The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "health"

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Your search for posts with tags containing health found 238 posts

Dr Joshua Ward, the ‘Friar’s Balsam’ man

I recently came across an advert in the Newcastle Courant, 24 November 1744 for a product I recalled from childhood, ‘Friar’s Balsam’. I have a vague recollection of adding it to hot water to inhale to ease the symptoms of a cold. No...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Feb 2021

Learning to Walk

The baby walker is a device to support an infant who is not yet independently mobile to ‘walk’ around. In the past they were thought to aid the child’s development as she learned to walk. Images of the baby walker date back at least...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 12 Jan 2021

New Tool for Treating Mental Illness, ca. 1817

The NY Times recently reported on “A New Tool in Treating Mental Illness: Building Design.”1 Looking at a couple of mental health facilities in California, one recently completed and one still under construction, the article highlights some...
From: Darin Hayton on 8 Jan 2021

Lead-A 19th-C. Public Health Issue

The June 1879 issue of The Phrenological Journal and Life Illustrated contains the following brief notice: Already in the 19th century we had a sense that lead was a health hazard, particularly in water pipes. Given our on-going problems with lead in...
From: Darin Hayton on 3 Jan 2021

Black Mothers Matter: Social Media can Shift the Agenda for Black Maternal Health

On 25th May 2020 the murder of George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black American man, by police officer Derek Chauvin, sent social media into an uproar that reignited the Black Lives Matter Movement. The use of the global hashtag ‘#BLM’ was everywhere:...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 26 Oct 2020

It cost me a cold

Travelling and bathing In June 1645 John Evelyn travelled from Rome to Venice. The journey left him extremely weary and so he decided to visit the ‘Bagnias’ to take a bath. He described the experience as follows: [The bath] treat after the...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 7 Oct 2020

The (Failed) French Revolution against Medical Expertise and Foucault’s Philosophy of History

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitle “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Blake Smith Capitalist democracy has a problem with public health. The premises of political and economic liberalism, which organize society...
From: Age of Revolutions on 8 Jun 2020

Revisiting Carla Nappi’s “Translating Recipes 1: Narrating Qing Bodies”

Editor’s Note: Today we revisit a classic post from our archives on Late Imperial China by Carla Nappi, which sits the intersection of medicine and storytelling. “Narrating Qing Bodies” kicked off an extended series of translations and...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Apr 2020

Quarantines in Salem

I’m pretty familiar with the origins of the quarantine, having taught classes on or in the era of the Black Death for twenty years: quaranta (40) days that ships were required to anchor in the harbor off Venice before they could unload their...
From: streets of salem on 31 Mar 2020

Sisters in Service: Salem 1918

When your focus is on historical women, as mine has been for these 2020 #salemsuffragesaturday posts, sometimes you find their stories are somewhat segregated from what is going on at a particular time, and sometimes it is clear that their stories are...
From: streets of salem on 28 Mar 2020

The Benefits of Juniper Berries

Today pubs and bars are filled to the brim with wondrous varieties of Gin. The spirit has been resurgent in recent years becoming the fashionable drink of discerning customers. Its varied flavours created through the use of different botanical blends...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 19 Feb 2020

Fox Flesh

The self-styled ‘Professor of Physick’ and prolific publisher of medical texts William Salmon (1644-1713) was described by some as the ‘King of the Quacks’.1 While I’m sure he did not see himself in that light he was an empiric,...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 29 Jan 2020

Menopause before Menopause

Today (18th October) is World Menopause Day, So we thought we’d have a look at women’s experiences in the past. Menopause was not a word that had any currency in the period covered by this blog. In fact, the word was not seen in print until...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 18 Oct 2019

Female dentists of the 18th century

As you may be aware we have previously written about 18th century dentistry and I was interested when I came across ‘City Women in the 18th Century’ which showed a trade card for a female dentist, Catherine Madden. British Museum Catherine...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 Sep 2019

Eighteenth-century bathing machines

During the eighteenth and into the nineteenth-century it became fashionable and beneficial to enjoy the pleasures of swimming in the sea so, in order to preserve modesty, bathing machines were invented. These allowed the swimmer to enter the contraption...
From: All Things Georgian on 9 Apr 2019

How bed bugs were dealt with in the Georgian era

Admit it – many of you are scratching already, aren’t you? I was whilst writing this if I’m honest. One of our readers asked about turpentine being used to kill head lice and this set us off to find out more about the subject and somehow...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Apr 2019

“Our Habitation Becomes a Paradise”: Dreaming about Health in the Anthropocene

Before the species-ending plague, the characters in Mary Shelley’s novel The Last Man (1826) dream of a world without disease.  Early in the first volume, Adrian—only son of England’s final reigning monarch—argues that, here...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 12 Mar 2019

Resuscitation in the Eighteenth-Century

The Royal Humane Society was founded in London in 1774 by two eminent medical men, Dr William Hawes (shown in the header picture at the bedside) and Dr Thomas Cogan, who were keen to promote techniques of resuscitation. We think of resuscitation as something...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Mar 2019

Disability in the Eighteenth-century

We came across an engraving posted on social media by Dr Hannah Greig recently and for those of you who know of our propensity for disliking unsolved mysteries we were immediately intrigued and wanted to see if there was any more information about the...
From: All Things Georgian on 31 Jan 2019

Eating Right in 1950s Educational Films

By Jonathan MacDonald There is a right way and a wrong way to do everything, or so argued the creators of Coronet Instructional Films. In their mission to educate American youth in the post-World War II decade, the Coronet film catalog made sure that...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Jan 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.