The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing government found 291 posts

A broad hint

Lyndhurst in Chancellor’s wig and gown, stands between Wellington (left, standing beside a writing table) and Brougham (right, also in a wig and gown), who face each other in profile. Lyndhurst looks at Wellington while gesturing with his left arm at...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 9 Aug 2021

Democratic principles, illustrated by example

Author: Cobbett, William, 1763-1835, author. Uniform Title: [Bone to gnaw, for the Democrats. Pt. 2. Selections] Title: Democratic principles, illustrated by example, part the first : part the second, containing an instructive essay, tracing all the...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Jun 2021

The Story of a Grave in Medford

In 1849 John Russell was digging a cellar and fence on land in Medford that belonged to Nathaniel Holmes Bishop. He turned up some human bones.Russell took those remains home and showed them to neighbors. It’s unclear what evidence led to this conclusion,...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 May 2021

“Representing the General and Committees as a set of idiots”

As I related yesterday, in April 1775 the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety ordered Abijah Brown of Waltham to prepare three cannon for use. Then, about three weeks later, the congress ordered him to deliver those three guns...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 May 2021

How Maj. Abijah Brown Went to War

Abijah Brown was born in Watertown in 1736, and on 24 May 1758, at the age of twenty-one, he married Sarah Stearns of Waltham.Their first child, Abijah, Jr., was born in Watertown the following March. By the next year they had moved to Waltham, where...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 May 2021

A short authentic account of the late decision, on the bull baiting question

Title: A short authentic account of the late decision, on the bull baiting question : in the case of the King against John Hill. With an appendix, containing the reports of the speeches of Mr. Windham, Mr. Canning, and Mr. Brougham, in resisting attemps...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 30 Apr 2021

The Fury of the Betrayed: What Attacks on Capitols in Montreal (1849) and Washington (2021) Tell Us About the Long History of Anti-Democratic Sentiment in North American Political Culture

Dan Horner On the night of April 25, 1849, a riled-up crowd of protesters showered Montreal’s parliament building with rocks, stormed through its front doors, and set the building—a repurposed public market in the city’s west-end—on...
From: Borealia on 13 Apr 2021

Capt. Dobel at Home and on the Far Side of the World

Except for several months as a Continental Navy lieutenant under Capt. John Manley, which ended badly, Joseph Dobel appears to have spent the Revolutionary War ashore in Boston. Certainly when he was in charge of confining suspected enemies of the state...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Apr 2021

The Aftermath of the Second Boston Tea Party

Yesterday I discussed the political effect of the second Boston Tea Party in London. Today I’ll wrap up this topic with a look at the ripples from the event in Massachusetts. Five local men were linked to the shipment of tea on the Fortune. All...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Mar 2021

“My sincere attachment to the interest of my country”

On the morning of 3 Mar 1774, Andrew Oliver, lieutenant governor of Massachusetts, died. He had previously held the offices of provincial secretary and stamp agent, though of course he never got to do any work in that last capacity.John Adams viewed Oliver...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Mar 2021

“Two peices of Cannon Brought From Watertown to ye Towns”

The 3 Feb 1775 petition to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety about eight iron cannon can’t answer the question of what happened to those guns. Did the congress assume control of them and add them to their other weapons?...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Feb 2021

Who Should Pay for Mr. Molineux’s Cannon?

I’m at last getting to the original purpose of the 3 Feb 1775 petition to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety that I’ve been discussing.All four men who signed the petition were delegates to the provincial congress...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Feb 2021

Who Would Pay for Mr. Molineux’s Eight Cannon?

I’m at last getting to the original purpose of the 3 Feb 1775 petition to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety that I’ve been discussing.All four men who signed the petition were delegates to the provincial congress...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Feb 2021

Four Representative Men

I’ve been analyzing a letter about cannon sent to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety in February 1775.This posting looks at the four men who signed that letter, in order of their signatures. James Barrett (1710-1779)...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Feb 2021

Mounting Expenses for Four Towns

This posting continues the analysis of a 3 Feb 1775 letter that I started quoting yesterday, from men in four different towns to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s committee of safety.Yesterday’s extract shows the letter was about eight...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Feb 2021

Searching for Mr. Molineux’s Cannon

Last month I wrote about William Molineux obtaining eight cannon for the Massachusetts resistance in the last weeks before he died on 22 Oct 1774.When I did, Joel Bohy of Bruneau & Co. and Antiques Roadshow, a truly dedicated local and living historian,...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Feb 2021

A Short Narrative “from the London Edition”?

On 16 July 1770, six days after the Boston town meeting reaffirmed its ban on selling copies of its Short Narrative of the Horrid Massacre locally, this advertisement appeared in the Boston Evening-Post:Next WEDNESDAY will be Published,[from the London...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2021

“The printed Narratives of the late horred Massacre”

This week I watched an online talk by Robert Darnton about his new book Pirating and Publishing: The Book Trade in the Age of Enlightenment. He described various stratagems printers and booksellers used to get around two stifling forces in ancien régime...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Feb 2021

The Problem of Legacy: John A. Macdonald and the Politics of History

Andrew Nurse The Macdonald-Laurier Institute (MLI) and the Friends of Canadian History have issued a statement in “In Defence of Sir John A. Macdonald and his Legacy.” The statement–which is actually not just a statement but a petition—is...
From: Borealia on 1 Feb 2021

How Natty Martyn Grew Up

Last September, we got a passing glimpse of fifteen-year-old Natty Martyn, youngest son of the minister in Northborough in 1756. Natty had a bad sore, and his family had begun to despair for him. The Rev. John Martyn took his son to Dr. Ebenezer Dexter...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jan 2021

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By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.