The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "histsci"

Your search for posts with tags containing histsci found 20 posts

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 21 Aug 2019

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 17 Dec 2018

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 8 Aug 2018

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 7 Feb 2018

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609), Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection. Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members...
From: Conciatore on 22 Sep 2017

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609), Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection. Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members...
From: Conciatore on 22 Feb 2017

Under The Knife – Reboot!

It’s been 18 months since I’ve filmed an episode of my YouTube series, Under The Knife. But that ends today! Check out the trailer to the series reboot, which may or may not involve my severed head. A NEW episode is coming next week....
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 8 Dec 2016

“We Have Conquered Pain!” The Uses & Abuses of Ether in History

The surgical revolution began with an American dentist and a curiously sweet-smelling liquid known as ether. Officially, ether had been discovered in 1275, but its stupefying effects weren’t synthesized until 1540, when the German botanist and chemist...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 30 Nov 2016

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609), Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection. Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members...
From: Conciatore on 3 Oct 2016

The Medicalization of Death in History

When the Black Death swept through Europe in the 14th century, it claimed the lives of over 75 million people, many of who were clergymen whose job it was to help usher the dying into the next world. In response to the shortage of priests, the Ars Moriendi...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 30 Aug 2016

The Cutter’s Art: A Brief History of Bloodletting

  When King Charles II suffered a sudden seizure on the morning of 2 February 1685, his personal physician had just the remedy. He quickly slashed open a vein in the king’s left arm and filled a basin with the royal blood. Over the next few...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 28 Jul 2016

Mangling the Dead: Dissection, Past & Present

I never feel more alive than when I am standing among the rows and rows of anatomical specimens in medical museums around London. In one jar floats the remains of an ulcerated stomach; in another, the hands of a suicide victim. Cabinets are...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 28 Jun 2016

“Limbs Not Yet Rigid” – A History of Dissecting the Living

Several years ago, the news reported a story that could have come straight from the script of a horror movie. In October 2009, Colleen S. Burns was admitted to St Joseph’s Hospital Center in New York for a drug overdose. A short time later, a team...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 20 May 2016

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609), Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection. Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members...
From: Conciatore on 7 Oct 2015

Resurrecting the Body Snatchers: The Halloween Edition

I’ve written about body snatchers several times on this site, and each time, readers ask for more. Given that it’s Halloween, I thought I would give into that request and return to the subject in a longer, more comprehensive article about these fascinating...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 31 Oct 2014

1 Million Hits!

I’m thrilled to announce that The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice has just surpassed 1 million hits. Wow, what a journey it’s been! I’m constantly surprised by the interest this site generates each and every year, and am deeply grateful to you,...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 29 Oct 2014

The Duke's Mouthwash Reprise

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of court,...
From: Conciatore on 6 Oct 2014

The Anaesthetized Queen & the Path to Painless Childbirth

‘Did the epidural hurt?’ I ask Rebecca Rideal—editor of The History Vault—one morning as we sit outside the British Library. ‘Not really.’ She hesitates, clearly wanting to say more without divulging too much information. ‘I mean, it’s...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 15 Aug 2014

Being a Medical History Blogger

The year was 2010. I had just completed 9 years of university education which culminated in a PhD from the University of Oxford in the History of Science, Medicine & Technology; and I was about to start a 3-year postdoctoral research fellowship...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 7 Aug 2014

The Syphilitic Whores of Georgian London

People think I’m obsessed with syphilis, and maybe I am. But it’s only because of my recent indoctrination into 18th-century history by aficionados of the period, such as Lucy Inglis, Adrian Teal and Rob Lucas.  I can’t read 10 pages of a medical...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 3 Mar 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.