The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "historiography"

Showing 1 - 20 of 619

Your search for posts with tags containing historiography found 619 posts

More Ways to Celebrate Patriots Day 2021 Safely

As I’ve both marveled at and lamented before, it’s hard to find a truly comprehensive list of commemorations of the 19th of April because so many historical sites, towns, and organizations have their own. Some of those organizations group...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Apr 2021

Commemorating Patriots Day 2021 Safely

Here in Massachusetts we’re still in a race to vaccinate people against the Covid-19 virus even as cases are rising again. The end of the pandemic is in sight, but we need to minimize casualties.Wisely, the local organizations that lead the commemoration...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Apr 2021

History Camp America 2021 and Other Conferences to Enjoy

I’ve been presenting at and enjoying History Camp Boston since 2014 (as shown here). Last year the pandemic stopped this conference from happening. This year, the prospect of traveling and gathering is still uncertain, though the situation is looking...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Apr 2021

Locating “Revolution Happened Here”

Here’s a digital public history project to keep an eye on the coming years: Revolution Happened Here: Our Towns in the American Revolution, from the Pioneer Valley History Network.This website invites local history organizations from western Massachusetts...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Apr 2021

Not a Podcast Recommendation

I recently stumbled across the podcast “The American War: Britain’s American Revolution,” which is not actually a podcast. It’s the recordings of five sessions of a conference at the Huntington Library years ago. But those are...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Apr 2021

La Nouvelle-France, une société du « long Moyen Âge » ? Partie

Arnaud Montreuil Peut-il être intéressant pour les historiens de la Nouvelle-France et du Early Canada de comparer la société néofrançaise à la société médiévale ? Dans le billet...
From: Borealia on 29 Mar 2021

Was New France a society of the “long Middle Ages”? Part

Arnaud Montreuil  Could it be interesting for historians of New France and early Canada to compare New French society to medieval society? In the first part of this post, I suggested that this might be the case, and that this avenue deserves to be...
From: Borealia on 29 Mar 2021

Evacuation Day Lecture Now Online

I’ve put “The End of Tory Row,” my Evacuation Day talk for Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters, online at YouTube. Because this was an online talk, I loaded my PowerPoint up with more graphics. I hope those survive...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Mar 2021

Was New France a society of the “long Middle Ages”?

Arnaud Montreuil With the arrival of the first explorers, then as settlers began to claim land, medieval West burgeoned in the Americas.[1] This is the idea put forward by historian Jérôme Baschet in a series of works, including his book...
From: Borealia on 15 Mar 2021

La Nouvelle-France, une société du « long Moyen Âge » ?

Arnaud Montreuil Avec l’arrivée des premiers explorateurs, puis à mesure que se consolide la colonisation, c’est l’Occident médiéval qui prend place en Amérique[1]. Telle est l’idée défendue...
From: Borealia on 15 Mar 2021

“Storm of Witchcraft” with Emerson W. Baker, 11 Mar.

Tonight, 11 March, the History Camp online discussion series welcomes Emerson W. Baker speaking about the Salem Witch Trials.Tad Baker wrote Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience, which investigates the key players in the Salem...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Mar 2021

Three New Interviews

A couple of weeks ago I wore collared shirts and shaved almost every day of the week.That’s because I was scheduled to participate a series of online conversations that were recorded for viewing. First, I spoke with Bob Allison and Jonathan Lane...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Mar 2021

“The End of Tory Row” Online, 11 March

On the evening of Thursday, 11 March, I’ll offer an online presentation for the Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site about “The End of Tory Row.”For the past several years, I’ve spoken about...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Mar 2021

Events on “Colonial North America” at Harvard

The Harvard University Library has a number of events lined up to spread news of its Colonial North America project.For nearly a decade, the library has been digitizing manuscripts and archival materials from across the system. Thousands of items can...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Mar 2021

Histoire et mémoire du régime seigneurial au Québec

Olivier Guimond Benoît Grenier (dir.) (coll. Alain Laberge et Stéphanie Lanthier), Le régime seigneurial au Québec : fragments d’histoire et de mémoire (Sherbrooke, Les Éditions de l’Université...
From: Borealia on 1 Mar 2021

History and memory of the seigneurial regime in Quebec

Olivier Guimond Benoît Grenier, ed. Le régime seigneurial au Québec: fragments d’histoire et de mémoire. In collaboration with Alain Laberge and Stéphanie Lanthier. (Sherbrooke: Les Éditions de l’Université...
From: Borealia on 1 Mar 2021

Studying America’s Earliest Jewish Communities

The Wyner Family Jewish Heritage Center at the New England Historic Genealogical Society is offering an online course on “Freedoms and Challenges: America’s Earliest Jewish Communities, 1650–1840” starting on 2 March.The course...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Feb 2021

Thorson on “Stone Walls on Minute Man,” 27 Feb.

On Saturday, 27 February, the Friends of Minute Man National Park will host its free Winter Lecture, this time beamed through the walls of our own homes. This year Prof. Robert Thorson will speak about “The Stone Walls of Minute Man National Park.”...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2021

Page 1 of 31123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.