The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "immigrants"

Your search for posts with tags containing immigrants found 15 posts

Letter : London, to his uncle, 1798 August 21

Italian engraver and printmaker Luigi Schiavonetti (1765-1810) arrived in London around 1790 and was employed by Bartolozzi before setting up a successful business with his brother Niccolò. Schiavonetti’s varied output included book illustrations,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 May 2018

17th Century Supplies and Provisions List For Immigrants.

Provisions List 1630 A Catalog of such needefull things as every Planter doth or ought to provide to go to New-England Victuals for a whole yeere for a man... 8 Bushels of meale 2 Bushels of Otemeale. 1 Gallon of Aquavitae 1 Firkin of Butter 2 Bushels...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 29 Jan 2016

Another immigrant’s tale

I’ve just heard about a case in which an American Shakespeare academic hoping to remain in this country has been arrested and remains in custody. Dr Paul Hamilton received his PhD from the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford in 2015 and remains a...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 26 Jan 2016

Making Home, Writing Home: Letters, Diaries, and Self-Fashioning

Angela Duffett In the summer of 1853, a 17 year old boy left St. John’s, Newfoundland on a mercantile ship owned by his father. Bound for Ireland and the seminary, he kept a journal chronicling the passage. It is unclear who Richard Howley intended...
From: Borealia on 30 Nov 2015

‘Déjà Vu All Over Again’? The Upper Canadian Election of 1836 and the Canadian Federal Election of 2015

Denis McKim Disappointing economic growth, especially in comparison to the United States; controversy surrounding immigration from a strife-plagued land; and a communications strategy designed to benefit conservative forces while discrediting their progressive...
From: Borealia on 5 Oct 2015

Shakespeare, Sir Thomas More, and the refugee migrants

Banksy’s 2014 take on immigration The story of the week: in fact the story of the summer, has been the displacement of people from war-torn and impoverished parts of the Middle East and Africa to Europe. It’s been described as the biggest...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Sep 2015

A Valentine’s Card from 1752

Historic New England’s collection includes this cutwork valentine with German fraktur calligraphy. The border features men, women, birds, and flowers cut from paper. In the center is a poem, which reads in translation:Let love occupy your heartLet...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Feb 2015

Load Carrying Methods For Women.

Any pack or bag method used by men can also be used by women, but here are some images specifically of women carrying baggage.Cordage and knots. 16th century.Daniel Chodowieki 1764ERHARD SCHOEN . LANSQUENET AND WIFE, C. 1535French, 18th century.Woman...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 24 Aug 2014

Alexander Gilles Edits His Hymnal

Glenda Goodman reported this find at Trinity College’s library on the Junto blog in July, but it didn’t really hit me until Slate Vault picked up on it (and posted bigger images). A man named Alexander Gilles went through a copy of Isaac Watts’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Aug 2013

The Face of Joseph Corré

Yesterday I left Joseph Corré in 1803 with his Mount Vernon Gardens theater closing. He advertised that real estate for rent for many months in the New York newspapers. All of the other ads from him that I’ve seen in the 1800s are for real estate,...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jul 2013

Joseph Corré: cook, hotelier, impresario

Yesterday I introduced the figure of Joseph Corré, President George Washington’s ice cream supplier in the spring and summer of 1790. At the time, of course, New York was the capital of the U.S. of A.Here’s a profile of the man from William...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jul 2013

Dr. Benjamin Rush Goes to a Jewish Wedding

Back in April 2010, novelist and comics scripter Greg Rucka wrote: Ok, so...anyone out there have information on Sephardic wedding customs in 1770s America? Out of gratitude for Gotham Central, I sprang into action. Finding websites and books stating...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jul 2013

Another American Revolution Miniseries in the Works

This month Deadline reported on another upcoming television miniseries set during the American Revolution:Production on The Book Of Negroes…will begin in the fall on the project written [by] Clement Virgo and [Lawrence] Hill. It will air stateside on...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jun 2013

William Cunningham, Son of Liberty

Historians of British prison reform and genealogists seem to be doing a good job at filling in the details of William Cunningham’s life after he served as provost martial (or marshal) for the Crown forces throughout the war. Which leaves his life before...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Dec 2012

Indentured. Starting a New Life in The New World.

When a husband or wife has died at sea, when the ship has made more than half of her trip, the survivor must pay or serve not only for himself or herself, but also for the deceased. When both parents have died over halfway at sea, their children, especially...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Sep 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.