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Your search for posts with tags containing historical fiction found 419 posts

The Mirror and the Light explained: Why wasn’t Cromwell put on trial?

If you have read all of The Mirror and The Light, you will have noticed that, unlike Anne and George Boleyn (who were put on trial in Bringing up the Bodies), Thomas Cromwell was never tried in court. Instead, an Act of Attainder was passed after which...
From: Kirsten Claiden-Yardley on 23 Jan 2022

The Mirror and the Light explained: was Jenneke Cromwell a real person?

In the Hilary Mantel’s final book in the Wolf Hall trilogy, Cromwell is surprised by the visit of a young woman from Antwerp. Her name is Jenneke and it emerges that she is his illegitimate daughter by Anselma, his lover whilst he lived in Antwerp....
From: Kirsten Claiden-Yardley on 12 Nov 2021

Book Review: ‘The Guardian’ by Maeve Greyson

Sometimes we need a bit of escapism and, for me, that sometimes means a romance—and this book totally fit the bill. I have to be honest, I wasn’t really interested in the beginning, but that might just be down to me not being in the right frame of...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 29 Aug 2021

Book Review: ‘Legacy’ by John Pilkington

The Gunpowder Plot is one of those major subjects of the early Stuart era (the Jacobean period) that people tend to know about, but, in my experience, very few historical fiction works focus on the period just after that. In John Pilkington’s novel...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 1 Aug 2021

“A poor drum-boy, killed by the goat on St David’s Day”

In 1832 the United Service Journal, and Naval and Military Magazine ran an unsigned article titled “Record of the Services of the Twenty-Third Regiment, or Royal Welsh Fusileers." In describing that regiment’s losses at the Battle of Bunker Hill,...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jun 2021

“Hardly men left enough to saddle their goat!”

Francis Grose (1731-1791, shown here) had a short career in the British army, filling the lowest officer’s rank of cornet during the 1740s. He later became a militia captain and adjutant. But his heart was in historical research. Grose, a hard-working...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jun 2021

Book Review: The Firefly Witch by Amanda Hughes

I’ve had The Firefly Witch on my bookshelf since it was published a few years ago and I finally had a chance to read it – and I’m glad I did. Set in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1662, we meet Circe: a red-haired girl with an amazing...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 12 May 2021

Book Review: ‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton

‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton follows the story of Barbara Villiers from her adolescence, her passionate relationship with her first love, Philip Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield, through her marriage to Roger Palmer, her notorious...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 25 Feb 2021

Ten Favorite Reads of

Despite the trauma of the pandemic (or maybe because of it), 2020 turned out to be an amazing year of reading for me. I managed to finish 44 books by the end of December, a personal record since I began keeping track in 2012 (you can see my yearly lists...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 4 Jan 2021

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #1

Over the past few weeks, we've examined ESCAPE, RELEVANCE, DRAMA, EMOTION, GLITZ, HISTORY, FRANCE, CHATEAUX and LITERARY LINEAGE as reasons to read historical fiction set in sixteenth century France. All of these contribute, in their own way, to our culminating...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 11 Nov 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #9

Two reasons left! As a literature professor as well as a writer, I hold this one close to my heart.Reason #9--LITERARY LINEAGECurrent historical fiction set in sixteenth century France participates in a rich tradition stretching back to the seventeenth...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 23 Oct 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #8

The next reason I'll propose for reading historical fiction set in sixteenth century France is a corollary of Reason #7--FRANCE, but one that merits its own mention...Reason #8--CHATEAUXFrance's scenic countryside is dotted with thousands of castles....
From: Writing the Renaissance on 20 Oct 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #7

Today's reason almost goes without saying...Reason #7--FRANCEFrance is the most popular travel destination in the world, visited by 89 million foreign tourists in 2018 alone. The country's vineyards beaches mountainsand vibrant cities tug...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 17 Oct 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #6

ESCAPE, RELEVANCE, DRAMA, EMOTION, GLITZ are the factors we've examined so far. Now it's time for one that, though obvious, nevertheless deserves attention...Reason #6--HISTORYIn today's educational landscape, the study of history hardly occupies a prominent...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 12 Oct 2020

Anna Belfrage’s ‘Glory and Gore’ Blog Event

Acclaimed historical fiction author Anna Belfrage kindly invited me on a blog event entitled, ‘Glory and Gore: The Dichotomy of the Glorious 17th Century’, and I’m honoured to have been the first guest in her line-up! Other authors of...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 5 Oct 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #4

ESCAPE, RELEVANCE, and DRAMA--these are the reasons I've examined so far to promote historical fiction set in what scholars call the "Early Modern" era. Today, we'll talk about...Reason #4: EMOTIONAlthough manners and mores have changed over the centuries,...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 2 Oct 2020

Guest Post by Karen Odden: The “Mysnomer” in the Label “Historical Mystery”

I asked Karen Odden, author of the Victorian mysteries A DANGEROUS DUET (2018) and A TRACE OF DECEIT (2019) about the differences between historical mystery and straight historical fiction. Here's what she had to say!The “Mysnomer” in the...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 30 Sep 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #3

Still looking for reasons to read or write historical fiction set in Renaissance France? Here's one sure to convince you.Reason #3: DRAMAThere's something about Renaissance dynasty dramas that strongly appeals to modern television audiences. From 2007-2010,...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 28 Sep 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? Reason #

Yesterday, I set out to convince you why reading and writing historical fiction set in Renaissance France was a worthwhile endeavor. The first reason I offered was ESCAPE from the turbulence of our present situation. Today, I offer a second reason: RELEVANCE.Reason...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 25 Sep 2020

Why Read Historical Fiction Set in Sixteenth Century France? 10 Reasons

In these turbulent times, as society reels from pandemic, natural disasters, and political turmoil, one might reasonably ask: "Why read historical fiction? And why, in particular, historical fiction set in sixteenth century France?" The companion question--why...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 23 Sep 2020

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