The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "health"

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Your search for posts with tags containing health found 254 posts

Medicinal Marsh Mallows

I must confess the title is perhaps a little bit ‘click bait’ in style. This post is sadly not about the soft pink and white sugary treats we are all familiar with, but about the plant marsh mallow, and its supposed medicinal qualities; although...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 28 Jun 2017

Robert Dingley, founder of The Magdalen Hospital

Having already written about The Magdalen Hospital we thought it would make an interesting article to provide a little more information about one of its founders – Robert Dingley. Robert was later referred to by Mary Ann Radcliffe...
From: All Things Georgian on 22 Jun 2017

Finding your Feet

I am currently reading the diary of Richard Kay a doctor in Lancashire born in 1716 and practicing medicine, with this father, in the 1740s (you can find out more about Richard and his family here). Kay’s diary is interesting for a number of reasons...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 14 Jun 2017

Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine On Offer

Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine in Early Modern England is now available for £35. To make a purchase on the Boydell and Brewer website just enter offer code BB401 at the checkout. A discount flyer and order form can also be found here...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 8 Jun 2017

Maladies & Medicine

Maladies and Medicine offers a lively exploration of health and medical cures in early modern England. The introduction sets out the background in which the body was understood, covering the theory of the four humours and the ways that male and female...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 31 May 2017

Painful Operations: Removing Bladder Stones before Anesthesia

If you visit the Gordon Museum at Guy’s Hospital in London, you’ll see a small bladder stone—no bigger than 3 centimetres across. Besides the fact that it has been sliced open to reveal concentric circles within, it is entirely unremarkable...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 29 May 2017

Toy shop Treatments

I have always been intrigued reading 17th and 18th century newspaper advertisements for medical remedies by the locations in which these products were sold and from whom they could be purchased. Looking at the drugs advertised in almanacs Louise Hill...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 24 May 2017

Reading the Legal Record like a Physician

Posted by Sara M. Butler; 19 May 2017. Social historians have long recognized the value of the legal record to gain entrance into the lives of the average medieval Joe and Joanna. For most medieval men and women, records of their court appearances –...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 19 May 2017

A Famous Fistula

The Spanish Ambassador to James I of England suffered from an anal fistula which was common knowledge. John Reynolds’ imagined conversation between the late King Henry, Queen Anne, and Queens Mary and Elizabeth in 1624 includes the comment that...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 3 May 2017

Guest Post : Elizabeth Gibson, née Smith (1646-1692), ‘My Dear Wife’

Today, we are honoured to have Sara visit our blog, so bear with us while we travel slightly further back in time with her whilst she tells us the story of one early modern woman. Sara’s book Maids, Wives, Widows: Exploring Early Modern Women’s...
From: All Things Georgian on 20 Apr 2017

Maladies and Medicines

We are very pleased to announce that our new book – coming July 2017 – is now available to pre-order from a range of retail outlets! Maladies and Medicine: Exploring Health and Healing 1540-1740 (Pen and Sword Press) Maladies and Medicine...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 19 Apr 2017

Thomas Gibson’s Life and Times

The name of Dr Thomas Gibson (1648/9–1722) isn’t one with much impact outside those studying the history of medicine, yet his story is one full of interesting details. Gibson was born in High Knipe, in the parish of Bampton, Westmorland.1...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 6 Apr 2017

Medicine, Environment and Health in the Eastern Mediterranean World 1400-175

Christ’s College, University of Cambridge Monday 3 and Tuesday 4 April 2017Organized by Valentina Pugliano (Cambridge) and Nükhet Varlik (Rutgers-Newark)Generously sponsored by the Wellcome Trust and Christ's College, CambridgeThis conference...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 3 Apr 2017

Pregnancy in Prison – Past and Present

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 13 Mar 2017

‘Taking the waters’ at Buxton in 18

The majority of us will have come across Buxton Water which today is sold commercially bottled, but what was known about Buxton and its health-giving water in 1800? The Georgians had an obsession with their health, and there were several popular spa...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Mar 2017

Pancake Plasters

Yesterday, as I am sure everyone is well aware, was Shrove Tuesday. A day when Facebook and Twitter feeds abound with people posting picture of their perfect pancakes. Several historical twitter feeds shared images of early modern pancake recipes, so...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 1 Mar 2017

Pre-Order My Book! The Butchering Art

I’m thrilled to reveal the cover for the US edition of my forthcoming book, THE BUTCHERING ART, which will be published by FSG on October 17th. The book delves into the grisly world of Victorian surgery and transports the reader to a period...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 16 Feb 2017

Poking fun at Physicians

For another project I have been reading lots of early modern joke books and I thought I’d share some of what I’d found here. Books of amusing songs, poems, funny stories and jokes, known as jest-books sold a lot in the seventeenth century....
From: Early Modern Medicine on 15 Feb 2017

Spare Ribs

During my PhD I had trouble with my arms. After speaking to a fantastically enthusiastic surgeon it was revealed that I have cervical ribs. An extra set of ribs growing out of my cervical spine (you can see my x-ray
From: Early Modern Medicine on 1 Feb 2017

Calling for Back Up

Daniel Turner was born in London, probably, on 18 September 1667. When he grew up he served a two-year apprenticeship under London surgeon Charles Bateman, and a five-year apprenticeship with Thomas Lichfield. In 1691 he joined the Company of Barber...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 25 Jan 2017

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.