The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing history found 7199 posts

17C American Women: Women in 17C Virginia

17C American Women: Women in 17C Virginia: This is the Virginia of the  Native Americans,  that British American colonial women would have found in the early years of the 1600s.   ...Hand-colored illustration of Theodor de Bry's (1528-1598)...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 20 Feb 2018

“One Year of the Sea! There’s Only One Year of the Sea!”

A version of this post would have been my first of the year, and would have been published some weeks ago, had not more pressing matters intervened. *** So it’s 2018, the Wales Year of the Sea. Or so the marketing gurus who came up with the concept...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 19 Feb 2018

Presidential Fabric

I always commemorate Presidents Day by remembering all (or many) of our presidents rather than just Washington and Lincoln: different themes each year have yielded interesting perspectives on both the institution and the individuals. This year, for instance,...
From: streets of salem on 19 Feb 2018

Topsy-Turvy

I find myself these days full of feelings of dissent and resistance but looking for more whimsical ways to express the same, as you can’t be strident all the time. It’s boring, and exhausting. So a flashing reference caught my attention, to...
From: streets of salem on 16 Feb 2018

A Can of Worms

The hedgehog and the fox; lumpers and splitters; generalists and specialists: these are not all quite the same distinction, but they share a strong family resemblance. For some people, the world — or, to put it in temporal terms, the past —...
From: memorious on 16 Feb 2018

Reviews in the JWH, Dec 2017

Journal of World History 28/3-4 (2017): Heather R. Peterson reviews Nancy van Deusen, Global Indios: The Indigenous Struggle for Justice in Sixteenth-Century Spain (Duke, 2015). Susan Kellogg reviews Amber Brian, Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s Native...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 16 Feb 2018

The Battle of Falkirk Muir

On the 17th January 1746, just under three months before Culloden, the Jacobites won their last battle. After their success at Prestonpans in September 1745, the general feeling among the Jacobites was one of increased optimism. Charles Edward Stuart,...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 16 Feb 2018

ὁ Καρπός, Aphorisms 6 – 1

As our reader continued to work through Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός he either was uninterested in the minor errors in the Greek or didn’t notice them (such as the τοῦ γενεθλίω...
From: Darin Hayton on 16 Feb 2018

Burke, Clossey, & Fernández-Armesto, “The Global Renaissance” in JWH, March 2017

Journal of World History 28/1 (2017): Peter Burke, Luke Clossey, & Felipe Fernández-Armesto, “The Global Renaissance.”
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 15 Feb 2018

Coates Reviews Laband in the JMiH, July 2017

Journal of Military History 81/3 (2017): Timothy J. Coates reviews John Laband, Bringers of War: The Portuguese in Africa during the Age of Gunpowder and Sail, from the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Centuries (Frontline Books, 2013).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 14 Feb 2018

Hastened Hearts

I have always focused on hearts for St. Valentine’s Day and this year will be no exception: even in the midst of my Phillips frenzy. Actually, I could showcase some Phillips materials because for some reason, among the thousands of materials in...
From: streets of salem on 14 Feb 2018

Podcast: C18th chat-up lines, with Dan Snow

Happy Valentine’s Day! To celebrate, a look back at my chat with Dan Snow about love, romance and sex in the 18th century, including some of my favourite historical chat-up lines & a bit of a swoon over Sharpe and/or Mr Darcy. Podcast link below:...
From: The History of Love on 14 Feb 2018

Tagliacozzo Review Article in JWH, Dec 2016

Journal of World History 27/4 (2016): Eric Tagliacozzo, “Travel, Transport and Trade in Asian HIistory: New Directions in the Field,” reviews By Steppe, Desert, and Ocean: The Birth of Eurasia by Barry Cunliffe, and: Hinterlands...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 13 Feb 2018

The Arsenic Poisoner

Elizabeth Hinchcliff, aged 14, stood before the court at the Old Bailey, on September 19th, 1810, indicted, that, on August 16th, 1810 she administered a deadly poison, arsenic, with the intent of murdering her employer, Ann Parker, two children in her...
From: All Things Georgian on 13 Feb 2018

Aphorisms 4 and 5 from Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός

Let’s follow our reader through a couple more aphorisms from Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός. Again he glosses most of the Greek with Latin translations and, once again, corrects a couple scribal errors by writing the...
From: Darin Hayton on 13 Feb 2018

Social Revolutions Beyond the Volga: Egypt and Ireland

By Aidan Beatty In 1919, a “Revolution” broke out in Egypt; since 1882, Britain had held an outsized role in Egyptian affairs but never directly ruled the country, instead preferring to use local royalty as intermediaries.  In the...
From: Age of Revolutions on 12 Feb 2018

Home, Hearth & History

I’m really looking forward to an upcoming exhibition at the Concord Museum: Fresh Goods: Shopping for Goods in a New England Town, 1750-1900, offered as part of a state-wide MASS Fashion collaborative project which will include a fall exhibition...
From: streets of salem on 12 Feb 2018

More fun with Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός

Our premodern reader didn’t just add Latin glosses to his copy of Ptolemy’s Ὁ Καρπός, now and then he emended the Greek. For example, on the second aphorism the copiest wrote “τὴν κρεῖττον”....
From: Darin Hayton on 11 Feb 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.