The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "hercules"

Your search for posts with tags containing hercules found 17 posts

Hercules Revisited

Back in January of 2016 I posted two pieces about a slave named Hercules who was George Washington’s cook for many years both in Mount Vernon and Philadelphia. See them here and here. There was an additional post about Hercules in 2017. Hercules...
From: In the Words of Women on 30 Apr 2019

Hercules Posey, Cook in New York

Craig LaBan’s article for the Philadelphia newspapers about the mysteries surrounding George Washington’s escaped cook Hercules didn’t stop at debunking the claim that he was the black man wearing a tall white hat in a widely reprinted...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2019

New Findings about an Old Portrait

Earlier this month Craig LaBan reported for the Philadelphia newspapers on the portrait shown here. In recent decades this been widely identified as showing Hercules, a cook enslaved by President George Washington. Hercules achieved high status in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Mar 2019

Interview with Ramin Ganeshram, author of The General’s Cook: A Novel

JAR: In a nutshell, can you give us a basic overview of The General’s Cook? RG: The General’s Cook is about George Washington’s enslaved chef, Hercules,... The post Interview with Ramin Ganeshram, author of The General’s...

September 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-York Journal (September 15, 1768).“Broadcloth from the New-York MANUFACTORY.” At the same time that Enoch Brown was placing advertisements addressed to “those...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Sep 2018

“Dismantling History” —Titus Kaphar

My friend and colleague Louise North recently commended to my attention an American artist named TITUS KAPHAR. Indeed, upon examination, I find his work fascinating as it frequently deals with history—myth and misremembered—often focusing...
From: In the Words of Women on 5 May 2017

Bake a cherry pie

Since recent posts have be concerned with the slave Hercules, George Washington’s highly regarded chef who escaped, I thought I would bring to your attention a book describing how the Washingtons’ dinner table might have looked and what the...
From: In the Words of Women on 28 Jan 2016

Follow-up on Hercules

Apropos the recent controversy over the depiction of Hercules, the cook in the household of George and Martha Washington, in A Birthday Cake for George Washington (see previous post), here are some additional interesting details about Hercules. The Philadelphia...
From: In the Words of Women on 25 Jan 2016

Hercules and the Birthday Cake for Washington

In the news recently is the recall by Scholastic Publishers of A Birthday Cake for George Washington by author Ramin Ganeshram and illustrator Vanessa Brantley-Newton which was released on January 5. The story is about Washington’s cook, a slave...
From: In the Words of Women on 21 Jan 2016

No Birthday Cake for George Washington

This month Scholastic published a book about Hercules, the Washingtons’ cook at Mount Vernon and Philadelphia in the 1790s. And this week Scholastic decided to pull that book from circulation. As The Guardian reported: A Birthday Cake for George...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2016

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 8

Nymph of the garden where all beauties be; Beauties which do in excellency pass His who till death looked in a watery glass, Or hers, whom naked the Trojan boy did see; Sweet garden nymph, which keeps the cherry tree, Whose fruit doth...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 21 Aug 2015

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 51

Pardon mine ears, both I and they do pray, So may your tongue still fluently proceed, To them that do such entertainment need, So may you still have somewhat new to say. On silly me do not the burden lay, Of all the grave conceits your brain doth breed; But...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 13 Jun 2014

The Jamaican Diaspora

    British settlers landing at the Cape Colony   There was of course a huge Jamaican diaspora in the second half of the twentieth century. After the second World War the Windrush generation left the Caribbean in large numbers to work...
From: A Parcel of Ribbons on 28 Sep 2013

Celts in the American Revolution

Portrait of Patrick Henry by George Bagby Matthews (c. 1891), after Thomas Sully. Source: U.S. Senate“Give me liberty or give me death!” shouted Patrick Henry of Virginia to the members of the Continental Congress in 1775. His words became...

The King’s Stairs

The King’s Stairs in William III’s State Apartments in the newer half of Hampton Court Palace is a stunning example of Baroque architecture and artwork. The walls were painted (circa 1700) by Italian Baroque painter Antonio Verrio and conjure...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 12 Feb 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.