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Your search for posts with tags containing history found 7708 posts

Role-Playing the French Revolution, Reacting to the Past in the Classroom

By Meghan Roberts “I hope that Robespierre is rotting in hell!” one of my students declared, and I realized that my Old Regime and French Revolution class had gone slightly off the rails. All semester, my students had shown an admirable ability...
From: Age of Revolutions on 24 Sep 2018

There was no Seigneurial System

Allan Greer From elementary school books to encyclopedia entries to scholarly treatises, no work on New France is complete without a section on the “seigneurial system,” a phenomenon that supposedly shaped the agrarian society of this colony...
From: Borealia on 24 Sep 2018

Review: Judith Ridner, The Scots Irish of Early Pennsylvania

Emily Yankowitz reviews Judith Ridner's The Scots Irish of Early Pennsylvania: A Varied People.
From: The Junto on 24 Sep 2018

The Great Land Flood of 1712 #History #Scotland

In late September, 1712, extremely heavy rains brought the worst flooding in living memory between Glasgow and Edinburgh. The Reverend Robert Wodrow wrote about them in his Analecta: ‘The 24 of this moneth, the Commission sate [in Edinburgh]. I...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 24 Sep 2018

The British Army of the Killing Times in the Winter of 1685 #History #Scotland

  On 10 December, 1685, General William Drummond wrote a memorial of the winter quarters appointed for the King’s Scottish Army, aka., the British Army, until further orders. The modern regiments descended from these regiments are @scots_guards,...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 23 Sep 2018

The Worst Day/Samuel Wardwell

I always think about the Salem Witch Trials in September, as the cumulative hysteria of 1692 was coming to a close with the execution of the last eight victims on September 22. Every year at this time I ponder a particular aspect of the accusations and...
From: streets of salem on 22 Sep 2018

The first calculating machine

  Even in the world of polymath Renaissance mathematici Wilhelm Schickard (1592–1635) sticks out for the sheer breadth of his activities. Professor of both Hebrew and mathematics at the University of Tübingen he was a multi-lingual philologist,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 21 Sep 2018

Fragmented Stories: Cloth from the Colonies in a 19th-Century Dress Diary

  Dear Junto readers, Thank you for joining us for two weeks of all-new scholarship tracing the historical patterns of #ColonialCouture! Read the whole roundtable here. Today’s #ColonialCouture finale post is by Kate Strasdin, senior lecturer...
From: The Junto on 21 Sep 2018

Is History too Important to be Left to Historians? A review of Canada’s Odyssey: A Country Based on Incomplete Conquests by Peter H. Russell.

Peter H. Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey is a sweeping reconsideration of the foundations of Canada’s constitutional order that has garnered considerable attention and praise. This essay is the third in a three-part series assessing the book’s...
From: Borealia on 21 Sep 2018

Tudor and Stuart Seafarers, at the Royal Museums, Greenwich

“Adventure, Power Wealth.”  Piggott Family Gallery, Tudor and Stuart Seafarers, at the Royal Museums, Greenwich.  If you like model ships, you will like this exhibit.

Georgian era recipes for cheesecakes, custards, tarts and syllabubs

In our last blog, we looked at the Cheesecake House in Hyde Park where you could feast upon all manner of delicious cheesecakes, custards, tarts and syllabubs. Today, we thought we would share a few Georgian era recipes for these delicacies. One thing...
From: All Things Georgian on 20 Sep 2018

Review: The New Tudor and Stuart Seafarers Gallery at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

A disclaimer: this post has been written and posted rather more rapidly than usual, as it was only yesterday evening (19 September) that I went with the ‘LadyQJ’ of my Twitter feed (aka Wendy) to the launch event for the four new permanent...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 20 Sep 2018

Luxurious Tipping Points in Early Massachusetts

Today’s #ColonialCouture post is by Ben Marsh, senior lecturer in history at the University of Kent and author of Georgia’s Frontier Women: Female Fortunes in a Southern Colony (University of Georgia Press, 2012). His current research project...
From: The Junto on 20 Sep 2018

Recipes: Reading Between the Lines

In today’s post, Lisa Myers describes the possibilities in using recipes as a teaching tool to explore ideas about power, social relationships, and connection. Lisa Myers During breakfast at the gas station/restaurant in Shawanaga, the reserve...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Sep 2018

Francophone Quebecers in Canada’s Odyssey: Pillar or Passengers?

Peter H. Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey is a sweeping reconsideration of the foundations of Canada’s constitutional order that has garnered considerable attention and praise. This essay is the second in a three-part series assessing the...
From: Borealia on 19 Sep 2018

Priscilla Mullins Alden and the Search for a Dress in Pieces

Today’s #ColonialCouture post is by Kimberly Alexander, professor of museum studies and material culture at the University of New Hampshire and author of Treasures Afoot: Shoe Stories from the Georgian Era (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018)....
From: The Junto on 19 Sep 2018

On Wednesdays We Wear Prints: Fashion Rules in the African Atlantic

Today’s #ColonialCouture post is by Bronwen Everill, lecturer in history at Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge University, and author of Abolition and Empire in Sierra Leone and Liberia, Cambridge Series in Imperial and Post-colonial Studies...
From: The Junto on 18 Sep 2018

Mixed Message: A Student Perspective

In today’s post, graduate student Samantha Eadie discusses her experiences developing the recent University of Toronto exhibit Mixed Messages: Making and Shaping Culinary Culture in Canada, which we featured here on the Recipes Project in...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Sep 2018

Yuchi Fashion Week, 1736

  Welcome back to week two  of our #ColonialCouture roundtable! Today’s post is by Jessica Yirush Stern, associate professor of history at California State University, Fullerton, and the author of The Lives in Objects: Native Americans,...
From: The Junto on 17 Sep 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.