 2020

Indigenous Possum Skin Cloaks.

Possum-skin cloak — Canberra Museum & Galleryhttps://aiatsis.gov.au/exhibitions/possum-skin-cloak
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 24 Feb 2020

The Benefits of Juniper Berries

Today pubs and bars are filled to the brim with wondrous varieties of Gin. The spirit has been resurgent in recent years becoming the fashionable drink of discerning customers. Its varied flavours created through the use of different botanical blends...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 19 Feb 2020

General Isaac Gregory’s Fictitious Treason

Col. Josiah Parker of Virginia was at a loss at what to do. He had just arrived outside the British outpost at Great Bridge... The post General Isaac Gregory’s Fictitious Treason appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

This Week on Dispatches: Michael Cecere on Virginia’s “Eighteen-Months Men” of 1780-81

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews teacher, author, and long-time JAR contributor Michael Cecere on Virginia’s “eighteen-months men,” militia who were drafted into the... The post This Week on Dispatches:...

February 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “WHOEVER sends Goods … may be assured of the Fidelity of the Master of said Hall.” In February 1770, John Gerrish “(And COMPANY.)” expanded his efforts...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Feb 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.