The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "how-to"

Showing 1 - 20 of 45

Your search for posts with tags containing how-to found 45 posts

Getting Dressed in 18th Century - 1780s - 1790 {Video}

Let's get dressed!Hi Lovelies!I made a short video showing the steps and pieces of getting dressed in a 1780s Italian gown or Robe a l'Anglaise. I know for new costumers all the layers and which order they go in can be a bit confusing.(*I forgot my pocket...

Pattern Notes on Simplicity 8578 - Robe a la Francaise Dress Pattern

A couple years ago now we worked with Simplicity to create a Robe a la Francaise pattern (Simplicity 8578) based on Abby's sacque in The American Duchess Guide to 18th Century Dressmaking. When that pattern came out, I wanted to use it to make my own,...

How to Scale Up Gridded Sewing Patterns with Adobe Photoshop

If you've been into historical costuming for any amount of time, you will familiar with many a book featuring gridded (or scaled) sewing patterns. The Tudor Tailor, Patterns of Fashion (all of them), Period Costume for Stage and Screen, and The American...

All About 1830s Corsets and Fan Lacing

One of the biggest questions we get about our 1830s ensembles is about the corsets, so we've made a video telling you all about them:Both of our corsets were purchased from RedThreaded, who offers several different options. Mine is the "Sylvie" style...

Vlog: The 1830s Bustle!

Howdy! We're deep, deep down the #1830s rabbit hole, working diligently on our gowns with much haste in preparation for our trip to Dickens Fair in San Francisco on December 15th.Abby has been very responsibly recording her progress for our new vlog #SewingIsHard...

How to Fit 18th Century Shoe Buckles

You've just got yourself a fine new pair of American Duchess 18th century shoes and you ordered some sparkly 18th century shoe buckles to go with them. Now what?Fitting shoe buckles is an archaic skill that disappeared when shoe buckles fell out of fashion....

How to Lengthen/Shorten 18th Century Stays

The #1 question we receive about Simplicity 8162 (and will with Simplicity 8579 as well) is how to lengthen or shorten the stays. Particularly with Simplicity 8162, the body block used came up a little short and most seamstresses are needing to lengthen...

CORRECTION - 1780s Cap Pattern - American Duchess Guide

Hi gals! We've been alerted to a flaw in the 1780s cap pattern from "The American Duchess Guide to 18th Century Dressmaking," so before you all tear your pomaded-and-powdered hair out trying to make the ruffles fit the band, here is the correction:Share...

Teaching a Perfect Knowledge in the Arts and Sciences: Robert Dossie’s chemical, pharmaceutical, and artistic handbooks

By Marieke Hendriksen Robert Dossie (1717-1777) was and English apothecary, experimental chemist, and writer. Within just three years, he published three very successful handbooks: The elaboratory laid open (1758) on chemistry and pharmacy for ‘all...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Dec 2017

BOOK RELEASE: The American Duchess Guide to 18th Century Dressmaking

Today's the big day! Our book, The American Duchess Guide to 18th Century Dressmaking: How to Handsew Georgian Gowns and Wear The with Style has officially been released! While you can buy the book on any major book retailer, we do also have copies...

The American Duchess Guide: Behind the Scenes With The 1760s Sacque Gown {Video}

Our c. 1768 sacque gown created for The American Duchess Guide to 18th Century Dressmaking, made for and modeled by Abby Cox. You can create this or your own creative design with the instructions in the book! Hi lovelies! We recently did a Facebook Livecast...

How to Research Like a Boss: Part 6

How to be a Boss at Research Part 6: I’ve done all this research & I want to share it with the world - Rules of Engagement For Review: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5 Ok, So here we are. You’ve gone down a rabbit hole of research...

How to Research like a Boss - Part 5

How to Research like a Boss: Part 5 - Tertiary Sources & the Changing Research World – Rules of Engagement, or, Facebook with Caution. (For Review: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4)1. Facebook groups and forums are not valid points of research. Let’s...

How to be a Boss at Research - Part 4

How to be a Boss at Research Part 4: Secondary Sources - Rules of Engagement.Hey Ya'll! Here we are at Part 4 of this series (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3) on how to be a Boss at Research. We've finished up with going over primary sources and now...

How to be a Boss at Research - Part 3

How to be a Boss at Research Part 3: Rules of Engagement - Primary SourcesAlright, kids, we're here. Part 3 of what appears to be a very long series about researching historic dress. Let's do a recap before we move on - yes?Part 1: Introduction to this...

How to be a Boss at Research - Part

How to be a Boss at Research Part 2:  Where to find those pesky primary sources from (mostly) the comfort of your own home! (For Review: Part 1)Hey Ya'll! Abby here again!So after the first post I'm sure a number of you are thinking, "Alright then,...

How to Be a Boss at Research - Part 1

How to be a Boss at Research Part 1: Intro, Different Types of Sources Hey Ya’ll! Abby here, and today I want to start a conversation with you about something that’s really important to a lot of us in this historic costumer/reenactor community....

DIY Hair Powder Shaker, or, DIY Powdered Sugar Shaker (depending on your Pinterest Mood)

Hello Lovelies!Abby here  -Today, I wish to speak with you about Arts & Crafts, while attempting to teach ya'll something that will make Pinterest go crazy with excitement!...maybe....?I guess it depends on 1 of 2 things.1. You're really into...

How To Make a 1920s Miss Fisher Wardrobe

For Costume College 2016, one of the classes I taught was about making a "Miss Fisher" wardrobe, developing your style based on the popular Australian murder-mystery show set at the end of the 1920s. I've talked about Miss Fisher here before, and I had...

18th Century Stays: Boning Patterns

In preparation for making your Simplicity 8162 18th c. stays, you may wish to re-draw the boning pattern. The pattern comes with an accurate layout for half-boned stays. If you would like to deviate from this, perhaps to add more support or change to...

Page 1 of 3123Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.