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Search Results for "indigenous"

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Your search for posts with tags containing indigenous found 67 posts

Miskitu Moravians in Mesoamerica: Indigeneity, Faith, and Revolution in the 1980s

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Emily Snyder Somewhere in Nicaragua, there are forty lost...
From: Age of Revolutions on 17 Feb 2020

Anáhuac & Rome: Converging Indigeneity and Religiosity in Mexico’s Republican Moment

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Arturo Chang After having read Fray Servando Teresa de...
From: Age of Revolutions on 10 Feb 2020

The Great Fear of 1776

By Jeffrey Ostler Sometime in mid-1776, just as colonists were declaring their independence from Great Britain, an unnamed Shawnee addressed an assembly of representatives from multiple Indigenous nations who had gathered at the Cherokee capital of Chota....
From: Age of Revolutions on 23 Sep 2019

Young Dark Emu By Bruce Pascoe.

Young Dark Emu, By Bruce Pascoe.I have just finished reading the book Young Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe, & to say that I am saddened by what I read would be an understatement. This book tells the true story of the Australian Aboriginal people, their...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 8 Aug 2019

Australian Aboriginals. The First Farmers. A New History!

Aboriginal farm near Mount Franklin. Picture Credit: Culture Victoria.https://www.foreground.com.au/environment/decolonising-agriculture-bruce-pascoes-dark-emu/; Australian Aboriginals. The First Farmers . A New Australian History.It seems that what we...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 30 Jul 2019

Reconciling Chignecto: The many stories of Siknikt

Anne Marie Lane Jonah [Welcome to our summer series on Acadian history! We are very excited to be presenting this special five-week series, cross-posting on Unwritten Histories, Borealia, and  Acadiensis, and in collaboration with the Fredericton...
From: Borealia on 16 Jul 2019

Settler Colonialism and Recipes in the Early Modern Maritimes

Edith Snook [This is the second in a series of posts on the Early Modern Maritimes Recipes database. The entire series can be found here.] The region now known as the Maritime provinces of Canada had before 1800 a diverse population that included Indigenous,...
From: Borealia on 24 Apr 2019

Sir Walter Raleigh's Colonists Reach Virginia in 1584 Interacting with Native American Men & Women

Theodor de Bry (1528-1598) Native Americans Making Canoes  A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of VirginiaThe first voyage made to the coasts of America after Elizabeth I's grant to Sir Walter Raleigh, with two barks, wherein were Captaines...
From: 17th-century American Women on 1 Dec 2018

Remembering the Unbearable Present: Colonial Biowarfare, Indigeneity, and the Challenge for Anthropocene Historiographies

“Anthropocene Word Cloud from Wikipedia.”  Notably, the words colonial, imperial, indigenous, violence, and their derivatives do not appear.   “It is hard for us to examine our connection with unbearable pasts with which we...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 19 Nov 2018

Property and Dispossession: Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America–A Review

Gregory Kennedy Allan Greer, Property and Dispossession: Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America (Cambridge University Press, 2018). This ambitious book considers “the ways in which Europeans and their Euro-American descendants remade...
From: Borealia on 22 Oct 2018

Mapping Land Tenure Pluralism in the St. Lawrence River Valley

Julia Lewandoski [This essay kicks off a Borealia series on Cartography and Empire-on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  After the 1763 Peace of Paris, British officials embarked...
From: Borealia on 26 Sep 2018

Is History too Important to be Left to Historians? A review of Canada’s Odyssey: A Country Based on Incomplete Conquests by Peter H. Russell.

Peter H. Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey is a sweeping reconsideration of the foundations of Canada’s constitutional order that has garnered considerable attention and praise. This essay is the third in a three-part series assessing the book’s...
From: Borealia on 21 Sep 2018

An Odyssey or a Contract: Conquests, Cessions, Constitutions and History

Peter H. Russell’s Canada’s Odyssey is a sweeping reconsideration of the foundations of Canada’s constitutional order that has garnered considerable attention and praise. This essay is the first in a three-part series assessing the book’s...
From: Borealia on 17 Sep 2018

Hope and Despair in the Meghalayan Age

Gregory Kennedy Note: This is the fourth in a series on environmental history and early modern history cross-posted with  NiCHE, the Network in Canadian History & Environment. Life as an academic often feels like constant movement...
From: Borealia on 4 Sep 2018

National Peasants: The Revolutionary Politics of Identity in MNR’s Bolivia

By Elena McGrath The revolutionaries who took power in Bolivia after arming workers and peasants in April of 1952 believed that they would be the first to bring Bolivia into the modern world. The Revolutionary Nationalist Movement (Movimiento Nacionalista...
From: Age of Revolutions on 28 May 2018

Indigenous People and Peruvian Independence: A Polemical Historiography

This post is a part of the “Race and Revolution” Series. By Silvia Escanilla Huerta  The role of indigenous people in the process of independence in Peru has always been controversial in the historiography. On...
From: Age of Revolutions on 21 May 2018

Race, or The Last Colonial Struggle in Latin America

This post is a part of our “Race and Revolution” series. By Jason McGraw Latin America has long captivated outsiders for its seeming absence of a black-white racial binary, fluidity in racial self-ascriptions, and racially-mixed populations. ...
From: Age of Revolutions on 12 Mar 2018

“Race and Revolution” Series Introduction

“Race and Revolution” Series Introduction “The race question is subsidiary to the class question in politics, and to think of imperialism in terms of race is disastrous. But to neglect the racial factor as merely incidental is an error...
From: Age of Revolutions on 26 Feb 2018

Women in 17C Virginia

This is the Virginia of the Native Americans, that British American colonial women would have found in the early years of the 1600s.  Hand-colored illustration of Theodor de Bry's (1528-1598) engraved illustration of the Native American...
From: 17th-century American Women on 19 Feb 2018

1668 - Journal of Connecticut farmer Thomas Minor (1608-1690) mentioning his wife Grace Palmer

A Year in the Life of Thomas Minor, Connecticut Farmer, 1668.Thomas Minor (1608-1690) was born in England & sailed to New England in 1630.  Thomas Minor is considered one of the 4 founders of the Town of Stonington.  In 1653, he bought the...
From: 17th-century American Women on 20 Jan 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.