The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "honey"

Showing 1 - 20 of 32

Your search for posts with tags containing honey found 32 posts

18th century marriage customs

When people marry today, they can choose where they marry, be it a religious building, registry office or even by taking their vows whilst sky diving and anywhere in between, as long as an officiating officer is present. In the Georgian period marriages...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 May 2022

The Duke's Mouthwash

 Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members...
From: Conciatore on 8 Feb 2021

From the Archive: A New Year’s Recipe from Old Prussia

As we prepare to enthusiastically welcome a new year (and say good riddance to 2020), I would love to revisit a wonderful recipe for celebratory cakes. In this piece that originally published in 2014, Molly Taylor-Poleskey notes that honey cakes commemorated...
From: The Recipes Project on 31 Dec 2020

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 31 Jul 2020

Medical Use of Honey in the 17th & 18th centuries. Documentation.

18th Century Medicinal Uses for Honey. ‘A poultis for a Swelling by My Aunt Dorothy Pates’, for example, used honey as a binding agent. Another recipe, said to be ‘approved by the best doctars [sic]’ used a clove of garlic...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 3 Oct 2019

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 21 Aug 2019

If Only We Had a Primary Source: Stories of the American Revolution

There are many myths associated with the American Revolution, and at JAR we do our best to set the record straight on as many... The post If Only We Had a Primary Source: Stories of the American Revolution appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

For Your Medical Kit. A Natural Antibiotic & More.

www.myspicer.com/history-turmeric/Hannah Glasse’s 1747 cookbook, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. http://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/turmeric-history/
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 9 May 2019

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 17 Dec 2018

‘Used With Constant Success’: Animal Ingredients in Eighteenth-Century Remedies, and their Success in the Beauty Industry

It’s Halloween, so it’s fitting that I’m writing about slimes and sticky oozes, though somewhat misleading. This post considers three common animal-derived medicinal ingredients found in eighteenth-century recipes. Earlier this week,...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Oct 2018

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 8 Aug 2018

Recipes for honey-drinks in the first published English beekeeping manual

By Matthew Phillpott The Roman emperor Augustus is said to have asked the Roman orator, poet, and politician, Publius Vedius Pollio, how to live a long life. Pollio answered that ‘applying the Muse water within, and anointing oil without the body’...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Jul 2018

Seminar paper – 14 June 2018, 5.30pm, Institute of Historical Research – The profit of bees and honey: beekeeping manuals on the cusp of scientific study, 1568-1657

On Thursday 14 June, I’ll be presenting for the first time a part of my early modern beekeeping research. This is at the Food History seminar, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, University of London. The seminar is free and open to...
From: Sixteenth Century Scholars on 11 Jun 2018

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609),Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection.Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members of...
From: Conciatore on 7 Feb 2018

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609), Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection. Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members...
From: Conciatore on 22 Sep 2017

SUGAR VERSUS HONEY IN BYZANTINE RECIPES

By Petros Bouras-Vallianatos The Byzantine Empire, with its capital in Constantinople (now Istanbul), then a mainly Greek-speaking region, constituted a natural crossroads between East and West for more than a millennium (AD 324–1453). Its history...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Sep 2017

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609), Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection. Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members...
From: Conciatore on 22 Feb 2017

The Duke's Mouthwash

Ferdinando de’ Medici (1549-1609), Scipione Pulzone (1544 - 1598), Private collection. Antonio Neri's father, Neri Neri, was royal physician to the family of Grand Duke Ferdinando de' Medici. As such, he regularly interacted with other members...
From: Conciatore on 3 Oct 2016

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.