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Your search for posts with tags containing gunpowder found 160 posts

Book Review: ‘Legacy’ by John Pilkington

The Gunpowder Plot is one of those major subjects of the early Stuart era (the Jacobean period) that people tend to know about, but, in my experience, very few historical fiction works focus on the period just after that. In John Pilkington’s novel...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 1 Aug 2021

The Guns that Didn’t Bark

One of my big unanswered questions about the Battle of Lexington and Concord on 19 Apr 1775 is why the provincial forces didn’t deploy any of the cannon they had just spent months collecting and preparing for a fight. The guns that James Barrett...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Feb 2021

“Quite in the Land of Amaze”

Yesterday we left Israel Putnam at noon on Saturday, 3 Sept 1774, sending letters to many other Connecticut militia officers, passing on dire news he had heard about Boston.Putnam himself set off toward Boston on horseback with his local militia regiment,...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Feb 2021

Israel Putnam and ”an express from Boston”

On 1 Sept 1774, British soldiers acting on orders of Gen. Thomas Gage took control of province-owned gunpowder stored in Charlestown (now Somerville) and two cannon used by a Cambridge militia company.As governor and thus captain-general of the Massachusetts...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jan 2021

Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg, May 1775

It had been a very hectic week in Williamsburg for Peyton Randolph, the Speaker of Virginia’s House of Burgesses and the President of the... The post Patrick Henry’s March on Williamsburg, May 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American...

How Malden Managed “Our Cannon”

On 21 Apr 1775, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s Committee of Safety officially set up its artillery regiment by sending for Richard Gridley, Scarborough Gridley, and David Mason, three of the top four officers in that unit.At the same time...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jun 2020

Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775

No one disputes that the fighting that erupted at Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 ignited a war between Great Britain and her... The post Williamsburg Becomes and Armed Camp, 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Hsiung on “The Metabolism of Military Forces,” 10 Mar.

On Tuesday, 10 March, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host a joint session of its Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar and Boston Seminar on Environmental History series.Prof. David Hsiung of Juniata College will present a paper on “The...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Mar 2020

“Agree for the Powder to be brought Down to the Mole”

The start of the Revolutionary War changed New London merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr.’s business environment.For one thing, military supplies were much more valuable. On 25 Apr 1775 Shaw asked his connection in New York for “Five Hundred wt....
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2020

Trading for Gunpowder Just Before the War

Last year I wrote about the New London, Connecticut, merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr., and his many ways of evading Customs duties on molasses and other goods.Shaw’s experience moving molasses from the Caribbean to mainland North America was useful...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Feb 2020

Priming Horn Documentation Found!

Priming Horn Information.“The priming-horn is intended to be filled with Pistol Powder, and the Ranger always to prime from it in time of action, by which method he will not be near so subject to burn priming or miss fire as He would by...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 31 Jan 2020

Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation: Information and Slavery

Lord Dunmore, John Murray, the 4th Earl of Dunmore (1730-1809) and Royal Governor of Virginia (1771-1776),[1] was an important political and military figure during... The post Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation: Information and Slavery appeared first on...

The Career of Captain Dundas

Once I saw that “Captain Dundas” had come up in the dispute between James Otis, Jr., and John Robinson, I had to figure out who that was and what role he played in the coming of the Revolution.In September 1769, Otis called Dundas “a...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Dec 2019

Spence's Old Powder Horn.

No date on Spences horn, but obviously it looks pretty old, & Spence's images were so good I just had to ask Spence if I could use his images. Thanks Mate, very much appreciated.Spence being Spence he just had to put this old horn back into service,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 9 Nov 2019

Attack on Jonathan Sewall’s House

On 1 Sept 1774, Gen. Thomas Gage sent soldiers out to Charlestown to remove the provincial militia’s supply of gunpowder from the stone tower that still stands in what is now Somerville.Some of Gage’s troops went on into Cambridge and wheeled...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Sep 2019

The Burnings of the Liberty

The Boston Gazette was the town’s staunchest Whig newspaper, quick to attack royal officials and to defend locals against charges of unrest. But printers Edes and Gill weren’t so protective about other communities.The Boston Gazette’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Aug 2019

Refighting Bunker Hill with the Angry Staff Officer

This is the anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill. For an overview of the action this year, I’m pointing to the Angry Staff Officer’s article “Warfighter: Bunker Hill.”It sets aside the mysteries, ambiguities, and evidence that...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jun 2019

Gunpowder, the Bahamas, and the First Marine Killed in Action

In the summer of 1775, George Washington assumed command of the Continental Army outside Boston and immediately began the process of organizing his forces.... The post Gunpowder, the Bahamas, and the First Marine Killed in Action appeared first on Journal...

“The fire was fast approaching the building”

Returning to The Saga of the Brazen Head, I’ll share some Bostonians’ experiences of the Great Fire of 20 Mar 1760, which began after dark in that brazier’s shop.At that time David Mason was a decorative painter four days short of his...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2019

“Then was beheld a perfect torrent of fire”

The 24 Mar 1760 Boston Evening-Post, the first issue after the great fire that started in the Brazen Head, reprinted the Boston News-Letter’s account of how the flames spread. The Fleet brothers then tried to communicate the emotional experience...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2019

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